How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett: Lessons from the World's Greatest Dealmaker

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Overview

Silver Winner?Tops Sales World's Best Sales and Marketing Book

Revealed: the winning blueprint for making deals like The Oracle of Omaha

Warren Buffett didn't become the world's third wealthiest individual on his investing instincts alone. Buffett is a master dealmaker. In fact, one of his greatest single successes came when he closed multiple deals to own 100 percent of the Government Employees Insurance ...

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How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett: Lessons from the World's Greatest Dealmaker

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Overview

Silver Winner—Tops Sales World's Best Sales and Marketing Book

Revealed: the winning blueprint for making deals like The Oracle of Omaha

Warren Buffett didn't become the world's third wealthiest individual on his investing instincts alone. Buffett is a master dealmaker. In fact, one of his greatest single successes came when he closed multiple deals to own 100 percent of the Government Employees Insurance Company—also known as GEICO.

Highly successful dealmakers themselves, Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries have been studying Buffett's unique approach for many years. Now, they reveal the secrets of the Oracle of Omaha. How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett gives you the 101 top deal-making maxims of a legend in his own time. Here's just a small sampling of what's

inside:

Warren Way #22: Choose quality.

"It's better to own a portion of the Hope diamond than 100 percent of a rhinestone."

Warren Way #41: Deal making is a no-called-strike

game.

"You don't have to swing at everything—you can wait for your pitch."

Warren Way #75. Think long term.

"Our favorite holding period is forever."

Warren Way #92. Don't do deals just to do deals.

"We don't get paid for activity, just for being right."

Warren Way #98. Think for yourself.

"My idea of a group decision is to look in the mirror."

Warren Way #99. Be honest in your deal making.

"It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it."

Searcy and DeVries round it all out with an abundance of their own expertise—approaches that, added up, have generated billions of dollars in new sales.

Take the advice in this hands-on guide and learn How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett reveals the method behind Buffett's near-mythic deal-making prowess. Guaranteed to help you come out on the right side of every deal!

"Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries have done a masterful job of distilling Buffett's wisdom into a highly readable book you’ll want to refer to again and again. A must-have

for dealmakers!" — Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The One Minute Manager and Leading at a Higher Level

"Almost anybody interested in deal making will find something of interest here. Simply the most important new book on deal making and big account sales strategy." — Marshall Goldsmith, author of the New York Times bestsellers MOJO and What Got You Here Won't Get You There

"Read this inspiring, advice-filled book to discover how you can leverage Warren Buffett's deal-making strategies to negotiate and win big contracts." — Jill Konrath, author of SNAP Selling and Selling to Big Companies

"This book is Dale Carnegie reconfigured for the business world." — Thomas Barnett, contributing editor at Esquire and author of Great Powers: America and the World After Bush

"This is the first book we've read that truly explains how Buffett thinks and how his lessons can be applied to your business." — Neil Senturia and Barbara Bry, serial entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship columnists for U-T San Diego

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071801652
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 11/6/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 470,870
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Searcy is the founder of Hunt Big Sales, a fast-growth consultancy and thought leadership organization. Tom is the author of RFPs Suck! and coauthor of Whale Hunting: How to Land Big Sales and Transform Your Company.

Henry J. DeVries is assistant dean of continuing

education at the University of California, San Diego. Each year he teaches thousands of business owners and executives how to grow their businesses and advance their

careers. Henry is coauthor of Self-Marketing Secrets, Pain Killer Marketing, and Closing

America's Job Gap.

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Read an Excerpt

How to Close a Deal Like WARREN BUFFETT

Lessons from the World's Greatest Dealmaker


By TOM SEARCY, HENRY DEVRIES

The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Copyright © 2013TMS Partners, Inc and Henry DeVries
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-07-180166-9


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The Quest to Make Deals Like Warren


On any given day in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1983, it would not have been unusual to see Rose Blumkin, the 89-year-old founder and owner of the largest single furniture store company in America, driving her scooter around her mini-empire, Nebraska Furniture Mart. However, one day that year, some customers saw something that was unusual: she was in the middle of an aisle, negotiating with future billionaire Warren Buffett over the sale of her company.

"Warren," she said, "I'm tired of fighting with my children over how to run this place, and I want to slow down."

"Rose, I've always told you that when you were ready to sell, I would buy. What's your price?" replied Warren.

They shook hands, and the deal was done. He gave her a handwritten check for $55 million, and the Blumkin clan went into partnership with his company, Berkshire Hathaway.

Does that sound impulsive? Not Warren. He followed several of his key principles in making this deal:

1. Know your numbers, their numbers, and all the numbers of the industry.

2. Make deals with the kind of people you would like to be in business with.

3. When it's time to make the deal, don't blink.


Back in 1983, the family that had created one of the iconic brands in the furniture industry made a deal to join forces with the future wealthiest man in the world. The deal was done in the course of an hour with a handwritten check and without a single lawyer present. That deal has stood to this day and has greatly benefited both parties.


The Way to Your Warren Buffett Deal

Do you remember the biggest deal you ever made?

Of course you do. Everyone has one, and everyone remembers it. How could you forget? Many times, you've gone back over that deal in your mind. You have probably replayed the deal, reviewing what led to its success. You examined the tactic you used that worked perfectly—even though you were pretty sure it wouldn't. You remembered any cringe-inducing moments and swore that you'd never go through anything like that again. You wondered what exactly happened that made this deal a winner. When did the tide turn in your favor, and why?

