How to Read Texts: A Student Guide to Critical Approaches and Skills / Edition 1

How to Read Texts: A Student Guide to Critical Approaches and Skills / Edition 1

by Neil McCaw
     
 

How to Read Texts introduces key critical approaches to literary texts and offers a practical introduction for students developing their own critical and close-reading skills. Written in a lively, jargon-free style, it explains critical concepts, approaches and ideas including: debates around critical theory, the role of history and context, the links between

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Overview

How to Read Texts introduces key critical approaches to literary texts and offers a practical introduction for students developing their own critical and close-reading skills. Written in a lively, jargon-free style, it explains critical concepts, approaches and ideas including: debates around critical theory, the role of history and context, the links between creativity and criticism, the relationship between author, reader and text.

Practical examples, readings, exercises and 'checkpoints' help students to work on their own readings of both primary and secondary texts and to explore the links between critical and creative writing. The book enables students to gain confidence in their critical readings of a variety of texts and encourages them to challenge the assumptions behind other critics' readings. How to Read Texts is an indispensable guide for any English student who wants to develop their reading of literary and critical texts.

About the Author:
Neil McCaw is Senior Lecturer in English & Creative Writing at the University of Winchester, UK

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826492883
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Publication date:
05/21/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.36(d)

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Why read about how to read? 1

1 Beginning from where you are - finding your critical voice 10

2 The creative critic 24

3 Close reading 42

4 Biography and authorship 64

5 History and contexts 81

6 Critical theory 103

Conclusion: Unveiling the self-conscious critic 126

App. A Edgar Allan Poe, 'The Tell-Tale Heart' 130

App. B William Blake, 'The Tyger' 134

App. C Arthur Conan Doyle, 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' 135

Notes 155

Bibliography 160

Index 162

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