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How to Teach Your Baby Math
     

How to Teach Your Baby Math

2.2 6
by Glenn Doman, Douglas Doman, Janet Doman
 

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Time and again, the work performed at The Institutes forthe Achievement of Human Potential has demonstrated that children from birth to age six are capable of learning better and faster than older children. How To Teach Your Baby To Read shows just how easy it is to teach a young child to read, while How To Teach Your Baby Math presents the simple

Overview

Time and again, the work performed at The Institutes forthe Achievement of Human Potential has demonstrated that children from birth to age six are capable of learning better and faster than older children. How To Teach Your Baby To Read shows just how easy it is to teach a young child to read, while How To Teach Your Baby Math presents the simple steps for teaching mathematics through the development of thinking and reasoning skills. Both books explain how to begin and expand each program, how to make and organize necessary materials, and how to more fully develop your child’s reading and math potential.

How to Give Your Baby Encyclopedic Knowledge shows how simple it is to develop a program that cultivates a young child’s awareness and understanding of the arts, science, and nature—to recognize the insects in the garden, to learn about the countries of the world, to discover the beauty of a Van Gogh painting, and much more. How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence provides a comprehensive program for teaching your young child how to read, to understand mathematics, and to literally multiply his or her overall learning potential in preparation for a lifetime of success.

The Gentle Revolution Series:

The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential has been successfully serving children and teaching parents for five decades. Its goal has been to significantly improve the intellectual, physical, and social development of all children. The groundbreaking methods and techniques of The Institutes have set the standards in early childhood education. As a result, the books written by Glenn Doman, founder of this organization, have become the all-time best-selling parenting series in the United States and the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780757001840
Publisher:
Square One Publishers
Publication date:
06/15/2005
Series:
The Gentle Revolution Series
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
626,669
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.75(d)

Meet the Author

Glenn Doman received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Pennsylvania in 1940. From that point on, he began pioneering the field of child brain development. In 1955, he founded The Institutes' world-renowned work with brain-injured children had led to vital discoveries regarding the growth and development of well children. The author has lived with, studied, and worked with children in more than one hundred nations, ranging from the most civilized to the most primitive. Doman is also the international best-selling author of six books, all part of the Gentle Revolution Series, including How To Teach Yor Baby To Read, How To Teach Your Baby Math, and How To Give Your Baby Encyclopedic Knowledge.

Douglas Doman is Vice President of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential and the son of

founder Glenn Doman. His early years working at The Institutes were spent establishing the School for Human Development for brain-injured young adults. He worked closely with Bruce Hagy to create the world’s first Human Development Course, a circuit of physical activities that promote neurological organization and development.

Janet Doman is the director of The Institutes and Glenn’s daughter. She was actively involved in helping brain-injured children by the time she was nine years old, and after completing her studies at the University of Pennsylvania, devoted herself to helping parents discover the vast potential of their babies and their own potential as teachers.

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How to Teach Your Baby Math 2.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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HarvardScholar More than 1 year ago
If you are trying to transform your kid into some precocious and burnt out counting monkey (with no guarantee to succeed, by the way) buy this book...no, actually, don't, it's a big waste of time and you may risk to harm your baby mind in the process. I was searching for a manual describing intelligent methods to stimulate my newborn kid creativity and abstract thinking, the basis for mathematical thinking, and I run into Dr. Doman's book. I am not a fan of this kind of books, but I learned about his commendable activity with brain injured kids (that is an area where Dr. Doman has more credibility and stands on solid grounds, it seems) and thought to give a try at his approach to early math education. It was a total disappointment. The style of writing is repetitions and boring, but I can live with that, the target reader has probably a wide range of education backgrounds. What he has to say could be easily condensed in one page, but worse, the method he proposes sounded totally bogus since the get-go and it probably is. He tries to teach kids from 6 mo to 2 years age numbers and calculations using dozens of flash cards with bright red dots shown to the baby at a fast rate as the stepping stone to more complex (?) tasks. In the end visual/auditory memorization and repetition seems to be the key factors in this approach. For a few kids this method seems to produce the expected result, but my question is: do we really want or need that result? fast counting monkeys no more intelligent than the next kid playing with wood blocks and crayons? From my independent assessment of his methods I understand that there is no research whatsoever supporting his claims, at best some anecdotical data exist from the activity in his expensive courses at the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential. It seems to me that the most likely outcome will be boring your infant to death, followed on the other hand by transforming her/him into a counting machine who will likely hate science, math, and probably you, for the rest of her adult life. Dr. Hirsh-Pasek book "Einstein Never Used Flashcards" support this conclusion (that book seems a better investment, at least she cites some technical literature), much research on young kids' education seems to indicate that capacity for abstraction matures around 5-6 years of age (it is no chance that that is the normal school age across the entire planet!) and that kids pushed into being home-made precocious geniuses may be less creative, curious and flexible later in life. who wants that? Before you consider buying this book, take time to read this article: http://www.boston.com/news/globe/magazine/articles/2007/10/28/rush_little_baby/ That alone would have saved me a few bucks. My current personal conclusion is that creative play, parental engagement, talking and reading (anything!) to your kids are better bets for growing creative and curious individuals ready to operate in the economy of tomorrow. bottom line, I consider this purchase my personal charity to Dr. Doman other's endeavors...no more than that.