How to Roast a Lamb: New Greek Classic Cooking [NOOK Book]

Overview

A rising star in the food world, Michael Psilakis is co-owner of a growing empire of modern Mediterranean restaurants, and one of the most exciting young chefs in America today. In How to Roast a Lamb, the self-taught chef offers recipes from his restaurants and his home in this, his much-anticipated first cookbook.  Ten chapters provide colorful and heartfelt personal essays that lead into thematically related recipes. Gorgeous color photography accompanies many of the recipes throughout.  Psilakis's ...
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How to Roast a Lamb: New Greek Classic Cooking

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Overview

A rising star in the food world, Michael Psilakis is co-owner of a growing empire of modern Mediterranean restaurants, and one of the most exciting young chefs in America today. In How to Roast a Lamb, the self-taught chef offers recipes from his restaurants and his home in this, his much-anticipated first cookbook.  Ten chapters provide colorful and heartfelt personal essays that lead into thematically related recipes. Gorgeous color photography accompanies many of the recipes throughout.  Psilakis's cooking utilizes the fresh, naturally healthful ingredients of the Mediterranean augmented by techniques that define New American cuisine. Home cooks who have gravitated toward Italian cookbooks for the simple, user-friendly dishes, satisfying flavors, and comfortable, family-oriented meals, will welcome Psilakis's approach to Greek food, which is similarly healthful, affordable, and satisfying to share any night of the week. 
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Psilakis, highly acclaimed chef and owner of New York City's Kefi and Anthos, honors Greek cuisine in this nostalgic and charming book. More than a collection of recipes, this book is a celebration of Greek culture and its extraordinary effect on the author. Each section begins with a personal story demonstrating how his love of food was ingrained in him. The recipes that follow are organized by the foods tied to the experiences he describes. “My Father's Garden” pays homage to the family garden and includes a tantalizing recipe for sweet and sour eggplant and onion stew. “Open Water” includes grilled swordfish with tomato-braised cauliflower, and “Kefi—A Time to Dance” offers fried pork and beef meatballs and a variety of spreads including chickpea with roasted pepper and feta. Psilakis recounts a moving story about raising a young lamb and kid, resulting in recipes for both roasted leg of lamb and braised goat. The author includes a helpful list of ingredients for those less familiar with Greek cuisine and offers optional shortcuts, such as using high-quality prepared ingredients to aid those pressed for time. Complete with full color photographs of many dishes and numerous black and white family photos, the work enables readers to embrace not only Greek cuisine but its culture as well. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Award-winning chef Psilakis co-owns four Manhattan restaurants, including Anthos (the only Greek restaurant in the United States to be awarded the Michelin Star). His first cookbook serves 150 dishes (salads, stews, meat dishes, and sauces and spreads) and offers tips on where to buy hard-to-find Greek ingredients and suggested substitutions (drained whole-milk yogurt in place of Greek yogurt). Although clearly written, recipes are aimed at more experienced cooks who know how to "sear" and "deglaze a pot." Psilakis's personal essays add context to the recipes and make his book a treat for foodies who enjoy getting to know famous chefs. Novice cooks will prefer Theoni Pappar's more accessible Greek Cooking for Everyone.
Esquire
Chef of the Year.

November 2007

Food and Wine
Best New Chef.

April 2008

Bon Appetit Magazine Editors
Chef of the Year.

October 2008

Gourmet
New York City goes Greek...but no-one does it as luminously as Michael Psilakis.
August 2007
Time Out New York
"Michael Psilakis elevates Greek cuisine to Olympian heights."
New York Magazine
The cooking [at Anthos] establishes Michael Psilakis as the Mario Batali of nouvelle Aegean cuisine.