Of course, you've tried again and again to replicate that deal. But so far, it's been hit or miss—and you've never done anything quite as good as that deal. It was your biggest deal, and it might remain your biggest deal, unless you answer the call to make deals like Warren Buffett.

We certainly are not going to tell you how to replicate that deal. To us, replicate is just another way to say "stagnate." And in deal making, stagnation is the kiss of death. Besides, you can't replicate it. The circumstances of that deal were unique. No two deals are exactly alike, so replicating one isn't possible.

No, what we want you to do is something else entirely. We're going on a journey to let you be able to make deals like the greatest dealmaker of all time.

This quest is to land a deal that you can't even imagine yet—it's that big. It might be $10,000, $1 million, or $100 million. It might be with a private company, or it might be with one of the Generals (like General Electric, General Mills, or General Motors).

No matter what size company you have, you can land your Warren Buffett kind of deal. What we outline in this book will guide you through a successful quest. If you follow the lessons and apply them to your situation, your deal-making prowess is bound to improve along the way.

This book isn't about incremental and slow growth. It's about explosive, major growth through key account selling. Equally important, it's about explosive, major growth time and time again. Making a deal like Warren Buffett is not a one-trick pony. It's a mindset, a set of principles, and some very effective strategies that you can use again and again.

Please understand we are not saying that this is going to be easy. Something that's worth achieving seldom comes easily. We will outline for you the importance of the challenges you will face; give you some concrete, tactical ways to meet them; and tell you stories about Warren Buffett and other dealmakers who have been extremely successful in landing big deals that have transformed their companies, their careers, and their causes.

We are confident that anyone who meets—or surpasses—these challenges will land his own version of a Warren Buffett–style deal. The reason we are confident is that we've seen it work with unimaginable success time after time.

Over the years, we have been very fortunate to work with many marvelous clients who have graciously allowed us to tell you about their experiences. So you'll find client stories interspersed throughout the book. We use these stories as examples, of course, but also as a tribute to the dedication and hard work our clients have exhibited time and time again. They provide us with a large portion of our inspiration on a daily basis. And for that, we are truly grateful.


Warren Makes Deals Differently

If you want to know about making big deals, Warren is still the guy to watch. Why? The man knows how to talk about money when he's making deals.

Warren does deals differently from the average businessperson. For those who want a road map on how to make bigger and better deals, the lessons contained in the following chapters will show you the Warren way.

Warren is famous for doing enormous deals with as little information as a few pages of business plans and the standard financials that a company would submit to a bank in order to qualify for a loan. However, what he has when he goes into any conversation is an encyclopedic knowledge of how businesses work financially. He knows "their money," "their wallet," and how investments and outcomes should work. Follow his lead, and you will close more business.

We are unabashed Warren watchers. We own stock in his company, read his chairman's letters in the Berkshire Hathaway annual reports, and devour news reports on the man. Our interest is not in studying his investment wisdom, but in decoding how the man makes a deal. Here are just seven deal-making traits to emulate that we have learned from watching Warren from afar:

1. Know the other guy's money. Warren always seems to know how the people he's dealing with make it, how they count it, and how they spend it. This is obviously much easier to do for publicly traded companies. For privately held companies, some of the numbers are fairly easy to estimate—at least the cost of goods sold and probably the cost of sales. These numbers are critical to discussing the possibilities of working together. Too often, the discussion stops at the budget. When you don't know, ask. Don't ask for trade secrets, but at least ask for the industry averages. This provides a basic framework for the discussion.

2. Know the other guy's wallet. How would this sale affect any of these critical numbers? The terms of the deal should be looked at from the other guy's side of the table first, then from yours.

3. Start discussing the money early. You know you are going to discuss the money in more detail later. Early in the conversation, you do not have enough information for precision. Instead, you need to have an understanding of the economics of the prospect's industry so that you have enough information to determine if a deal makes any sense at all. Use that economic information and industry knowledge to frame a shared understanding of the reality of the money for this opportunity.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from How to Close a Deal Like WARREN BUFFETT by TOM SEARCY, HENRY DEVRIES. Copyright © 2013 by TMS Partners, Inc and Henry DeVries. Excerpted by permission of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction xi

Lesson 1 The Quest to Make Deals Like Warren 1

Lesson 2 Go Big 9

Lesson 3 Consider Many, Like Some, Love Few 15

Lesson 4 Bad Deals at Good Prices Are Still Bad Deals 25

Lesson 5 Deal Only with Dealmakers 31

Lesson 6 The Language of Big Deals 37

Lesson 7 Clear the Deal Path 47

Lesson 8 Getting to Dealmakers 55

Lesson 9 When You Are Going to Eat an Elephant, Don't Nibble 67

Lesson 10 A Little Help Goes a Long Way 81

Lesson 11 Victory Favors the Ready 89

Lesson 12 The Why Matters 99

Lesson 13 Expect the Unexpected 111

Lesson 14 Don't Fight, But When You Do... 127

Lesson 15 If You Want to Marry, Don't Tarry 131

Lesson 16 The Final Hour 139

Lesson 17 The Last Step Is Always Slippery 153

Lesson 18 After You Make Your First Warren Buffett Deal 161

Appendix A 101 Warren Ways 169

Appendix B Chronology of Buffett Deal Highlights 185

Appendix C The Making of a Dealmaker 191

Appendix D Further Reading 205

Notes 209

Index 211

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Great insights!

    Easy read. I little repetitive but interesting to learn a bit about Buffett and his style of business. I enjoyed the mix of stories and sales insights.

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