How to Make Money as an Artist: The 7 Winning Strategies of Successful Fine Artists

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Overview

How to sell one’s art isn't taught in art schools, yet it’s an essential ingredient in getting work displayed and attracting art commissions. This straightforward guide is written for artists who want to present themselves and their work in the best possible light to the largest possible audience. Topics include creating a winning marketing package, getting a gallery, finding an artist representative, and obtaining free or low-cost advertising. Also included is a thorough resource listing that includes ...

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Overview

How to sell one’s art isn't taught in art schools, yet it’s an essential ingredient in getting work displayed and attracting art commissions. This straightforward guide is written for artists who want to present themselves and their work in the best possible light to the largest possible audience. Topics include creating a winning marketing package, getting a gallery, finding an artist representative, and obtaining free or low-cost advertising. Also included is a thorough resource listing that includes inexpensive sources for slide development, contact information for artist representatives, suggestions for durable mailing packaging, and contact names for foreign news media.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This book should be in every school of art, college art department, and artist’s pocket.” —V.A. Howard, author, Artistry: The Works of Artists and Learning by All Means: Lessons from the Arts
Library Journal
Talent, luck, and a capacity for relentless self-promotion are the foundations for a successful art career. Since luck is capricious and talent seems innate, Moore concentrates on techniques for marketing and promoting art work as perhaps the only aspect of an art career susceptible to improvement by reading self-help manuals. Moore details seven strategies: creating a marketing package, getting a gallery, joining art clubs, getting into juried shows, advertising, getting an art representative, and making prints. All of the chapters contain clear explanations and practical advice, but they will be most useful to those just entering the field. The short final listing of granting agencies, arts organizations, and publications should serve as a starting point to anyone researching the field but falls short of encyclopedic.--David McClelland, Philadelphia Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556524134
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/28/2000
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 1,417,112
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

Sean Moore has exhibited nationally for more than 30 years, and his paintings are hung in private and business collections. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.

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Read an Excerpt

Excerpted from How to Make Money as an Artist: The 7 Winning Strategies of Successful Fine Artists by Sean Moore. Copyright © 2000. All rights reserved.

Grants

An arts grant is a gift of money (not a loan) to an artist or arts group for the purpose of advancing the cause of the artist or group. The recipients of grants must do only three things:

1. Seek out these opportunities (research),

2. Prepare the proposals to apply for the grants, and

3. Spend the money when you win the award.

The difficulty of the first two is the reason that most artists don’t get grants. Another reason is that most artists think of the need for money as a general, overall, and constant need. To get a grant you must detail a specific need, for a particular purpose, with definite limits and a precise dollar amount. This requires planning and research.

It’s OK if the purpose is self-serving, such as mounting an exhibition, creating a work of art, producing a catalog or other printed piece about your art, or studying something in the arts. Your aim can also be altruistic, such as teaching at or creating art for an arts center that serves children in need or a small museum of ethnic art. As long as your project is well defined, costs a specific amount of money that you don’t have but need, and is something you are capable of, then you’re ready to apply for a grant.

When you research grants, try to narrow your search to those where the qualifications apply to you. Many grants are given only to certain kinds of artists, such as those from a particular region, age, sex, or ethnic background. Don’t waste your time applying for any grants where you aren’t a perfect fit.

After figuring out what activity you want a grant to support and how much this activity will cost, the rest of the application process is mostly writing. Writing a grant proposal can be a challenging task. They must be tightly written, pithy, precise, and follow directions exactly. Your library and bookstores are packed with guides on how to write grant proposals. If you can’t do it with the help of these excellent guides, you can hire a grant writer. (See grants in the Marketing Resources section.)

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Table of Contents

Introduction ix
1 Create a Winning Marketing Package 1
Your Biography 2
Your Resume 6
Layout 11
Slides and Photographs 13
Hiring a Professional or Art Student 14
Doing It Yourself 15
Format 16
After the Slides Are Done 17
Business Cards and Stationery 19
Business Cards 19
Stationery 21
News Releases and Press Clippings 24
Assembling Your Marketing Package 24
Brochure 26
Portfolio 27
2 Get a Gallery 31
How to Find Commercial Galleries Where You Live 32
How to Create and Narrow Your List of Galleries to Solicit 32
Introducing Yourself and Your Work to Selected Galleries 34
Attend Openings 34
Insider Trading 35
How to Know If You're Ready for a Commercial Gallery 35
What to Do When You Get a Gallery 37
What to Do When You Don't Get a Gallery 37
Co-Op Galleries 38
Vanity Galleries 39
Alternative Free Spaces 40
Some Less Obvious Venues 42
Protect Yourself 47
A Closing Note on Style 47
3 Join Art Clubs, Associations, and Organizations 49
How to Get the Most Out of Your Membership 51
Become a Member of Your Museum 53
4 Get into Juried Shows 55
Who's Running This Show Anyway? 55
How to Improve Your Odds of Getting into a Juried Show 59
Where to Find Calls for Entries 61
Magazines 61
Art Associations or Clubs 62
Art School or College or University Art Departments 62
Arts Council Newsletters 63
The Internet 63
Who's Making Money in a Juried Art Show? 63
How to Present Your Art When You Get into a Show 64
Frames 64
Use the Old Familiar Screw-Eyes and Wire to Hang Your Artwork 67
Sculpture Presentation 68
Lighting 68
Nameplates 69
5 Advertise for Free or Very Cheaply 73
Art Online 73
How to Get Your Own Free Web Site 75
4 Good Ways to Get Your Web Site Absolutely Free 75
How to Get in the Media: Advertising and Public Relations 78
How to Get Free Advertising Space 78
Public Relations 80
Mailing Lists 91
Sources of Mailing Lists 91
How to Streamline Your Mailing Process 92
Mailing Pieces 93
Bulletin Boards 95
Pamphlets and Brochures 95
Answering Machine 95
How to Double Your Response 96
6 Get an Art Representative to Work for You 99
Corporate Art Representatives 99
How to Find Art Representatives That Service Corporate Accounts 100
Art Print Representatives 101
Private Client Art Representatives 101
Art Association Sales and Rental Programs 101
Public Library Rental Program 102
7 Making Prints and Other Ways to Leverage Your Work 105
Slide Registries 105
Percentage for the Arts Program 106
Grants 106
Prints: How to Sell Your Art and Keep It at the Same Time 107
Do-It-Yourself Printing Options 109
Print Publishers 111
Conclusion 115
Marketing Resources for the Fine Artist 117
Index 141
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2010

    Perfect Guide for the Hard-Working Artist!

    How to Make Money as an Artist is an easy-to-use guide for the working artist. It presents a series of simple everyday steps that will help any artist overcome the popular notion that success in art is an all-or-nothing roll of the dice and to move up into a broad middle ground where most professional artists live, work and make money. In addition to his over thirty years as a painter, Sean Moore's background as an advertising art director, graphic designer, and director of marketing provides tips and clear budget-conscious directions for creating your own graphic business cards, ads, and smart-looking brochures to promote and sell your art. Straightforward instruction on how to get in shows, how to get in galleries and join arts clubs, how to ready your artwork for showing and how to do your own basic public relations for those showings. Excellent both as a starter kit for the emerging artist as well as an oft-needed jump-start for the experienced hand.

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