How to Set up and Maintain a World Wide Web Site: The Guide for Information Providers

How to Set up and Maintain a World Wide Web Site: The Guide for Information Providers

by Lincoln D. Stein
     
 
Creating a Web server site via the Internet can be a frustrating experience. This comprehensive guide covers all the essentials of designing, configuring, maintaining and expanding a Web site using the most popular software packages, CERN and NCSA. This World Wide Web guide will be an invaluable reference during all phases of a Web site's life span.

Overview

Creating a Web server site via the Internet can be a frustrating experience. This comprehensive guide covers all the essentials of designing, configuring, maintaining and expanding a Web site using the most popular software packages, CERN and NCSA. This World Wide Web guide will be an invaluable reference during all phases of a Web site's life span.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Introduces the World Wide Web and how it works; explains the use of HTTP; and discusses choosing, installing, and configuring Web server software, focusing on two of the most important popular servers, CERN and NCSA. Presents detailed information on using HTML and creating hypertext documents and server scripts and a chapter on Web site security. Includes a style guide illustrating organizational and design techniques for effective Web sites. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780201633894
Publisher:
Addison Wesley Professional
Publication date:
08/04/1995
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
496
Product dimensions:
7.47(w) x 9.22(h) x 1.41(d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

This is a guide for anyone who is planning to set up a World Wide Web server site, or who wants to enhance an existing one. It is intended to embrace a variety of needs: those of the corporate marketing department executive who needs to get the fall catalog on-line fast; the systems administrator nervous about system security; the scientist who wants to make a database of experimental results available to her colleagues; or the college student eager to share his insights on the city's best ice cream parlors.

Why purchase a book on WWW administration when all the information is already out there, freely available, in glorious hypermedia form? In part this book grew out of my frustration with the hypertext style of documentation. The information is indeed out there, but scattered about the globe, often incomplete, sometimes contradictory, ever changing, and frequently hard to locate again at a later date. This book pulls together all the relevant information garnered from one individual's struggle to set up and maintain a Web site.

Part of the beauty of the Web system is that a rudimentary site can be set up in an afternoon and allowed to grow and bear fruit for a long time thereafter. This guide is intended to be useful during all phases of a Web site's life span, from the first invocation of the C compiler to the last baroque frill on a gateway script that has grown so complex that not even its creator can figure out how it works. You probably won't need to read the whole book to accomplish what you want to do, but it is a comfort to know that it's all there when you need it. The book starts with the nitty gritty of choosingand obtaining Web server software, compiling it, installing it at the site, and configuring it to behave itself. Next there are chapters on how to get your information into Web-compatible form: how to write hypertext documents, what tools are available to convert existing text files into hypertext, and how to negotiate the alphabet soup of graphics, sound, and video standards. Security is a growing issue everywhere on the Internet, and this book devotes a chapter to that issue: both the problem of keeping the Web site secure and the task of dealing with network security measures that prevent Web software from working the way it's supposed to. Chapters on server scripts describe how to incorporate executable programs into the Web site, including such things as searchable indexes, fill-out forms, clickable maps, and gateways to other services. Finally, there is a Web style guide that tries to balance the topic of aesthetic purity with practical considerations such as performance. (A breathtakingly beautiful Web page is not much good if no one has the patience to wait for it to download.)

What this book is not is a manual for World Wide Web browsers or a listing of neat places to visit on the Web. Nor is it a guide to running all possible servers on all possible operating systems. It is unabashedly Unix oriented, and although the general principles of creating and maintaining a Web site will have relevance for Macintosh and MS-Windows sites, you'll need to supplement this book with other sources in order to get the necessary details. Within the Unix domain, however, I have tried to make the text as general as possible and have been careful to test all the examples on machines running BSD, OSF/1 and Linux dialects of Unix.

I hope that you enjoy opening up a Web site as much as I have, and I look forward to seeing you on the net.

About This Book

The code examples given in this book, including the contents of configuration files, executable scripts and the source code for HTML, are given in monospaced font. A bold monospaced font is used to indicate user input, as in:

zorro % date
Sunday, January 20, 1995, 10:05:03 EST
zorro %

A monospaced font is also used for URLs, and for the names of system commands.

URLs (the ubiquitous "Uniform Resource Locators" that uniquely identify each document on the Web) are used everywhere in this book. Unfortunately print is a static medium and URLs change constantly. Some of the URLs in this book will have changed between the time it went to press and the time it appeared on bookstore shelves. Hopefully the Webmasters responsible for these changed URLs left a forwarding address telling you where the new versions can be found. If not, I can only apologize and suggest that you try to track down the new location using one of the Web's many subject guides or keyword search services. The Web resource guide at www-genome.wi.mit.edu (see next section) may also contain updated addresses.

The book refers to a large number of Web resources, including icons, tools, executable scripts, code libraries, and sundry utilities. Typically, each resource has a home site where its most recent version can be found. For convenience, I've gathered up some of the most useful tools and placed them on a single site, accessible through the URL ...

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