How to Raise Your Parents: A Teen Girl's Survival Guide

How to Raise Your Parents: A Teen Girl's Survival Guide

3.6 14
by Sarah O'Leary Burningham, Bella Pilar
     
 

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Being a teen (or the parent of a teen) doesn't have to be so hard. How to Raise Your Parents will help teens and their parents navigate those years between training bras and keys to the family car. In a voice teens will relate to and parents will appreciate, author Sarah O'Leary Burningham offers smart advice about negotiation and parental hot buttons and a

Overview

Being a teen (or the parent of a teen) doesn't have to be so hard. How to Raise Your Parents will help teens and their parents navigate those years between training bras and keys to the family car. In a voice teens will relate to and parents will appreciate, author Sarah O'Leary Burningham offers smart advice about negotiation and parental hot buttons and a little insight about what the world looks like from a parent's point of view.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"

How to Raise Your Parents is brilliant - I wish I had a guide like this when I was a teenager...It's a terrific book. Clever and funny - and honestly helpful without being condescending or fake." Lauren Myracle, bestselling teen author of ttfn, ttyl, and l8r g8r"

This book tackles difficult topics with wit and wisdom. It speaks honestly and openly to teens about the challenges of being an adolescent in today's world." Kathryn Della-Piana, LCSW, Exec. Director, Family Counseling Center"

[A] wise and witty work for smart teenage girls. The result should be that both parent and teen feel they can be heard and respected, even where there is disagreement." Penny Brooke Jameson, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist"

In turning the tables, Burningham gets readers to see things from an adult's perspective and offers advice on how to negotiate so that the two generations can happily coexist as a family....[S]he's a very hip adult who makes sense, and teens just might want to listen to her." School Library Journal

Publishers Weekly

Burningham, a publicist for a New York-based publisher, starts out strong in this book of advice to the adolescent. "Know your parent" is her first bit of wisdom, and to this end she offers a witty set of profiles of the Hippie, the Schoolmarm, the Teen Wannabe, etc.; usefully, she identifies the parental types who fly off the handle and the types who are overprotective, then supplies coping strategies. Elsewhere, it's a mixed bag. Some of her counsel is welcome (how to handle a broken curfew or other misdemeanor); some is superfluous (if you hear your parents' footsteps, stop making out); and some just doesn't fly (if parents won't sanction one-on-one dating, girls should invite the boy over: "And after spending some time with them, your boyfriend will probably think your family is cool-just one more reason you're such a catch!"). Much of the best advice, including Burningham's tactics for negotiating in general, presumes a maturity on the part of readers-but if they can internalize her words, they'll be set for life. Ages 13-up. (May)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
VOYA
This whimsical, illustrated guide, written to help teens get along with their parents-and to win more battles than they lose-opens with the premise that parents fall into five categories: the hippie, the schoolmarm, the teen wannabe, the yuppie, and the sibling activist. Teens are helped to determine with which parental type they live and urged to avoid actions that typically incur the wrath of their particular version. They are also pointed toward type-specific conciliation strategies that might minimize an inevitable punishment or help the teen win her case. An entire chapter is devoted to negotiation, and others to possible friction areas, such as teen privacy, sex and friends, tattoos and other manifestations of independence, curfews, academic work, driving, money, and Internet issues. The final chapter provides a key to decoding "parentspeak." For example, "How's school?" means, "Please tell me anything about your life. Anything.ö Burningham writes in a breezy style that might help her connect with teens, although some will find the slang overdone or archaic in spots. From this adult reviewer's perspective, much of the advice is sound. It is usually wise to avoid lying and accept the consequences when one is caught red-handed, for example. Some teens may welcome such counsel; others will dismiss Burningham as a teen wannabe cajoling them into playing by adult rules. School guidance counselors could find it a useful book to share with students, and well-intentioned parents might leave it around the house to be discovered by their offspring. Reviewer: Mary E. Heslin
KLIATT - Sherri Forgash Ginsberg
There are plenty of books out there to show parents how to raise their children and teenagers; there are only a few that give a teenager guidance on how to raise their parents. Is this book necessary? Absolutely. First, it asks the teenager to place her parents in a category. (Hopefully they will both fit into the same one or it will get a little complicated.) These include the hippie, schoolmarm, teen wannabe, yuppie, sibling activist and total control freak. Once the reader is able to pigeonhole her parent in a category, there are instructions on how to behave accordingly. If all else fails, and it proves too difficult to figure out those "rents," then there is a quiz to facilitate the answer. Chapter Two gives excellent ideas on how to negotiate with parents, and Chapter Three teaches the reader how to gain some privacy. Chapters Four, Five and Six deal eloquently with tedious issues such as curfews and expressing independence, as well as dating without everyone totally freaking out about it. Chapter Seven is all about high school, grades and how to avoid being one of the three worst students in the world—Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs and Pablo Picasso. Chapter Eight is about the dreaded driver's license and all that entails; Nine and Ten round up information about jobs and living in a cyberspace world. This is an essential book for all libraries. Reviewer: Sherri Forgash Ginsberg
School Library Journal

