How to Make a Cherry Pie and See the U.S.A.

( 9 )

Overview

Fancy a slice of cherry pie? Let's get started. . . . What, no bowl? No pie pan? No pot holders?

Join our young baker (and her little dog!) as they travel the United States—from New Hampshire to Hawaii, from Alaska to Texas—in search of the coal, cotton, clay, and granite they need to create all their baking tools.

In a companion to her bestselling How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, two-time Caldecott Honor illustrator Marjorie ...

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Overview

Fancy a slice of cherry pie? Let's get started. . . . What, no bowl? No pie pan? No pot holders?

Join our young baker (and her little dog!) as they travel the United States—from New Hampshire to Hawaii, from Alaska to Texas—in search of the coal, cotton, clay, and granite they need to create all their baking tools.

In a companion to her bestselling How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, two-time Caldecott Honor illustrator Marjorie Priceman takes us on a round-the-U.S.A. journey by riverboat, taxi, train, and plane in a culinary adventure—and a playful celebration of America's natural resources.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Priceman (How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World) fires up the oven for another fanciful baking-cum-geography lesson. Her aspiring young pastry chef, jaunty pinafore and straw hat in place, embarks on a nationwide search for utensils as well as ingredients when she finds the local cook shop closed. First stop, New York, for a taxi ride to "the corner of Pennsylvania and Ohio"; "Then find the closest coal mine" (used to make steel, and thus a pie pan). Ship, plane, train and bus are among the other modes of transport that carry our heroine from sea to shining sea and beyond, to Alaska and Hawaii, landing her home for pie preparation on the Fourth of July. Like a series of playful postcards, the gouache scenes feature recognizable landmarks (Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Rushmore, oil wells), with the girl's loyal Airedale in on the action, too. Fans of the first book will cotton to this second helping, even though it's slightly less spontaneous. And the pie recipe is a welcome extra. Ages 5-8. (Oct.)

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School Library Journal

Gr 1-4

In this follow-up to How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World (Knopf, 1994), a spunky young baker is in the mood for cherry pie. She has the ingredients this time, but she's missing the equipment (bowl, pan, rolling pin, etc.) needed to get the job done. Traveling back and forth across the United States according to instructions that are given recipe style (and can be followed on the endpapers' map), she gathers natural resources from various regions (e.g., cotton from Louisiana to make pot holders) and heads home to manufacture the required objects. Smelting, spinning, weaving, carving, and glass making, the girl works until she has everything ready. The pie is a welcome addition to a July 4th celebration, where floats showcase the places she has visited. Priceman's story is expertly matched to her gouache paintings; loose and sketchy, vivid and childlike, they offer myriad details for each locale. In a school setting, the story is useful for introducing a unit on the United States and for teaching predicting skills. It's also silly enough to circulate just for fun.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA

Kirkus Reviews

The visuals take the cake, or rather the pie, in this folksy jaunt across the country. As a follow-up to the bestselling How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World (1994), Priceman sticks with a more local focus. Here, readers take a nonsensical and roundabout journey in search of items to make a cherry pie. Hail a taxi in New York and go to "the corner of Pennsylvania and Ohio" for coal to make a pie pan, then to a cotton farm in Louisiana to make potholders, to New Mexico for clay to make a mixing bowl and so forth. Strangely, the ingredients for the actual pie are not on the shopping list, just the raw materials to make the cooking equipment. Though informational, the journey is filled with so many random distractions young readers may have a hard time sticking with it. The rustic, lush illustrations, however, are as delicious as a cherry pie right from the oven, and for readers who really want to make one, there's a simple recipe included. (Picture book. 5-8)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385752930
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/6/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 307,372
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.37 (w) x 9.49 (h) x 0.17 (d)

Meet the Author

MARJORIE PRICEMAN is the author-illustrator of How to Make an Apple Pie and See the Worldand Emeline at the Circus, as well as the illustrator of Cold Snap (written by Eileen Spinelli) andParis in the Spring with Picasso (by Joan Yolleck). She has received two Caldecott Honors for Hot Air!The (Mostly) True Story of the First Hot-Air Balloon Ride and Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin by Lloyd Moss. She lives in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    How to make a cherry pie and see the usa

    I love this book. First,it teaches you how things are made. Also, if you were in the book it would have bin a great trip.

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    Posted July 15, 2010

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