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How to Lie with Statistics
     

How to Lie with Statistics

4.3 21
by Darrell Huff
 

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Over Half a Million Copies Sold--an Honest-to-Goodness Bestseller

Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to

Overview

Over Half a Million Copies Sold--an Honest-to-Goodness Bestseller

Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to inform.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A 1954 classic that continues to dispel false beliefs and inform the statistically naive. Huff's direct and witty style exposes how advertisers, government and the media mislead their audiences through the misuse of statistics. Huff then explains how the reader can see through the smoke and mirrors to get to the real meaning--if any--of what is presented. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Management Review
“Mr. Huff's lively, human-interest treatment of the dry-as-bones subject of statistics is a timely tonic…This book needed to be written, and makes its points in an entertaining, highly readable manner.”
Atlantic
“A pleasantly subversive little book, guaranteed to undermine your faith in the almighty statistic.”
Bill Gates
“A great introduction to the use of statistics, and a great refresher for anyone who's already well versed in it.”
The New York Times
“A hilarious exploration of mathematical mendacity…. Every time you pick it up, what happens? Bang goes another illusion!”
Wall Street Journal
“In one short take after another, Huff picks apart the ways in which marketers use statistics, charts, graphics and other ways of presenting numbers to baffle and trick the public. The chapter “How to Talk Back to a Statistic” is a brilliant step-by-step guide to figuring out how someone is trying to deceive you with data.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393070873
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
12/07/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
194,077
File size:
2 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Darrell Huff lives in Carmel, California.

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How to Lie with Statistics 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought the book was very enjoyable. It allowed one to see the abilities of numbers and how deceiving they are. The book made me realize that even though you know you are looking at a certain number, you have no idea what it means. I loved the book, it was quite funny too in a sarcastic manner. It was very quick to read and contains many humorous illustrations;a great summer reading book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for summer reading in high school...Although I was not looking foward to reading it by the end of the book I found it to be very interesting and humerous along the way....The overall purpose of the book as stated in chapter 10 is,'How to look a phony statistic in the eye and face it down,' (Huff, 122). This book has really changed my point of view on how I look at surveys that the world uses to solidify faulty gimics....Great book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even when it was made in the 1950s, it's still relevant today. Genius.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Highly reccomended, very revealing. You should read it! It will tell you all you need to know about how you can be fooled by statistics.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for my high school AP statistics class. I truly enjoyed reading this book. My dad had to read the same while he was in college 30 years ago. We were able to discuss the book. Huff was very insightful but humorous at the same time. This book helped me to learn how much goes into statistics and the way that they use their data however they want to. It was a fun way to learn not only about math but about the way that people use that math. It was interesting that even though the book was written over 50 years ago that his examples still worked and I could relate to things he said. I would recommend it to anyone high school level or above especially if you plan on taking or using statistics in your life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before reading this book, I thought Huff would offer nothing new to thought. Huff proves me wrong by a large margin. His insight in statistics proves the errors of number the common man misses. After being force to read this for school, I find some enjoyment in reading this since it shows that trusting in numbers is a large mistake. Not a bad book, but some parts tend to last a little too long.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an absolute classic, and is essential reading for both undegraduate statistics students and anyone who has to work with statistics produced by others --- particularly political polls and market surveys. It identifies and explains many of the ways in which data can be presented so as to entirely distort their meaning.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first saw this book in college in the early '60s. I use it in my statistics and business research classes at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Other than dollar values much inflated in the past 46 years, Huff's comments are as current today as ever.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I still have the (paperback) copy of this book that I used for an introductory statistics course in the early 1970s. My wife was able to use it about five years ago for one of her university courses. I am very glad to see it now available for the Nook!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had hesitations on reading this book. Not only was it about math, it was also a required reading for my AP statistics class. I was surprised when I finished that I enjoyed the book. It was well written and gave insight to look at numbers deeper than just a bunch a figures. It was humorous and very informing. A great read for anyone taking a statistics class or who needs help to look beyond the numbers written on the page.