How Tv Changed America's Mind

Overview

A prize-winning journalist and widely published professor of communications examines how TV coverage shaped the way Americans viewed pivotal events over a 50-year span. Mixing the drama of what happened with insights into why TV has such great impact, the author looks beyond the images and analyzes the power of the medium. Leading media professionals praised the book for going beyond the customary nutshell history of television, for masterfully showing the influence of TV, and for making crucial events come alive...
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Overview

A prize-winning journalist and widely published professor of communications examines how TV coverage shaped the way Americans viewed pivotal events over a 50-year span. Mixing the drama of what happened with insights into why TV has such great impact, the author looks beyond the images and analyzes the power of the medium. Leading media professionals praised the book for going beyond the customary nutshell history of television, for masterfully showing the influence of TV, and for making crucial events come alive with new excitement and relevance.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Sue Preissner
School Library Journal (7/96) noted "The strength of this work is in its age-appropriate explanation and analysis of how news coverage has molded and been shaped by notable trends and current events." I couldn't agree more. By using both historical events and media journalism sources, this book chronicles post-World War II U.S.A. From the 50's McCarthyism, to Vietnam, lunar exploration, Watergate, Iran, Rodney King, and the O.J. Simpson trial, a variety of topics are reported with accompanying photographs (some of dubious quality). Each decade defines a part of this book, but the text and contents are not consistent in their treatment. The book does not demonstrate cultural diversity nor does it delve into TV's impact on advertising, presentation of the news or the popularity of various entertainment shows.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 UpWakin chronicles the impact of television's broadcast news on the last 50 years of U.S. history. Incorporating authoritative sources on both media journalism and major national events, this fact-filled account will be most useful to young people who have some knowledge of post-World War II America. The book looks at each decade's confrontations, politics, wars, heroes and villains, and eye-openers. From McCarthyism to the Kennedy assassination to Watergate to the O.J. Simpson trial, it explores the interplay between how these occurrences were portrayed on the screen and how they influenced public opinion. Black-and-white photographs of leading figures and happenings accompany the chronological text. Photographic collages of "average Americans" (all Caucasian) with heads inside TV sets are meant to represent the different time periods stylistically. Instead, their inclusion trivializes the reality that individuals have control over how they view and think about the images and stories presented on television. Other black-and-white photos of varying quality appear throughout. While the title indicates a broad coverage, the cultural effects of TV on advertising, regular shows, and entertainment are not discussed. The strength of this work is in its age-appropriate explanation and analysis of how news coverage has molded and been shaped by notable trends and current events.Janet Woodward, Franklin High School, Seattle, WA
Kirkus Reviews
A decade-by-decade consideration of the major news events since the 1950s and how they were covered on and influenced by television. The events of each decade are divided into five categories—"Confrontation," "Politics," "War," "Heroes and Villains," and "Eye-Openers." Many incidents are well known to children (the first moon walk, the assassination of JFK), but others will be less familiar. Wakin discusses the events and then critically evaluates television's impact on them, making readers think about this pervasive medium in a new way. The author neither glorifies nor demonizes TV, although he does focus on serious news programming and ignores the tabloids and cheesier talk shows. A thoughtful book and compelling reading.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595252640
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/25/2002
  • Edition number: 0
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 0.57 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)

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