January 2008

InsatiableCritic.com - Gael Greene
Be seduced by chef Michael Psilakis, passionate son and champion of Greece. Fired by his philosophy of kefi-the transcendence of celebration-he has forever changed our experience of Greek cooking.
New York Magazine - January 2008
"The cooking [at Anthos] establishes Michael Psilakis as the Mario Batali of nouvelle Aegean cuisine."
author of Vegetable Love, from the Foreword - Barbara Kafka
Anyone who reads this book-a delight of love and memory-will have a treasure trove of excellent and original recipes.
InsatiableCritic.com
Be seduced by chef Michael Psilakis, passionate son and champion of Greece. Fired by his philosophy of kefi-the transcendence of celebration-he has forever changed our experience of Greek cooking.
Paula Wolfert
Here's a Greek cookbook as warm and welcoming as the Greeks themselves...filled with wonderful family stories, rewarding insights, and, last but not least, utterly delicious recipes. Bravo!
Esquire food and travel columnist and author of The Encyclopedia of American Food & Drink - John Mariani
Michael Psilakis is a true original. While respecting the savory traditions of Greek cookery, he has been able to refine it into a modern global cuisine. How to Roast a Lamb gives the home cook every indication of just how wonderful Greek-American food can be.
From the Publisher
Michael has single-handedly transformed the Western idea of Greek food as we know it. He deserves every bit of the attention he's gotten. The future is his.—Anthony Bourdain

Anyone who reads this book-a delight of love and memory-will have a treasure trove of excellent and original recipes.—Barbara Kafka, author of Vegetable Love, from the Foreword

Be seduced by chef Michael
Psilakis, passionate son and champion of Greece. Fired by his philosophy of kefi-the transcendence of celebration-he has forever changed our experience of Greek cooking.—Gael Greene, InsatiableCritic.com

Here's a Greek cookbook as warm and welcoming as the Greeks themselves...filled with wonderful family stories, rewarding insights, and, last but not least, utterly delicious recipes. Bravo!—Paula Wolfert, author of Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking, Mediterranean Grains and Greens, and The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen

Michael Psilakis is a true original. While respecting the savory traditions of Greek cookery, he has been able to refine it into a modern global cuisine. How to Roast a Lamb gives the home cook every indication of just how wonderful Greek-American food can be.—John Mariani, Esquire food and travel columnist and author of The Encyclopedia of American Food & Drink

"Chef of the Year."—Esquire, November 2007

"Best New Chef."
Food and Wine, April 2008

"Chef of the Year."
Bon Appetit, October 2008

"New York City goes Greek...but no-one does it as luminously as Michael Psilakis."—Gourmet, August 2007

"Michael Psilakis elevates Greek cuisine to Olympian heights."
Time Out New York"The cooking [at Anthos] establishes Michael Psilakis as the Mario Batali of nouvelle Aegean cuisine."
New York Magazine, January 2008

Bon Appetit - October 2008
"Chef of the Year."
Anthony Bourdain
Michael has single-handedly transformed the Western idea of Greek food as we know it. He deserves every bit of the attention he's gotten. The future is his.
InsatiableCritic.com Gael Greene
Be seduced by chef Michael
Psilakis, passionate son and champion of Greece. Fired by his philosophy of kefi-the transcendence of celebration-he has forever changed our experience of Greek cooking.
Esquire - November 2007

"Chef of the Year."
Food and Wine - April 2008
"Best New Chef."
Esquire food and travel columnist and author of Th John Mariani
Michael Psilakis is a true original. While respecting the savory traditions of Greek cookery, he has been able to refine it into a modern global cuisine. How to Roast a Lamb gives the home cook every indication of just how wonderful Greek-American food can be.
Gourmet - August 2007
"New York City goes Greek...but no-one does it as luminously as Michael Psilakis."
The Barnes & Noble Review
Part memoir, part instructional recipe collection, Michael Psilakis' book is more personal and unabashedly sentimental than most cookbooks. He describes not just his trajectory to celebrated chef from waiting tables at a T.G.I. Friday's, where he met his wife, but offers a gushing tribute to his late father, who "taught me how to hunt, garden, fish, and how to kill and skin a goat" -- and compete in Cretan dancing.

In the past decade, Psilakis has become one of the Olympians of the New York culinary world. His upscale midtown Manhattan restaurant, Anthos, is the only Michelin-star-rated Greek restaurant in America, while his recession-proof, crowd-pleasing Upper West Side taverna, Kefi, draws hordes hungry for his souvlaki, tzatziki, and grilled octopus. His first cookbook reflects this breadth, ranging from the healthful, convivial, Cretan-inflected family-style cooking he learned from his mother while growing up in a Greek culture bubble on Long Island, to the complex, new Greek haute cuisine he has evolved from the classics for Anthos. Despite its carnivorous title, How to Roast a Lamb offers plenty of vegetarian dishes along with meats and fish, but -- sweets lovers be warned -- no desserts.

