How to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant's Companion: The Original Cocktail Guide

How to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant's Companion: The Original Cocktail Guide

by Jerry Thomas
     
 

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First published in 1862, this seminal work in bartending marks the first time many of today's classics were recorded in print. Collected here by Jerry Thomas—America’s most famous bartender—are dozens of cocktail recipes, from old standards to mixes invented by Thomas himself, including his trademark drink, The Blue Blazer. Guides for mixing drinks

Overview

First published in 1862, this seminal work in bartending marks the first time many of today's classics were recorded in print. Collected here by Jerry Thomas—America’s most famous bartender—are dozens of cocktail recipes, from old standards to mixes invented by Thomas himself, including his trademark drink, The Blue Blazer. Guides for mixing drinks of all categories—including sours, fizzes, and highballs—are included along with instructions on using various bartending tools, from jiggers to ponies and beyond. With a glossary to help all bon vivants remember their demijohns from their drachms, this is a nostalgic and delicious homage to a drinking era that is gone but not forgotten.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781843911982
Publisher:
Hesperus Press
Publication date:
02/01/2010
Series:
Hesperus Classics Series
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
429,070
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

How to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant's Companion


By Jerry Thomas

Hesperus Press Limited

Copyright © 2010 Jerry Thomas
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-84391-716-8



CHAPTER 1

PUNCH


To make punch of any sort in perfection, the ambrosial essence of the lemon must be extracted by rubbing lumps of sugar on the rind, which breaks the delicate little vessels that contain the essence, and at the same time absorbs it. This, and making the mixture sweet and strong, using tea instead of water, and thoroughly amalgamating all the compounds, so that the taste of neither the bitter, the sweet, the spirit, nor the element, shall be perceptible one over the other, is the grand secret, only to be acquired by practice.

In making hot toddy, or hot punch, you must put in the spirits before the water: in cold punch, grog, etc., the other way.

The precise proportions of spirit and water, or even of the acidity and sweetness, can have no general rule, as scarcely two persons make punch alike.


1

BRANDY PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One teaspoon of raspberry syrup
Two tablespoons of white sugar
One wineglass of water
One and one-half wineglasses of brandy
One-half small-sized lemon
Two slices of orange
One piece of pineapple


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and dress the top with berries in season. Sip through a straw.


2

BRANDY PUNCH

For a party of twenty


One gallon of water
Three quarts of brandy
One-half pint of Jamaica rum
Two pounds of sugar
Juice of six lemons
Ice, and add berries in season
Three oranges sliced
One pineapple, pared, and cut up
One gill of curaçao
Two gills of raspberry syrup


Mix the materials well together in a large bowl, and you have a splendid punch.


3

MISSISSIPPI PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One wineglass of brandy
One-half wineglass of Jamaica rum
One-half wineglass of Bourbon whiskey
One and one-half tablespoons of powdered white sugar
One-quarter of a large lemon
One-half wineglass of water
Fill a tumbler with shaved ice


The above must be well shaken, and to those who like their draughts 'like linked sweetness long drawn out', let them use a glass tube or straw to sip the nectar through. The top of this punch should be ornamented with small pieces of orange, and berries in season.


4

HOT BRANDY AND RUM PUNCH

For a party of fifteen


One quart of Jamaica rum
One quart of Cognac brandy
One pound of white loaf sugar
Four lemons
Three quarts of boiling water
One teaspoon of nutmeg


Rub the sugar over the lemons until it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skins, then put the sugar into a punchbowl; add the ingredients well together, pour over them the boiling water, stir well together; add the rum, brandy and nutmeg; mix thoroughly, and the punch will be ready to serve. As we have before said, it is very important, in making good punch, that all the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated; and, to ensure success, the process of mixing must be diligently attended to. Allow a quart for four persons; but this information must be taken cum grano salis; for the capacities of persons for this kind of beverage are generally supposed to vary considerably.


5

SCOTCH WHISKY PUNCH


Steep the thin yellow shavings of lemon peel in the whisky, which should be of the best quality; the sugar should be dissolved in boiling water. As it requires genius to make whisky punch, it would be impertinent to give proportions.