Gr 7-11- This illustrated guide gives parents the upper hand, even if pretends otherwise. In turning the tables, Burningham gets readers to see things from an adult's perspective and offers advice on how to negotiate so that the two generations can happily coexist as a family. More conventional than its quirky title and tone suggest, the book provides rational advice such as avoiding lying and accepting the consequences when caught red-handed. Chapters also cover topics such as jobs, getting a driver's license, and cyber-life. The fun, magazine look of the book, which categorizes parents into five types (and provides questions for readers to determine which type they have) and decodes "parentspeak," will no doubt connect with teens. Burningham is clearly an adult talking ("Parents don't like ultimatums...," "If you really want your parents to hear you, you have to treat them like real people"), but she's a very hip adult who makes sense, and teens just might want to listen to her.-Sarah O'Holla, Village Community School, New York City

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811856966
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
03/26/2008
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Sarah O'Leary Burningham was inspired to write this book when she was 16 years old. She lives in Manhattan. This is her first book.

Bella Pilar's strong ties to fashion began with work in visual display and a career as a makeup artist before going on to her true love, illustration. Bella was trained in art and fashion at both Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and Massachusetts College of Art in Boston.

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How to Raise Your Parents: A Teen Girl's Survival Guide 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before you were born, your parents probably read books like ¿What To Expect When You¿re Expecting¿, among other parenting books and magazines. You¿re still here so they obviously worked but now you¿re a teenager. You want a cellphone. You want to go on a date. You want FREEDOM. But your parents hold the key to all of it and they don¿t want to give it you. How To Raise Your Parents is a how-to guide to convincing your parents why you really do need a cell phone, learing ¿Parent Lingo¿, and avoiding future embarrassment the next time your boyfriend come over. I found How To Raise Your Parents a hilarious book. Many of the tatics explained seem like they might actually work and I¿ve actually tried a few of them. Sarah talks directly to the teen reader as she explains everything and it¿s written in a style that I¿m sure every teen would enjoy. So whether or not you feel the need to train your parents, I suggest you pick up a copy of How To Raise Your Parents when you see it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PUBERTY IS DIGUSTING I DO NOT WANT IT TO HAPPEN THIS BOOK IS TOO MUCH FOR ME REPLY TO FOOP POOP IF YOU AGREE
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lol it totally relates to your inner parent and the you what to do
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 8th grade science teacher recommended this book and after reading it i underatand why.. INCREDIBLE! TRE ADRABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Wonder ful and genious! Love this book
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My grandparents who ae mor like parents than grandpatents seem to be way to protective of me they never let me stay home alone and the have basically said the only way i wwill ever go to a public school is over their dead bodies bur i love them do u think u can help me understand why they are so protective. Reply to Christian Girl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love is book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reply: to pussycat Eiter you have a problem wih your parents, or you just cant decide whats wrong with you where your parents put up so many bounderies!
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Ever wonder what your mom or dad is thinking when they won't let you walk out of the house in a perfectly good outfit? Or how about when they come up with some crazy rule that doesn't make any sense?

And parents, what is your teen thinking when they choose a ropes course adventure summer camp over horseback riding? And what about those "trashy" books they read?

Welcome to the world of raising a parent....or, I mean, raising a teen?

Sarah O'Leary Burningham uses a voice both funny and charming to reach out to parents and teens. She recognizes the strengths and merits of both units and tries to highlight and outline ways that teens and parents can work together to overcome communication obstacles.

Be sure to check out the funny way that she does this for teens with her "parent profiles."