How to Use Microsoft Windows XP

How to Use Microsoft Windows XP

by Walter J. Glenn, Walter Glenn
     
 
How to Use Microsoft Windows XP is designed to teach the new Windows XP user how to get the most out of a desktop computer. It also provides coverage for the experienced Windows user who wants to learn more about what's new in Windows XP.

The book includes extensive coverage of Windows XP's new features, including:

  • Windows XP's new

Overview

How to Use Microsoft Windows XP is designed to teach the new Windows XP user how to get the most out of a desktop computer. It also provides coverage for the experienced Windows user who wants to learn more about what's new in Windows XP.

The book includes extensive coverage of Windows XP's new features, including:

  • Windows XP's new user interface and enhanced reliability and manageability
  • Browsing the Web with Internet Explorer 6
  • Setting up Windows XP's enhanced wireless and home networking features
  • Playing MP3s and streaming media files with Windows Media Player 8
  • Editing digital video with Windows Movie Maker 1.1

Editorial Reviews

Designed for complete beginners to Windows, Glenn's text is clearly written and organized, with lots of illustrations and diagrams. Home or small business users will be the book's main audience. The text covers how to manage your desktop, synchronize offline items, share an Internet connection, send attached files in email, and change or remove programs, among other topics. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672322563
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Series:
How to Use Series
Pages:
289
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 10.08(h) x 0.58(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from

Part 7: Working Away from the Network

Many people work when they're away from their network or computer. Some connect over a modem, some take work to another computer on disk, and some actually take their computers on the road with them. Windows XP offers two distinct ways to work when you are away from your usual setup. The first way is with a utility named the Windows Briefcase. The second way is to use offline folders.

The briefcase is a special folder designed primarily for users who want to take work to another computer using a floppy, Zip, or other type of removable disk. All you have to do is copy files from your main computer into the briefcase, move the briefcase to a disk, and carry the disk with you. Offline folders are available only in Windows XP Professional, not in the Home Edition. You can work on and save the files right in the briefcase. When you return, carry the disk back, move the briefcase back onto your main computer, and synchronize the updated files in the briefcase with the originals on your hard disk. When you synchronize a briefcase, any files with a later modification date replace those of the same names with an earlier modification date. This means that the files you changed while you were away replace those on your main computer.

Offline folders are designed for those who actually take their computers away from a network, as do users of notebook computers or those who dial into the network periodically with a modem. Offline folders are available only in Windows XP Professional, not in the Home Edition. You can mark any shared folder available on the network to be available offline. The contents of these folders are copied to the hard drive on your computer. When you are disconnected from the network, you can work on any of the files in the shared folders. When you reconnect to the network, the files are synchronized with the originals. Some people also use offline folders while they are still connected to the network. This allows them to work on copies of the original files instead of on the originals themselves.

How to Create and Fill a Briefcase

Creating a briefcase in Windows is pretty easy. After it is created, you can move files into and out of it the same way you move other folders on your computer. You can create a briefcase directly on the desktop or in any folder using the method described in this task.

1: Create the New Briefcase

Right-click any empty space on your desktop, point 1 New on the shortcut menu, and then choose Briefcase A new icon with the label New Briefcase appears on the desktop.

2: Open the New Briefcase

Double-click the New Briefcase icon to open it. The first time you open any new briefcase, you are shown a welcome screen that gives you a brief introduction to using it.

3: Open My Documents

To place objects in the briefcase, you must first locat those objects. Double-click the My Documents icon the desktop to open the My Documents window...

Meet the Author

Walter Glenn is an independent writer, editor, and networking consultant. He is a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, Internet Specialist, and Certified Trainer. He has been part of the computer industry for about 17 years, working his way from PC repair, to programming, to networking and has written extensively about networking and the Windows operating environment. He lives and works in Huntsville, Alabama.

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