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How To Buy a Winning RC Car
     

How To Buy a Winning RC Car

5.0 2
by All classic book warehouse
 
Table of Contents
1. Anatomy of an RC Car
2. History of the RC Car Racing Hobby
3. Introduction: Buying a Winner RC Car for Beginners
4. Buying a Toy RC or a Hobby Level Car
5. Know the Parts of an RC Car before Buying
6. Electric RC Cars
7. Nitro RC Cars
8. Electric Versus Nitro RC Cars
9. Features of a Good RC Car Joystick
10.

Overview

Table of Contents
1. Anatomy of an RC Car
2. History of the RC Car Racing Hobby
3. Introduction: Buying a Winner RC Car for Beginners
4. Buying a Toy RC or a Hobby Level Car
5. Know the Parts of an RC Car before Buying
6. Electric RC Cars
7. Nitro RC Cars
8. Electric Versus Nitro RC Cars
9. Features of a Good RC Car Joystick
10. What to look for in a good RC Car Kit
11. Build from a car kit or run a ready-to-run RC car?
12. How to Check Durability of an RC Car
13. Upgrading an RC Car
14. Price Range of Different Kinds of RC Cars
15. What RC car accessories should you buy
16. RC car maintenance
17. How to Save Money in Buying an RC Car
18. Online Shops
19. Reviews of Magazines about RC Cars
20. Modern or Latest RC Car Models
- 3 -
Anatomy of an RC Car
Basic RC Car Components
Remote controlled car racing is a sport that has enjoyed popularity
among car model enthusiasts of all ages for several decades,
attracting both young and old. Malls featuring race tracks dedicated to
RC racing were prevalent for a while, and now die hard hobbyists race
each other in tracks of land set aside as racing strips for RCs.
Some RC enthusiasts prefer to buy pre assembled RC cars for their
races, while others buy kits and pay the shops where they bought
them to have them assembled professionally. The most personally
rewarding thing for some RC hobbyists, however, is to purchase a kit
and construct it themselves. For those of you who are new to the
sport, here is a basic rundown on the major parts that make up an RC
car.
Transmitter - this is a little handheld gadget used to control the car. It
operates on a certain bandwidth and sends out radio signals to tell the
car what to do (and hopefully keep it from crashing into stuff!). When
buying a transmitter make sure that it's bandwidth doesn't run along
the same wavelengths as any radio or TV stations in your
neighborhood, or you might find your RC kissing pavement when your
local station plays music that irritates your car.
Receiver - naturally, if the transmitter sends out commands,
something has to receive it. That's what this little box is for. It picks
up the signals from the transmitter and translates it into commands to
the car itself, stuff like "Brakes! Noooow!". It's the brain of the RC,
essentially.
Gearboxes - these translate the signals from the receiver into physical
action that controls the steering, brakes, and motor of the car. Good
gearboxes have to be sturdy, and have to have tough wiring to make
sure they don't get disconnected from the receiver. They're your car's
nervous system and muscles rolled into one.
Motor - the heart of any good full-scale car is the engine. Likewise, the
motor is the heart of any RC. Pick a motor that's efficient, with a good
power output for low energy or fuel consumption. Most of the rules
- 4 -
that apply when picking a good engine also apply to picking a good
motor for your RC.
Battery Pack/Fuel Source - depending on your RC's motor type, it will
either be powered by a battery or by a nitro fuel type similar to real
gasoline. The choice between the two becomes largely a matter of
personal preference, because with proper tweaking, a battery operated
motor can churn out power comparable to a nitro engine. If you're
going with stock motors though, nitro engines put out more juice to
make your car go go go! They're a bit tougher to maintain though.
Anatomically speaking, this is your car's stomach.
Chassis and frame - like a real car, this is the shell that defines your
RC's looks, as well as the framework that holds all the little parts of
the car together. Fiberglass chassis are tough and light, making them
ideal for racing, though for those of you who want more toughness
metal composite chassis are also available for some RCs. On a human,
this would be the bones and skin.
- 5 -
History of the RC Car Racing Hobby
RC Car Racing Through History
It all began in the sixties. Remote controlled planes were a growing
fad back then, with gasoline driven motors and meter-length
helicopters and airplanes that ruled the skies for hobbyists (and
occasionally made spectacular fireballs when incompetent pilots
handled them, hehehe!) The one day, in the late 60's closing in on the
1970s, some companies got the bright idea of installing those motors
on 1/8 scale cars. These vintage pieces were scaled down versions of
their real life counterparts, with authentic modeling across the board.
The seventies saw the advent of RC car racing as a general hobby
though, with smaller and more efficient scaled motors allowing gas
operated cars made with lightweight aluminum to run at 30-40 miles
per hour on tracks...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940014051132
Publisher:
All classic book warehouse
Publication date:
08/17/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
43
File size:
237 KB

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How To Buy a Winning RC Car 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Teaches you lots of stuff
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool