How to Use Microsoft Windows XP

Overview

How to Use Microsoft Windows XP is designed to teach the new Windows XP user how to get the most out of a desktop computer. It also provides coverage for the experienced Windows user who wants to learn more about what's new in Windows XP.

The book includes extensive coverage of Windows XP's new features, including:

  • Windows XP's new user ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $2.20   
  • Used (13) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$2.20
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(11)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
PAPERBACK New 0672322560 TRACKING NUMBER INCLUDED New Unread Book May have some very minor shelf wear.

Ships from: Plantation, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$9.39
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(176)

Condition: New
0672322560 BRAND NEW NEVER USED IN STOCK 125,000+ HAPPY CUSTOMERS SHIP EVERY DAY WITH FREE TRACKING NUMBER

Ships from: fallbrook, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$31.70
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(361)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$59.91
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(213)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

How to Use Microsoft Windows XP is designed to teach the new Windows XP user how to get the most out of a desktop computer. It also provides coverage for the experienced Windows user who wants to learn more about what's new in Windows XP.

The book includes extensive coverage of Windows XP's new features, including:

  • Windows XP's new user interface and enhanced reliability and manageability
  • Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer 6
  • Setting up Windows XP's enhanced wireless and home networking features
  • Playing MP3s and streaming media files with Windows Media Player 8
  • Editing digital video with Windows Movie Maker 1.1
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Designed for complete beginners to Windows, Glenn's text is clearly written and organized, with lots of illustrations and diagrams. Home or small business users will be the book's main audience. The text covers how to manage your desktop, synchronize offline items, share an Internet connection, send attached files in email, and change or remove programs, among other topics. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672322563
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 10/28/2001
  • Series: How to Use Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 289
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 10.08 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

Walter Glenn is an independent writer, editor, and networking consultant. He is a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, Internet Specialist, and Certified Trainer. He has been part of the computer industry for about 17 years, working his way from PC repair, to programming, to networking and has written extensively about networking and the Windows operating environment. He lives and works in Huntsville, Alabama.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from

Part 7: Working Away from the Network

Many people work when they're away from their network or computer. Some connect over a modem, some take work to another computer on disk, and some actually take their computers on the road with them. Windows XP offers two distinct ways to work when you are away from your usual setup. The first way is with a utility named the Windows Briefcase. The second way is to use offline folders.

The briefcase is a special folder designed primarily for users who want to take work to another computer using a floppy, Zip, or other type of removable disk. All you have to do is copy files from your main computer into the briefcase, move the briefcase to a disk, and carry the disk with you. Offline folders are available only in Windows XP Professional, not in the Home Edition. You can work on and save the files right in the briefcase. When you return, carry the disk back, move the briefcase back onto your main computer, and synchronize the updated files in the briefcase with the originals on your hard disk. When you synchronize a briefcase, any files with a later modification date replace those of the same names with an earlier modification date. This means that the files you changed while you were away replace those on your main computer.

Offline folders are designed for those who actually take their computers away from a network, as do users of notebook computers or those who dial into the network periodically with a modem. Offline folders are available only in Windows XP Professional, not in the Home Edition. You can mark any shared folder available on the network to be available offline. The contents of these folders are copied to the hard drive on your computer. When you are disconnected from the network, you can work on any of the files in the shared folders. When you reconnect to the network, the files are synchronized with the originals. Some people also use offline folders while they are still connected to the network. This allows them to work on copies of the original files instead of on the originals themselves.

How to Create and Fill a Briefcase

Creating a briefcase in Windows is pretty easy. After it is created, you can move files into and out of it the same way you move other folders on your computer. You can create a briefcase directly on the desktop or in any folder using the method described in this task.

1: Create the New Briefcase

Right-click any empty space on your desktop, point 1 New on the shortcut menu, and then choose Briefcase A new icon with the label New Briefcase appears on the desktop.

2: Open the New Briefcase

Double-click the New Briefcase icon to open it. The first time you open any new briefcase, you are shown a welcome screen that gives you a brief introduction to using it.

3: Open My Documents

To place objects in the briefcase, you must first locat those objects. Double-click the My Documents icon the desktop to open the My Documents window...

