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How to Make a Universe with 92 Ingredients: An Electrifying Guide to the Elements
     

How to Make a Universe with 92 Ingredients: An Electrifying Guide to the Elements

by Adrian Dingle
 

What do cars, stars, skyscrapers, and ice cream all have in common? They're all made from the same 92 ingredients...and so are we. And so is everything in the entire universe! How to Make a Universe with 92 Ingredients presents a unique and imaginative way for young readers to connect chemistry and science with their daily lives. By using dozens of familiar

Overview


What do cars, stars, skyscrapers, and ice cream all have in common? They're all made from the same 92 ingredients...and so are we. And so is everything in the entire universe! How to Make a Universe with 92 Ingredients presents a unique and imaginative way for young readers to connect chemistry and science with their daily lives. By using dozens of familiar objects (trees, cell phones, the Sun), author Adrian Dingle has built a platform from which to teach kids the unfamiliar — that trees, cell phones, and the Sun are all made of a handful of chemical elements found on the periodic table. Full of easy experiments and "Did You Know?" information that's perfect for sharing with friends, How to Make a Universe with 92 Ingredients takes on the impossible and triumphs — it makes chemistry FUN!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Winner, American Institute of Physics Science Communication Award, Writing for Children category (2014)

"The author's evident enthusiasm provides plenty of revs..."
Kirkus, July 17, 2013

"...this is a title sure to find an audience, one that will gain a newfound respect for the elements."
School Library Journal, September 1, 2013

"An entertaining look at the chemical composition and properties of such items as coins, fireworks, skyscrapers, airplanes, comets, and poison."
School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Amy S. Hansen
Elemental chemistry is no more complicated than cooking, according to Dingle’s fun, funny and well-written book. Okay, so it is a little more complicated, but the point is still well taken…everything we can touch came from those 92 elements, or some combination of them. If we had the energy to put them together in the right order, the logic goes, we too could create a universe. Dingle divides the book into four chapters. “Space, Earth and Nature” addresses distant stars, as well as Earth’s atmosphere, and the ingredients in Earth’s core. “Daily Life” talks about everyday chemistry, such as striking a match and the ingredients in milk and cookies. “Materials” explores how soap works and whether glass is a liquid or sold. The final section, “Cool Machines,” examines chemistry at work in computers and refrigerators. Dingle’s style is energetic, easy to understand, and enthusiastic, albeit occasionally over the top with exclamation points. Cartoonish illustrations are fun and accurate. This is a chemistry book, but would work as a supplemental book for earth sciences, materials, or even a general introduction that looks at the everyday world. Includes some experiments. Reviewer: Amy S. Hansen AGERANGE: Ages 10 up.
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
Gr 5–8—In the text's opening chapters, readers will gain the background needed to understand the building blocks of the universe: atoms, subatomic particles, elements, and compounds. On welcoming, browsable pages, the book bounces from topics as far ranging as stars to soap. Kids can read the whole book, or a few pages at a time, and be plenty amazed. The boisterous illustrations are informative and have a playful and functional layout. Facts are sometimes broken into boxes such as "Really Cool Science Bit" and "Brain Box." A few science projects (some serious and others not so) and some jokey warnings, "If you're going to build a nuclear reactor, get some ADULT supervision," are included. Overall, this is a title sure to find an audience, one that will gain a newfound respect for the elements.—Heather Acerro, Rochester Public Library, MN
Kirkus Reviews
A high school chemistry teacher takes a quick spin past the periodic table of elements, but he's not going to entice many passengers to come along for the ride. Not to say he doesn't try. With the same insouciance that lit up his text for Basher's Periodic Table: Elements with Style! (2010)--but also covering some of the same territory--Dingle highlights the central roles elements play in nature ("I'm Gonna Make You a Star"), technology ("Fun with Fireworks!") and our daily lives ("The Chemistry of Fizz-ics"). After opening with the full table and an explanation of its organization, though, he goes on to cover only a select few elements in any detail in the following single-topic spreads. Furthermore, teenage readers will likely find the breezy tone and loud colors babyish, but younger ones will bog down in the author's relatively knotty explanations of molecular structure and bonding, formulas describing chemical changes, and specialized terminology that is briefly defined in context but not included in either the glossary or index. Moreover, he plays fast and loose with his facts--pine cones are not "tree seeds," magnetic compasses do not point "due north," carbon dioxide is not found just in certain layers of the atmosphere, and stridently claiming that glass is not a liquid isn't the same as proving it. The author's evident enthusiasm for his subject provides plenty of revs, but the road's so rocky that his audience(s) will bail. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781771470087
Publisher:
Owlkids Books
Publication date:
10/15/2013
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
1,091,277
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
1010L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author


Adrian Dingle is a high school chemistry teacher and the creator of the award-winning website adriandingleschemistrypages.com, which has been recommended by the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse, the BBC, the NSTA, and Cornell Theory Centre. He is also the author of The Periodic Table: Elements with Style! Born in England, Dingle lives and teaches in Atlanta, Georgia.

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