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How to Wash a Woolly Mammoth
     

How to Wash a Woolly Mammoth

by Michelle Robinson, Kate Hindley (Illustrator)
 

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Things can get a bit messy when you try to wash a woolly mammoth. Follow this step-by-step guide to successfully clean up your hairy friend. Be forewarned! A mammoth's tummy is terribly tickly.

Young readers and parents alike will appreciate this hilarious bath time adventure.

Overview

Things can get a bit messy when you try to wash a woolly mammoth. Follow this step-by-step guide to successfully clean up your hairy friend. Be forewarned! A mammoth's tummy is terribly tickly.

Young readers and parents alike will appreciate this hilarious bath time adventure.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/28/2013
Unconventional pets abound in children’s books, from the mechanical (How to Train a Train) to the extinct (Buying, Training, and Caring for Your Dinosaur). The British duo of Robinson (What to Do If an Elephant Stands On Your Foot) and Hindley (The Great Snortle Hunt) focus on one aspect of mammoth ownership: bath time. Outfitted in a yellow hoodie and red boots, Robinson’s heroine tackles the job with persistence as Robinson provides a step-by-step tutorial. After filling the bath comes “Step two: Add bubble bath” and “Step three: Add mammoth.” It’s easier said than done, and in a sequence of labeled figures, Hindley shows the girl making four attempts that involve a broom, “spooky mask,” skateboard, and “heavy-duty crane.” The author and artist feel entirely in step, especially during the closing sequence that has the mammoth getting—horror of horrors—shampoo in its eyes and dashing up a tree, requiring a muddy rescue via trampoline. It’s a madcap story of pet care with sweetness at its core. Ages 4–8. Author’s agent: the Catchpole Agency. Illustrator’s agent: Jodie Marsh, United Agents. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

“Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations show an eye for detail; a plethora of humorous bath products preceding the title page include "tusk whitener," "antibacterial hoof wash," and a generous tube of "elbow grease." The procedural text keeps the pages turning and contrasts nicely with the winsome illustrations. Youngsters will enjoy this lighthearted tale, especially the very last step: 'Throw in the towel and SNUGGLE!'” —School Library Journal

“It's an adorable bath time adventure, starring an expressive hairy giant and a sweet sprite of a child, who smartly wears a raincoat throughout. Share as a laugh-out-loud warm-up to any kid's own scrub-a-dub routine.” —Booklist

“It's a madcap story of pet care with sweetness at its core.” —Publishers Weekly

“Robinson, in what is her first book for children, strikes just the right 'in on the joke' tone.” —The New York Times on 'What To Do If An Elephant Stands On Your Foot'

“When the ending suggests that the story is starting over, listeners will be happy to hear it again.?” —Kirkus Reviews on 'What To Do If An Elephant Stands On Your Foot'

Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
In the manner of all good “how to” guides, this instructive text is replete with diagrams and useful guidance. Follow along step by step from the first (“Fill the bathtub”) through the seventh, washing the mammoth’s hair. But when shampoo gets in the mammoth’s eyes—didn’t you see the “Be CAREFUL” notice, reader?—the animal ends up in a tree and things become a bit unpredictable. Or maybe they have been unpredictable all along? Surely, they have been silly. All’s well that ends well with step ten: “Throw in the towel and SNUGGLE!” Readers who enjoy the outlandish will love this book. If you have a woolly mammoth, you can be confident this is good advice. If you do not have one, you can enjoy the laughs this will bring. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green; Ages 4 to 8.
School Library Journal
01/01/2014
K-Gr 2—Washing a woolly mammoth is possible, but one must carefully follow each step. Children are introduced to a gigantic, unwashed wooly mammoth and the intrepid young girl who demonstrates the proper method for bathing such a beast. Surrounded by bits of leaves and circling flies, the "notoriously tricky to clean" animal stares despondently out at readers. The girl quickly takes charge, recommending the proper level of water for the tub and methods to entice the mammoth into the bath (by brute force, scare tactics, or tempting baked goods). All ends with an invitation to a bubbly, toy-filled soak for her muddy, wooly friend. Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations show an eye for detail; a plethora of humorous bath products preceding the title page include "tusk whitener," "antibacterial hoof wash," and a generous tube of "elbow grease." The procedural text keeps the pages turning and contrasts nicely with the winsome illustrations. Youngsters will enjoy this lighthearted tale, especially the very last step: "Throw in the towel and SNUGGLE!"—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX
Kirkus Reviews
2013-11-13
Step-by-step advice for tackling the task of mammoth hygiene. Moving to a very different pachyderm from the one in her previous title, What to Do If an Elephant Stands on Your Foot, illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds (2012), Robinson instructs readers in the best ways to give your average everyday mammoth a bath. Taking cues from instructional guides, Hindley depicts diagrams of properly filled baths, figures that show how to get one's mammoth into the bathtub and even an array of possible soapy hairstyles. A misstep involving soap and large eyes leads to a very dirty mammoth escapee. So dirty, in fact, that the raincoat-clad heroine ends up taking a bath with him, much to the mutual contentment of the two. The art lifts what might otherwise have been an average outing with a delightfully expressive mammoth (he may not speak a word, but his eyebrows alone convey volumes). Lined ledger paper stands in perfectly for bathroom tiles, and even the rubber ducky is an interesting character to follow. With its combination of understated text and witty art, this book will leave most readers hankering (read: begging, pleading) for a prehistoric pet of their very own. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805099669
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
01/21/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
138,875
Product dimensions:
10.50(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Michelle Robinson is a picture book author and a native of Gloucestershire, UK where she spent her childhood roaming the countryside, observing ladybugs and ruminating on the finer qualities of cows. Her previous works include Goodnight Tractor, Ding Dong Gorilla!, and What to Do If an Elephant Stands on Your Foot. She lives in Frome, UK with her family.

Kate Hindley is a children's book illustrator, currently living and working in Worcestershire, UK. Her first picture book illustrations appeared in The Great Snortle Hunt. She likes doodling, and pea and ham soup.

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