6

WHISKEY PUNCH


One wineglass of whiskey (Irish or Scotch)
Sugar to taste
Two wineglasses of boiling water


Dissolve the sugar well with one wineglass of the water, then pour in the whiskey, and add the balance of the water. Sweeten to taste, and put in a small piece of lemon rind, or a thin slice of lemon.


7

COLD WHISKEY PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of powdered white sugar dissolved in a little water
Juice of half a small lemon
One and one-half wineglasses of Irish or Scotch whiskey


Fill the glass with shaved ice, shake well, and dress the top with two thin slices of lemon, and berries in season. Serve with a straw.

This beverage ought always to be made with boiling water, and allowed to concoct and cool for a day or two before it is put on the table. In this way, the materials get more intensely amalgamated than cold water and cold whiskey ever get. As to the beautiful mutual adaptation of cold rum and cold water, that is beyond all praise, being one of nature's most exquisite achievements.


8

IRISH WHISKEY PUNCH


This is the genuine Irish beverage. It is generally made one-third pure whiskey, and two-thirds boiling water, in which the sugar has been dissolved. If lemon punch, the rind is rubbed on the sugar, and a small proportion of juice added before the whiskey is poured in.

Irish whiskey is not fit to drink until it is three years old.


9

GIN PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of raspberry syrup
Two tablespoons of white sugar
One and one-half wineglasses of gin
One-half of a small-sized lemon
Two slices of orange
One piece of pineapple
One wineglass of water


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice. Shake well, and ornament the top with berries in season. Sip through a glass tube or straw.


10

GIN PUNCH

From a recipe by Soyer


One-half pint of old gin
One gill of maraschino
The juice of two lemons
The rind of half a lemon
Four ounces of syrup
One quart bottle of German seltzer water
Ice well


11

CHAMPAGNE PUNCH


One quart bottle of wine
One quarter pound of sugar
One orange, sliced
The juice of a lemon
Three slices of pineapple
One wineglass of raspberry or strawberry syrup
Ornament with fruits in season, and serve in champagne goblets


This can be made in any quantity by observing the proportions of the ingredients as given above. Four bottles of wine make a gallon, and a gallon is generally sufficient for fifteen persons in a mixed party. For a good champagne punch, see Rocky Mountain Punch, No. 43.


12

SHERRY PUNCH

Use large bar glass


Two wineglasses of sherry
One tablespoon of sugar
Two or three slices of orange
Two or three slices of lemon


Fill tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and ornament with berries in season. Sip through a straw.


13

CLARET PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One and one-half tablespoons of sugar
Two or three slices of orange One slice of lemon


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, and then pour in your claret, shake well, and ornament with berries in season. Place a straw in the glass. To make a quantity of claret punch, see Imperial Punch, No. 41.


14

SAUTERNE PUNCH

Use large bar glass


The same as claret punch, using sauterne instead of claret.


15

PORT WINE PUNCH

Use large bar glass


The same as claret punch, using port wine instead of claret, and ornament with berries in season.


16

VANILLA PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of sugar
One wineglass of brandy
The juice of one-quarter of a lemon


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, ornament with one or two slices of lemon, and flavor with a few drops of vanilla extract.

This is a delicious drink, and should be imbibed through a glass tube or straw.


17

PINEAPPLE PUNCH

For a party of ten


Four bottles of champagne
One pint of Jamaica rum
One pint of brandy
One gill of curaçao
Juice of four lemons
Four pineapples sliced
Sweeten to taste with pulverized white sugar


Put the pineapple with one pound of sugar in a glass bowl, and let them stand until the sugar is well soaked in the pineapple, then add all the other ingredients, except the champagne. Let this mixture stand in ice for about an hour, then add the champagne. Place a large block of ice in the center of the bowl, and ornament it with loaf sugar, sliced orange, and other fruits in season.

Serve in champagne glasses.

Pineapple punch is sometimes made by adding sliced pineapple to brandy punch.


18

ORGEAT PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One and one-half tablespoons of orgeat syrup
One and one-half wineglasses of brandy
Juice of one-half a lemon, and fill the tumbler with shaved ice


Shake well, ornament with berries in season, and dash port wine on top.