Psilakis opens with down-to-earth, manageable recipes such as Artichokes and Potato or Grilled Swordfish with Tomato-Braised Cauliflower, and builds to the more adventuresome, elaborate Anthos offerings. Poached Halibut with Cypriot Shellfish Salad, Cucumber-Yogurt Broth, and Caviar, for example, requires dozens of ingredients and multiple processes. It's fascinating to see what goes into these sophisticated compositions, though the Braised Quail with Fennel and Apricots is more my speed. I only wish he'd included a recipe for his Duck Gyros with Golden Raisin Marmalade and Caramelized Onions. Perhaps in his next book. --Heller McAlpin

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316071734
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 10/28/2009
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 20 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

A long time front-of-house man with no professional cooking experience, Michael Psilakis took control of the kitchen when, as owner of his Long Island restaurant, Ecco, his chef simply failed to show up for work one night. Since then, his star as a chef and entrepreneur has risen considerably. He now owns three restaurants in Manhattan—Anthos, a showcase for his modern take on fine Greek dining; Kefi, a cozier spot that serves the more classic home cooking he grew up on; and, Mia Dona, a new Italian restaurant with a Greek bent.Psilakis lives in New York.

Barbara Kafka is the author of Vegetable Love, Roasting: A Simple Art, Party Food, Soup: A Way of Life, and the New York Times bestseller Microwave Gourmet. Vegetable Love was winner of the 2006 IACP award for Best Single Subject Cookbook. She was a regular contributor to the New York Times and has written extensively for food magazines in the United States, Great Britain, and Australia, andwas recently honored with the James Beard Foundation lifetime achievement award.She lives in New York and Vermont.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 30, 2009

    New Greek Classic Cooking

    This is a beautifully done hardcover cookbook with a dust jacket. The cookbook has 288 pages and eleven chapters. The author prefaces each chapter with stories and photographs from his childhood that tie into the theme of each chapter and explain his love for cooking.

    There are a total of one hundred and fifty recipes and many black and white and color photographs throughout the book. Many of the recipes feature meats some of us might not be familiar cooking with including pheasant, rabbit, venison, lamb and goat. Being a Greek cookbook, there are many seafood recipes as well. You will also find chicken and beef recipes and several vegetarian recipes. I was a bit disappointed that there were not more pastry and dessert recipes since I have a huge sweet tooth.

    Each recipe lists the recipe title in Greek and English, a short paragraph with a bit of information about the recipe, a full ingredient list and of course directions. The directions are well written and very easy to follow for the novice or more experienced cook.

    For those not familiar with Greek cooking, the author includes information about the ingredients. For example, he explains the various cheeses, oils and olives he uses in the recipes. He also offers suggestions for substitutions if you can't find some of the Greek foods at your supermarket.

    This is a great cookbook for anyone interested in Greek cooking and it would be the perfect gift for those that enjoy reading their cookbooks cover to cover. I'm looking forward to trying the Beef Stew with Leeks and the Stewed English Peas and Mushrooms

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2012

    This stinks like rotten, rotten cheese.

    Doesnt deserve the one star i had to give it. Its offensive because i have a stuffed lamb named lamby. The author knows some about cooking but not much

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Psilakis has made modern Greek cuisine easy

    There are many, many Greek and Mediterranean cookbooks on the market, many of which are more comprehensive than this. However, few have the heart that Psilakis displays in "How to Roast a Lamb." Aside from the title recipe actually appearing in the book (why yes, you can cook a whole lamb on a spit, and frankly I'd love to give it a whirl), Psilakis speaks heavily of his childhood and growing up as part of a Greek family. He spends quite a bit of time describing his father's garden, traditional Greek celebrations, and how his love for (and career of) cooking came to be. These short introductions and connective anecdotes provide a tremendous human side to the cooking, and are almost as great to read as the recipes. Almost.