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Using the Windows XP Desktop 4
How to Log On to Windows XP 6
How to Use Your Mouse 8
How to Display Icons on Your Desktop 10
How to Start a Program 12
How to Arrange Windows on the Desktop 14
How to Switch Between Programs 16
How to Use the System Tray 18
How to Browse Your Disk Drives 20
How to Get Help 22
How to Use the Recycle Bin 24
How to Log Off Windows XP 26
How to Shut Down Your Computer 28
2 Working with Files and Folders 30
How to Use Windows Explorer 32
How to Search for a File or Folder 34
How to Create a Folder 36
How to View Items in a Folder 38
How to Create a File 40
How to Open a File 42
How to Save a File 44
How to Create a Shortcut to a File or Folder 46
How to Rename a File or Folder 48
How to Delete a File or Folder 50
How to Move or Copy a File or Folder 52
How to Format a Floppy Disk 53
How to Format a Floppy Disk 54
How to Send a File to the Floppy Drive 56
How to Open a File with a Certain Program 58
3 Printing 60
How to Print a Document from a Program 62
How to Print a Document from Windows 64
How to Manage Documents Waiting to Print 66
How to Change Printer Settings 68
How to Share a Printer with Others 70
How to Install a Local Printer 72
How to Set Up Your Computer to Use a Network Printer 76
4 Working on the Internet 78
How to Start Internet Explorer 80
How to Get to a Web Site 82
How to Search for a Web Site 84
How to Use the Favorites Menu 86
How to Use the History List 88
How to Make Web Pages Available Offline 90
How to Change Settings for Internet Explorer 92
How to Use MSN Explorer 94
How to Use Windows Messenger 98
How to Publish a File to the Web 100
5 Using Internet E-Mail and Newsgroups 102
How to Send E-Mail with Outlook Express 104
How to Receive E-Mail 106
How to Use the Address Book 108
How to Change Settings for Outlook Express 110
How to Receive an Attached File 112
How to Send an Attached File 114
How to Subscribe to a Newsgroup 116
How to Read a Newsgroup Posting 118
How to Post to a Newsgroup 120
6 Working on a Network 122
How to Set Up a Small Network 124
How to Set Up Additional User Accounts 128
How to Share an Internet Connection 130
How to Use My Network Places 132
How to Add a Network Place 134
How to Find a Computer on the Network 136
How to Find a File on the Network 138
How to Share a File or Folder with Others 140
How to Map a Network Drive 142
7 Working Away from the Network 144
How to Create and Fill a Briefcase 146
How to Take a Briefcase with You 148
How to Update Files in a Briefcase 150
How to Make Items Available Offline 152
How to Use Offline Items 154
How to Synchronize Offline Items 156
How to Change Offline Settings 158
8 Having Fun with Windows XP 160
How to Play Music and Movies 162
How to Record Music 164
How to Find Music Online 166
How to Make Movies 168
How to Work with Pictures 172
How to Play Games 174
9 Protecting Your Files 176
How to Set Local Permissions on a Domain-Based Network 178
How to Set Shared Permissions on a Domain-Based Network 180
How to Encrypt a File or Folder 182
How to Lock Your Workstation 184
How to Assign a Screen Saver Password 186
How to Change Your Logon Password 188
10 Changing Windows XP Settings 190
How to Change the Volume 192
How to Set Up a Screen Saver 194
How to Change Your Desktop Theme 196
How to Change Your Wallpaper 198
How to Change Desktop Appearance 200
How to Change Display Settings 202
How to Change Mouse Settings 204
How to Change Keyboard Settings 206
How to Customize the Taskbar 208
How to Change Folder Options 210
How to Change Power Options 212
How to Change System Sounds 214
How to Add an Item to the Start Menu 216
How to Add an Item to the Quick Launch Bar 218
How to Start a Program When Windows Starts 220
How to Set Accessibility Options 222
11 Using the System Tools 224
How to Back Up Your Files 226
How to Restore Files from a Backup 228
How to Use Automated System Recovery 230
How to Free Up Space on Your Hard Disk 232
How to Defragment Your Hard Disk 234
How to Schedule a Task to Occur Automatically 236
How to Use the Windows Troubleshooters 238
How to Get System Information 240
How to Use System Restore 242
How to Compress Files and Folders 244
12 Installing New Software and Hardware 246
How to Add a Program to Your Computer 248
How to Change or Remove a Program 250
How to Add Windows Components from the CD 252
How to Add Windows Components from the Internet 254
How to Find Out About Your Installed Hardware 256
Appendix Installing Windows XP 258
How to Upgrade to Windows XP 260
How to Install Windows XP on a Blank Hard Drive 262
How to Activate Windows XP 266
How to Create Setup Floppy Disks 268
Glossary 270
Index 278
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