Place the straw as in a mint julep.


19

CURAÇAO PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of sugar
One wineglass of brandy
One-half wineglass of Jamaica rum
One wineglass of water
One-half pony glass of curaçao
The juice of half a lemon


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and ornament with fruits of the season. Sip the nectar through a straw.


20

ROMAN PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of sugar
One tablespoon of raspberry syrup
One teaspoon of curaçao
One wineglass of Jamaica rum
One-half wineglass of brandy
The juice of half a lemon


Fill with shaved ice, shake well, dash with port wine, and ornament with fruits in season. Imbibe through a straw.


21

MILK PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One tablespoon of fine white sugar
Two tablespoons of water
One wineglass of Cognac brandy
One-half wineglass of Santa Cruz rum
One-third tumblerful of shaved ice


Fill with milk, shake the ingredients well together, and grate a little nutmeg on top.


22

HOT MILK PUNCH

Use large bar glass


This punch is made the same as No. 21, with the exception that hot milk is used, and no ice.


23

MANHATTAN MILK PUNCH


Same as the following cold milk punch, with the addition of five drops of aromatic tincture.


24

EGG MILK PUNCH

Use large bar glass


One teaspoon of fine white sugar
One wineglass of brandy
One-fourth wineglass of Santa Cruz rum
One egg
Small lump of ice


Fill the glass with pure fresh milk, shake the ingredients well together, and strain into a large glass.


25

ENGLISH MILK PUNCH


Put the following ingredients into a very clean pitcher, viz.:

The juice of six lemons
The rind of two lemons
One pound of sugar
One pineapple, peeled, sliced and pounded
One gill of arrack
One quart of boiling water
One small stick of cinnamon
One pint of brandy
One pint of rum
Twenty coriander seeds
Six cloves
One cup of strong green tea


The boiling water to be added last; cork this down to prevent evaporation, and allow these ingredients to steep for at least six hours; then add a quart of hot milk and the juice of two lemons; mix, and filter through a jelly-bag; and when the punch has passed bright, put it away in tight-corked bottles. This punch is intended to be iced for drinking.


26

ENGLISH MILK PUNCH


Another method

This seductive and nectareous drink can also be made by the directions herewith given:

To two quarts of water add one quart of milk. Mix one quart of old Jamaica rum with two of French brandy, and put the spirit to the milk, stirring it for a short time; let it stand for an hour, but do not suffer anyone of delicate appetite to see the melange in its present state as the sight might create a distaste for the punch when perfected. Filter through blotting paper into bottles; and should you find that the liquid is cloudy, when it should not be, you may clarify it by adding a small portion of isinglass to each bottle. The above recipe will furnish you with half a dozen of punch.


27

PUNCH À LA FORD


A recipe from Benson E. Hill, Esq., author of The Epicure's Almanac


'The late General Ford, who for many years was the commanding engineer at Dover, kept a most hospitable board, and used to make punch on a large scale, after the following method:

'He would select three dozen of lemons, the coats of which were smooth, and whose rinds were not too thin; these he would peel with a sharp knife into a large earthen vessel, taking care that none of the rind should be detached but that portion in which the cells are placed, containing the essential oil; when he had completed the first part of the process, he added two pounds of lump sugar, and stirred the peel and sugar together with an oar-shaped piece of wood, for nearly half an hour, thereby extracting a greater quantity of the essential oil. Boiling water was next poured into the vessel, and the whole well stirred, until the sugar was completely dissolved. The lemons were then cut and squeezed, the juice strained from the kernels; these were placed in a separate jug, and boiling water poured upon them, the general being aware that the pips were enveloped in a thick mucilage, full of flavor; half the lemon juice was now thrown in; and as soon as the kernels were free from their transparent coating, their liquor was strained and added.

'The sherbet was now tasted, more acid or more sugar applied as required, and care taken not to render the lemonade too watery. "Rich of the fruit, and plenty of sweetness," was the General's maxim. The sherbet was then measured, and to every three quarts a pint of Cognac brandy and a pint of old Jamaica rum were allotted, the spirit being well stirred as poured in; bottling immediately followed, and, when completed, the beverage was kept in a cold cellar, or tank, till required. At the General's table I have frequently drunk punch thus made, more than six months old; and found it much improved by time and a cool atmosphere.'


