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How to Behave at a Tea Party
     

How to Behave at a Tea Party

5.0 2
by Madelyn Rosenberg
 

What happens when opinionated Julia tries to teach her carefree little brother, Charles, how to behave at a tea party? This sweet and silly take on the classic manners theme is filled with sibling antics, laugh-out-loud moments, big imagination, and plenty of heart, making it perfect for readers of modern classics such as Fancy Nancy and Ladybug Girl. It's also

Overview

What happens when opinionated Julia tries to teach her carefree little brother, Charles, how to behave at a tea party? This sweet and silly take on the classic manners theme is filled with sibling antics, laugh-out-loud moments, big imagination, and plenty of heart, making it perfect for readers of modern classics such as Fancy Nancy and Ladybug Girl. It's also great for parents of tantrum-throwing preschoolers looking to impart some wisdom on how to cope with life's surprises.

Julia wants nothing more than to teach Charles proper tea party etiquette, but things are not going as planned. The tiny sandwiches have been gobbled up by the dog, Charles is using sugar cubes as building blocks, and the neighbor kids have eaten the centerpiece. Will Julia and Charles find a way to play together?

Editorial Reviews

ALA Booklist
“When throwing a tea party, a host expects certain decorum. However, when Julia invites her younger brother, Charlie, she learns a thing or two about expecting the unexpected. Photoshop digitally composed illustrations leave plenty of white space and feature brightly colored, energetic, and engaging scenes with action galore. Pair this with Caterina and the Perfect Party (2013), by Erin Eitter Kono, to show that being spontaneous can have its rewards.”
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
Julia likes to tell her younger brother, Charles, how to do things the proper way. She is planning a tea party and then begins by showing him that you open the invitation and then wash and put on your fancy clothes. Comical illustrations show Charlie with his pets as she tries to get him ready. They get ready in the yard as she tells him not to invite the McKagan brothers, the frog, or his snake. She shows him how to eat the cakes, and explains that he must say “please and thank you.” Meanwhile, Charlie and the guests do their own things such as making towers out of teacups and building rockets out of sugar cubes. The table comes crashing down and Julia orders everyone out. She sets up the table again and after being alone for a while, she re-invites the guests and decides that the things they were doing are fun after all. Young children should find this pleasant story with its cute illustrations fun to read. Reviewer: Vicki Foote; Ages 4 to 8.
Kirkus Reviews
2014-07-29
With such a mischievous little brother, what's a young hostess to do? As Julia plans and sets up her backyard tea party, younger brother Charles runs rings around and through it with the cute family dog, Rexie. And not far away are the McKagan brothers, redheaded twins with googly eyes, who match Charles prank for prank. They eat the peonies on the table (while Rexie is eating the tablecloth), and one of them stacks the teacups on his head. The metajoke of this book is that the text reads like a set of instructions written by Miss Manners that hint at the chaos shown in the pictures. "You may bring a stuffed animal. And a present. / Do not eat the peonies. Or the tablecloth!" Julia loses her temper and sends the boys away with big angry words that fill the page. But a tea party for one is not much of a party. She reinvites the boys and even allows Rexie to return. Before long, she's playing as rambunctiously as they are, building a rocket ship out of sugar cubes and climbing the big backyard tree. Rosenberg's prose is apt and economical, playing right into the humor of the book's digital illustrations, created with Photoshop. Ross' repertoire of facial expressions is a highlight. Fizzy and sweet if not exactly groundbreaking. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062279262
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/09/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
334,279
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD350L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Madelyn Rosenberg is the author of How to Behave at a Tea Party, the first book about Julia and Charles, illustrated by Heather Ross; The Schmutzy Family, illustrated by Paul Meisel; and Nanny X, a middle grade novel. She lives in Arlington, Virginia, with her husband, kids, cats, and fish. When she was in second grade, her dog, Taylor, took home the title of Happiest Puppy in the University Mall Pet Show.

Heather Ross is an illustrator, author, and textile designer. She is the illustrator of How to Behave at a Tea Party by Madelyn Rosenberg, as well as the Crafty Chloe books by Kelly DiPucchio. She also wrote the bestselling craft books Weekend Sewing and Heather Ross Prints. Heather's own dog, Lobo, currently holds a regional title for Smelliest Pup. She lives in New York City.

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How to Behave at a Tea Party 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
Why I liked this book- Ms. Rosenberg has written a marvelous picture book about a young girl who wants to throw a “fancy” tea party but all she has is not so fancy guests. :) The book has a subtle, but great, message – be flexible – improvise! Live life to the fullest! The book is told in the form of Julia telling rules about a tea party. She says things like “You must NOT slurp like a moose. Or burp like Uncle Victor.” I love how the book shows that things may not go the way you plan, but you can still have fun. The illustrations are really funny, and have little details in them that are fun to look at! *NOTE I got a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
cnifong More than 1 year ago
It's a busy afternoon for Julia and Charles and their many friends. I love how Julia learns what a party is really all about. The details are spot-on and the illustrations charming.