How to Work With an Architect

How to Work With an Architect

by Gerald Morosco
     
 

Anyone who has endeavored to remodel or build a home from the ground up knows that the process can be trying at best, infuriating at worst. That process can be made infinitely more enjoyable when you have the benefit of a professional architect's expertise at the ready. In How to Work with an Architect, noted architect and Taliesin Fellow Gerald Lee Morosco, AIA,… See more details below

Overview

Anyone who has endeavored to remodel or build a home from the ground up knows that the process can be trying at best, infuriating at worst. That process can be made infinitely more enjoyable when you have the benefit of a professional architect's expertise at the ready. In How to Work with an Architect, noted architect and Taliesin Fellow Gerald Lee Morosco, AIA, reveals the essential criteria for a successful architect/client relationship, explaining not only what the benefits of working with an architect are, but also showing how an architect adds immeasurable value to a project.

Focusing mainly on single-family residential design, Morosco presents a thorough discussion of the collaboration process, beginning with what an architect is and how an architect can help you. How to Work with an Architect helps you answer important questions before you hire an architect or start a project, including:

What is an Architect?

Do I Really Need an Architect?

How Do I Find an Architect?

How Do I Negotiate a Contract?

Where do I Build or Buy?

What Zoning and Building Codes Do I Need to Be Aware of?

How Do I Find a Builder?

How to Work with an Architect also offers a brief history of the profession, with features on prominent architects and their philosophies. In addition, there are sidebars featuring the American Institute of Architects, NCARB, state licensing boards, a directory of Taliesin fellows, a step-by-step planning checklist, and much more. With color photos and plan drawings, this book is an invaluable resource for anyone embarking on the process of building a new home.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Lamenting that the book he would give his clients-John Milnes Baker's How To Build a House with an Architect-is out of print, Morosco, founder of a preservation-based architectural firm in Pittsburgh, has written a guide to explain the value of working with an architect. First he discusses what an architect can do for a client, matters of education and licensing, the difference between an architect and other design professionals, and the advantages of working with an architect. He then delineates how a client and an architect should work together, explaining what to expect from the relationship and the architect's duties each step of the way. The text is illustrated mostly with color photos and design plans of Morosco's work. This guide for both amateurs and professionals is recommended for collections large and small. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423600077
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
04/24/2006
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
9.64(w) x 9.58(h) x 0.52(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

How Do I Find an Architect?

At the conclusion of my presentations on how to work with an architect at various forums across the county, the most repeated question I receive from clients is, How do I find an architect?

Based on the answers from others in the audiences and by way of experience in my own practice, the most common, and the best initial methodology to seek out an architect is to ask for recommendations from friends, coworkers, and acquaintances who have had previous experience in working with an architect. As with many things in life, word of mouth remains one of the most reliable means of introduction. Keep in mind, however, that one client's Prince Charming may well turn out to be another's toad, and no amount of kissing will achieve the transformation if the essential chemistry between the parties is not right.

There are a great number of architects and architectural firms from which you can evaluate potential partners for the conception and delivery of a residential project. Nevertheless, with a little investigation, you will quickly discern that many, many architects and architectural firms simply do not engage in residential practice at all! Of those that may consider such work, fewer still will entertain projects for alterations or additions to existing dwellings. Others may be quite specific (i.e., particular) regarding the "style" of architecture in which they are comfortable, or capable of, working within. Preliminary questions are best posed in an initial conversation over the telephone with the prospective architectural firm.

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