    There are some very complex dishes in this book, many of which call for rarer ingredients (almost all of which Psilakis wisely suggests economic and simple substitutions for). Just the same, the vast majority of these recipes can be made by a cook with very basic skills. I look forward to some of the more complex dishes (again, that whole lamb...) as well as some of the simpler ones which I suspect will become old favorites for me rather quickly; read up on page 214/215 about making the spinach/cheese mix for spanikopita, but instead using simple elbow macaroni instead of phyllo for what is effectively an absolutely fantastic and amazing Greek macaroni and cheese.

    I think one of the most endearing parts of this cookbook are the photos, both of the food (beautifully prepared - you can almost smell the citrus, the olive oil, and the garlic by looking at them) and of Psilakis' childhood. These provide an excellent addition to his biographical stories and really make the reader smile - these were a very unexpected treat, because they help paint the picture that this book contains the very essence of Psilakis' being.

    You should always enjoy a cookbook in its entirety. You should not just buy a book and have six favorites and a sauce or two from it and let it languish on a shelf beyond those efforts. I should certainly hope that there will be more cookbooks like this (and hopefully from Psilakis, because, succinctly, this stuff is just delicious). The biographical elements add a richness to the food that is scarcely found so unimposingly in other cookbooks. So often do we see pretentious stories of "well when I was at such and such a place I created a simple omellete for the king of someplace because I'm superman," and stories in that vein. That's fine, but that's not really reality for most people. Growing up with strong ethnic roots is something many of us can relate to, and it made me smile. I look forward to cooking from this book and sharing its bounty with friends for decades to come.

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  • Posted December 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Review by www.beachbrights.blogspot.com

    I have never owned a greek cookbook and other than making my own chickpea hummus, I have never cooked Greek food. I did not grow up with Greek food. I have never been to a Greek restaurant. I believe this cookbook could change my cooking habits. I believe the recipes from this cookbook could find their way onto my table.

    This book should be viewed as a resource for Greek food and recipes. Every cook should have this book included in their arsenal. This is an excellent reference for original Greek recipes with a modern twist.

    I have to admit, I was intimidated by this book at first glance. It is a large book with overwhelming ingredient lists and hard to find items. Would a working mother really have time to shop and cook these recipes for her family? I will tell you honestly that some of these recipes are far too advanced for my family. The Poached Halibut with Cypriot Shellfish Salad, Cucumber-Yogurt Broth & Caviar has 49 ingredients including sheep's milk yogurt, live razor clams and sturgeon caviar. I don't think my local Kroger will be able to accommodate. I bring this up not in a negative way but to keep your expectations in check. This is not your casual Food Network recipe book. This book is about so much more than Greek food. It is about culture, family, traditions and the spirit of Greece.

    What I am planning for my table: Spanakopita, Dried Fruit Salad with Thyme-Honey Vinaigrette and Grilled Watermelon & Grilled Manouri.

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  • Posted November 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great for Greek Foodies of All Levels!

    How to Roast a Lamb by Michael Psilakis is an oversize and gorgeous Greek cookbook. It is also, in part, a memoir of Psilakis's early years.

    How to Roast a Lamb would be ideal for a Greek cuisine foodie or other proficient cook. For instance, foodies will likely enjoy the following recipes: Ouzo & Orange-Braised Snails; Roasted Skate with Walnut Baklava Yogurt & Candied Quince; and Octopus, Salami & Apples with Anchovy Vinaigrette and many more. The novice cook, however, may find these recipes challenging and/or aspirational. Still even the novice cook will find numerous delicious and accessible recipes, such as: Shrimp with Orzo & Tomato; Pan-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Potatoes; Spinach Rice; and Beef & Rice Meatballs in Egg-Lemon Soup. In addition, the memoir passages provide an interesting backstory to the recipes.

    How to Roast a Lamb would be a great gift for Greek Foodies of all levels!



    Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, Hachette Book Group, (Oct. 28, 2009), 304 pages
    Advance Review Copy Provided Courtesy of the Publisher.

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  • Posted November 6, 2009

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    Bridget's Review

    I love food but I hate cooking. Luckily, the love of my life also loves to cook. He's the king of spices and can cook pure perfection. He likes to take his time and make sure that the meal is as tasty as possible. There are tons of yummy recipes in this book that I am dying to try.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews

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