How to Cheat at Deploying and Securing RFID

Overview

RFID is a method of remotely storing and receiving data using devices called RFID tags. RFID tags can be small adhesive stickers containing antennas that receive and respond to transmissions from RFID transmitters. RFID tags are used to identify and track everything from Exxon EZ pass to dogs to beer kegs to library books.

Major companies and countries around the world are adopting or considering whether to adopt RFID technologies. Visa and Wells Fargo are currently running ...

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Overview

RFID is a method of remotely storing and receiving data using devices called RFID tags. RFID tags can be small adhesive stickers containing antennas that receive and respond to transmissions from RFID transmitters. RFID tags are used to identify and track everything from Exxon EZ pass to dogs to beer kegs to library books.

Major companies and countries around the world are adopting or considering whether to adopt RFID technologies. Visa and Wells Fargo are currently running tests with RFID, airports around the world are using RFID to track cargo and run customs departments, universities such as Slippery Rock are providing RFID-enabled cell phones for students to use for campus charges. According to the July 9 CNET article, RFID Tags: Big Brother in Small Packages?, "You should become familiar with RFID technology because you'll be hearing much more about it soon. Retailers adore the concept, and CNET News.com's own Alorie Gilbert wrote last week about how Wal-Mart and the U.K.-based grocery chain Tesco are starting to install "smart shelves" with networked RFID readers. In what will become the largest test of the technology, consumer goods giant Gillette recently said it would purchase 500 million RFID tags from Alien Technology of Morgan Hill, CA."

For security professionals needing to get up and running fast with the topic of RFID, this How to Cheat approach to the topic is the perfect "just what you need to know" book!

• For most business organizations, adopting RFID is a matter of when
• The RFID services market is expected to reach $4 billion by 2008
• Covers vulnerabilities and personal privacy—topics identified by major companies as key RFID issues

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781597492300
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Series: How to Cheat Series
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 0.75 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 9.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank Thornton runs his own technology consulting firm, Blackthorn Systems, which specializes in information security and wireless networks. His specialties include wireless network architecture, design, and implementation, as well as network troubleshooting and optimization. An interest in amateur radio helped him bridge the gap between computers and wireless networks. Having learned at a young age which end of the soldering iron was hot, he has even been known to repair hardware on occasion.

In addition to his computer and wireless interests, Frank was a law enforcement officer for many years. As a detective and forensics expert he has investigated approximately one hundred homicides and thousands of other crime scenes. Combining both professional interests, he was a member of the workgroup that established ANSI Standard "ANSI/NIST-CSL 1-1993 Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information."

An expert in multiple fields including computer networks and physics (the parent fields of RFID), Dr. Paul Sanghera is an educator, technologist, and an entrepreneur living in Silicon Valley, California. With a Master degree in Computer Science from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Physics from Carleton University, he has authored and co-authored more than 100 technical papers published in well reputed European and American research journals. He has earned several industry certifications including CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Project+, CompTIA Linux+, Sun Certified Java Programmer, and Sun Certified Business Component Developer. Dr. Sanghera has contributed to building the world class technologies such as Netscape Communicator, and Novell’s NDS. He has taught technology courses at various institutes including San Jose Sate University and Brooks College. As an engineering manager, he has been at the ground floor of several startups. He is the author of the following four books:
SCJP Exam for J2SE 5: A Concise and Comprehensive Study Guide for The Sun Certified Java Programmer Exam; In Depth: Project Management Professional Study Guide for PMP and CAPM Exams; Sun Certified System Administrator for Solaris 10 Study Guide; SCBCD Exam Study Kit: Java Business Component Developer Certification For EJB.

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Table of Contents

RFID Overview
Security Breaches
Hacking RFID
Protecting the Supply Chain
Modifying Product Information
Protecting Personal Privacy

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