Let's face it. Most of you have better things to do than become a computer expert; a complex operating system such as Windows XP can be pretty intimidating when your boss or administrator plops it on your desk and says, "This is what you'll be using from now on." Fortunately, Windows XP is designed to be easy to use, and this book is designed to make it even easier. Whether you are completely new to Windows, or feel at home clicking your way through all those dialog boxes, you are likely to have questions:
  • How do you search for a file when you don't know its name?
  • How do you install a network printer?
  • How do you manage documents that are waiting to print?
  • How do you work with files on the network?
  • How do you make a movie?
  • How do you set permissions on a file?
  • How do you change the way your mouse works?
How to Use Windows XP provides easy-to-follow, stepby-step, and visual instructions for performing all of these common (and some not-so-common) tasks. This book uses actual pictures of the Windows XP screens to show you what you'll see at each step of a task. With each picture, a written explanation shows you the details of performing the task in simple, jargon-free language. Using the pictures with the text is a great way to learn and accomplish the tasks the first time. Later, you can refresh your memory simply by scanning the pictures.

Windows XP comes in two different editions: Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional (actually, there is a third edition-Windows XP 64-bit Editionwhich will debut later and is for high-end technical workstations). You can find out which edition you have by looking at your Windows XP CD-ROM. If you have already installed Windows XP, you can find out which edition you have by watching the screen when Windows is starting. You can also find out by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del simultaneously while Windows is running; the window that opens tells you which edition you have. For the most part, Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional are identical. They look and feel the same and come with all the same functionality and programs. Windows XP Professional does include a few extra features that Windows XP Home Edition does not; these features are intended to make Windows XP Professional more suited to a corporate environment:

  • Windows XP Professional supports computers with multiple processors (CPUs) for higher performance. Windows XP Home Edition supports only one processor.
  • Windows XP Professional supports extra security measures, such as the ability to assign detailed permissions to files and folders. These permissions, which specify the rights other people on a network have to use your files, are covered in Part 9 of this book, "Protecting Your Files."
  • Windows XP Professional is designed to work more efficiently on a domain-based network that uses powerful server computers running Windows 2000 or 2002 Server.
If you use Windows XP at home or in a small business (and maybe on a small network), these extra features provided by Windows XP Professional will have little added value.

This book is primarily intended for the home or small business user, although the tasks are equally wellsuited for the professional user. For the most part, all the tasks in this book can be applied to both editions of Windows XP. The few instances where this is not . true, or where subtitle differences might trip you up, are prominently printed out.

Each task described in this book is a specific action you will use in Windows XP, such as changing the volume on your computer or backing up files. Most tasks are described in no more than seven steps. Many tasks also include special "How-To Hints" that provide information related to the task. Finally, tasks are arranged in the following groups, making it easy to learn related sets of skills without hunting through the book:

  • Using the Windows XP Desktop
  • Working with Files and Folders
  • Printing
  • Working on the Internet
  • Using Internet E-Mail and Newsgroups
  • Working on a Network
  • Working Away from the Network
  • Having Fun with Windows XP
  • Protecting Your Files
  • Changing Windows XP Settings
  • Using the System Tools
  • Installing New Software and Hardware
  • Installing Windows XP
Whatever your level of expertise and for whatever reason you use Windows XP, you will find this book a useful tool. Whether you read it cover to cover, or set it aside for reference when you come across a specific task with which you need help, this book provides you with the information you need to complete the task and get on with your work. Enjoy!
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)