28

PUNCH JELLY


Make a good bowl of punch, à la Ford, already described. To every pint of punch add an ounce and a half of isinglass, dissolved in a quarter of a pint of water (about half a tumbler full); pour this into the punch whilst quite hot, and then fill your molds, taking care that they are not disturbed until the jelly is completely set.

Orange, lemon, or calf's-foot jelly, not used at dinner, can be converted into punch jelly for the evening, by following the above directions, only taking care to omit a portion of the acid prescribed in making the sherbet.

This preparation is a very agreeable refreshment on a cold night, but should be used in moderation; the strength of the punch is so artfully concealed by its admixture with the gelatine, that many persons, particularly of the softer sex, have been tempted to partake so plentifully of it as to render them somewhat unfit for waltzing or quadrilling after supper.


29

GLASGOW PUNCH


From a recipe in the possession of Dr Shelton Mackenzie

Melt lump sugar in cold water, with the juice of a couple of lemons, passed through a fine hair-strainer. This is sherbet, and must be well mingled. Then add old Jamaica rum – one part of rum to five of sherbet. Cut a couple of limes in two, and run each section rapidly around the edge of the jug or bowl, gently squeezing in some of the delicate acid. This done, the punch is made. Imbibe.


30

REGENT'S PUNCH


For a party of twenty

Three bottles of champagne
One bottle of Hockheimer
One bottle of curaçao
One bottle of Cognac
Four pounds of bloom raisins
One half-bottle of Jamaica rum
Two bottles of Madeira
Two bottles of seltzer, or plain soda water


To which add oranges, lemons, rock candy, and instead of water, green tea to taste. Refrigerate with all the icy power of the Arctic.


31

REGENT'S PUNCH


Another recipe

From The Bordeaux Wine and Liquor Guide

One and one-half pint each of strong hot green tea, lemon juice, and capillaire
One bottle of champagne
One pint each of rum, brandy, arrack, and curaçao

Mix, and place a slice of pineapple into it.


32

RASPBERRY PUNCH


From The Bordeaux Wine and Liquor Guide

One and one-half gill of raspberry juice, or vinegar
Three and one-half pints of boiling water
Three-quarters of a pound of lump sugar


Infuse half an hour, strain, add one-half pint of porter, three-quarters to one pint, each, of rum and brandy (or either one and one-half to two pints), and add more water and sugar, if desired weaker or sweeter. A liqueur glass of curaçao, noyau, or maraschino improves it.


33

NATIONAL GUARD
7TH REGIMENT PUNCH


Use large bar glass

One tablespoon of sugar
The juice of a quarter of a lemon
One wineglass of brandy
One wineglass of Catawba wine
Flavor with raspberry syrup


Fill the glass with shaved ice. Shake and mix thoroughly, then ornament with slices of orange, pineapple, and berries in season, and dash with Jamaica rum. This delicious beverage should be imbibed through a straw.


34

ST CHARLES' PUNCH


Use large bar glass

One tablespoon of sugar
One wineglass of port wine
One pony of brandy
The juice of one-fourth of a lemon


Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, ornament with fruits in season, and serve with a straw.


35

69TH REGIMENT PUNCH


In earthen mug

One-half wineglass of Irish whiskey
One-half wineglass of Scotch whisky
One piece of lemon
One teaspoon of sugar
Two wineglasses of hot water

This is a capital punch for a cold night.


36

LOUISIANA SUGAR OUSE PUNCH


From a recipe in the possession of Colonel T.B. Thorpe

To one quart of boiling syrup, taken from the kettles, add whiskey or brandy to suit the patient. Flavor with the juice of sour oranges.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from How to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas. Copyright © 2010 Jerry Thomas. Excerpted by permission of Hesperus Press Limited.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Jerry Thomas (1830–1885) is considered "the father of American mixology" because of his pioneering work in popularizing cocktails and in establishing showmanship and creativity as part of bartending. 

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