How to Be Like Jackie Robinson: Life Lessons from Baseball's Greatest Hero [NOOK Book]

Overview

Long before the blockbuster movie "42" was conceived, Pat Williams told the story of the courage, commitment and character of Jacke Robinson. Through deeply inspiring examples using Jackie's own words and actions, How to Be Like Jackie Robinson proves that, not only is he one of our greatest heroes, but he is also one of our greatest teachers.
Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier in 1947, changing the great American sport...

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How to Be Like Jackie Robinson: Life Lessons from Baseball's Greatest Hero

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Overview

Long before the blockbuster movie "42" was conceived, Pat Williams told the story of the courage, commitment and character of Jacke Robinson. Through deeply inspiring examples using Jackie's own words and actions, How to Be Like Jackie Robinson proves that, not only is he one of our greatest heroes, but he is also one of our greatest teachers.
Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier in 1947, changing the great American sport forever and inspiring future generations to emulate his courage, his commitment and his decency.

No other book about Jackie Robinson presents him as fully and truthfully as How to Be Like Jackie Robinson and none is as uplifting. Drawing on more than 1,100 interviews with Jackie's family and friends, his teammates and opponents, and the people whose lives he touched and shaped, Pat Williams shows how Jackie's life and the values he embodied serve as models for us all. Each example of Jackie's courage and character will inspire you to live each day with the same
commitment to decency and humanity.

'He had a fire in him. His whole life, he believed if things were wrong, he wanted to change them. He had a strong belief in himself and in what was right, and he was not going to tolerate injustices to people. Jackie Robinson couldn't stand being on the sidelines and being left out of the action.'
-Sharon Robinson, daughter of Jackie Robinson

'Jackie Robinson was my hero. Jackie was a gifted athlete, but he was a man of integrity.'
-Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Hall of Fame basketball player

'I loved Jackie Robinson. You remembered him if you ever met him. He had that kind of impression on you for the rest of your life. If you list the fifty or 100 most significant Americans of all time, Jackie Robinson has to be on the list.'
-Dave Anderson, author and New York Times sports columnist

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780757394867
  • Publisher: Health Communications, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,180,322
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Pat Williams is senior vice president of the Orlando Magic and author of more than 30 successful books; including 4 book in the How to Be Like series.

Mike Sielski is the sports columnist for Calkins Media, a daily newspaper chain in suburban Philadelphia. The Newspaper Association of America has named him one of the 20 best newspaper people under age 40 in the nation.

Allan H. (Bud) Selig is the ninth Commissioner of Major League Baseball.

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Read an Excerpt

On March 14, 2003, I returned to Philadelphia to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of my greatest professional triumph to date. The 76ers were playing the Portland Trailblazers that night, and at halftime of the game, the Sixers were honoring their 1983 NBA Championship team, the last of the city’s four major sports teams to win a title.

What a glorious night! I was the general manager of the Sixers in ‘83, and it was wonderful to see all the coaches and players and to relive that season for a few moments. First, there was a reception before the game for the team, and we all got to catch up: Coach Billy Cunningham and Julius Erving and Moses Malone and Bobby Jones and everyone who made the championship possible. There were so many hugs and hellos and fond memories, I walked around the room with a silly little smile on my face. I was just so happy to see everyone. At halftime of the game, they dimmed the lights of the First Union Center and introduced each of us one by one.

The building was filled with people, and they stood and cheered for us until all anyone could hear was just one long, loud sound. It was a powerful, emotional event, and it touched all of us.

Then, just as the night was ending, a tiny moment took place that I’ll remember forever. The team was finishing a bus ride from the arena to our hotel, and as the bus pulled up, Clint Richardson turned toward me. Clint was the third guard on the ’83 Sixers, behind point guard Mo Cheeks and shooting guard Andrew Toney, but he was essential to our success. He was a terrific defensive player, and he gave us a boost on offense every time he entered a game. Plus, he’s a sweet person, still wide-eyed and almost innocent after all this time.

“I’m sure glad we won,” he said to me. “They wouldn’t have had this event if we hadn’t, you know.”

Now, I’m sure that, at first reading, Clint’s words that night seem obvious and even childlike. However, he touched on a pretty profound concept.

Winning is important in life, and giving everything you have in the pursuit of winning is a noble, sometimes necessary goal. Only by putting all of yourself into that pursuit, and then succeeding, can you truly taste how sweet life can be. Clint was right. They wouldn’t have held that event for us if we hadn’t won, because second place is never as sweet as first.

And Jackie Robinson knew that truth well.

“It kills me to lose,” he once said. “If I’m a troublemaker—and I don’t think that my temper makes me one—then it’s because I can’t stand losing.”

©2005. All rights reserved. Pat Williams with Mike Sielski, Foreword: Allan “Bud” Selig, Commissioner of Baseball. Reprinted from How to Be Like Jackie Robinson: Life Lessons from Baseball’s Greatest Hero. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher: Health Communications, Inc.,
3201 SW 15th Street, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Very informative

    Read this for a project I was doing on Jackie Robinson. You always hear how great of a man he was, but this book really does a good job at capturing that. It has a a lot of little stories of just what Robinson had to go through during his playing days. Very easy read and intriguing.

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