How to Use the Internet, 2002 Edition

How to Use the Internet, 2002 Edition

by Rogers Cadenhead
     
 

How to Use The Internet visually steps the reader through everything he or she needs to know in order to get connected to the Internet, browse and create Web pages, send and receive e-mail, read and post to newsgroups, and apply the Internet to their everyday office and home life.

  • Almost 100 two-page spreads illustrate and clearly explain each

See more details below

Overview

How to Use The Internet visually steps the reader through everything he or she needs to know in order to get connected to the Internet, browse and create Web pages, send and receive e-mail, read and post to newsgroups, and apply the Internet to their everyday office and home life.

  • Almost 100 two-page spreads illustrate and clearly explain each Internet task, from entry-level, beginning concepts to sophisticated techniques for more advanced users.
  • Illustrations and figures lead the reader through each task with easy-to-follow directions and visual cues.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672322150
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
08/31/2001
Series:
How to Use Series
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
8.07(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.47(d)

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Part

7: Participating in Usenet Discussion Groups

One of the most popular communities on the Internet is Usenet, a collection of public discussion groups on a diverse range of topics. Usenet groups, which also are called newsgroups, are distributed by thousands of Internet sites around the world. Newsgroups function in a manner similar to electronic mailing lists (which were described in Part 5, Task 8, "How to Subscribe to a Mailing List"). Subscribers join a group they are interested in, read the messages written by other subscribers, and contribute their own messages. But there's a big difference between mailing lists and newsgroups: Mailing lists are distributed by a single computer; thousands of computers distribute each Usenet newsgroup message. When you post a message in a Usenet newsgroup, it is stored on the server you use. The message is then copied by all other servers connected to Usenet that carry the newsgroup. The decentralized design of Usenet gives it a unique personality. Messages can't be removed from all those servers after they are sent. Although a small number of Usenet newsgroups have a moderator who must approve messages before they are distributed, most newsgroups are unrestricted. Unlike a Web site or a mailing list, no one can stop a discussion by taking control of the right computer. Usenet also is set up so that new discussion groups can be created quickly on any topic.

This freedom leads to many discussions that might never take place anywhere else but on Usenet. It also does little to discourage things that shouldn't be taking place at all.

Task 1: How to Set Up Outlook Express for Usenet Newgroups

Outlook press sup Outlook Express supports Usenet newgroups in addition to e-mail. To participate in Usenet, youmust have access to a news server in ad to e-mail. To participate in Usenet, you must have access to a news server- an Internet site that can send and recieve newsgroup messages.. Many Internet service providers offer Usenet as part of a subscription-if yours does, the provider should give you the name of its news server. You also can subscribe to Usenet with services such as Supernews and NewsGuy. Before you can set up Outlook Express to work with Usenet, you must have the name of your news server. If your server requires a username and password, you also must have this information to get started.

1: Run Outlook Express

Launch Outlook Express: Click the Start button and choose E-mail.

2: Set Up Newsgroups

If Outlook Express has not already been set up to work with Usenet, a Set up a Newsgroups account hyperlink will be displayed. Click this hyperlink to start the Internet Connection Wizard.

3: Identify Yourself

A name will be displayed on all the messages you post in Usenet newsgroups. In the Display name text box, type the name, or handle, that will identify you. Unlike e-mail, where real names are the norm, on Usenet it is commonplace for people to use a nickname or similar pseudonym when posting messages. Click Next to continue...

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