How We Know What We Know about Our Changing Climate: Scientists and Kids Explore Global Warming

How We Know What We Know about Our Changing Climate: Scientists and Kids Explore Global Warming

by Lynne Cherry, Gary Braasch
     
 

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This highly-acclaimed climate change education title, winner of twelve book awards, is now available in paperback! When the weather changes daily, how do we really know that Earth's climate is changing? Here is the science behind the headlines - evidence from flowers, butterflies, birds, frogs, trees, glaciers and much more, gathered by scientists from all over the

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Overview

This highly-acclaimed climate change education title, winner of twelve book awards, is now available in paperback! When the weather changes daily, how do we really know that Earth's climate is changing? Here is the science behind the headlines - evidence from flowers, butterflies, birds, frogs, trees, glaciers and much more, gathered by scientists from all over the world, sometimes with assistance from young ""citizen-scientists."" And here is what young people, and their families and teachers, can do to learn about climate change and take action. Climate change is a critical and timely topic of deep concern, here told in an age-appropriate manner, with clarity and hope. Kids can make a difference!

This book combines the talents of two uniquely qualified authors: Lynne Cherry, the leading children's environmental writer/illustrator and author of The Great Kapok Tree, and Gary Braasch, award-winning photojournalist and author of Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming is Changing the World.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Donna L. Phillips
Given youth preference for online sources, buying an ecology book can be a difficult decision; nevertheless this resource merits the cost and shelf space. Its historical perspective and reputations of its author and illustrator will extend its shelf life. It distills and repurposes photojournalist Braasch's Earth Under Fire (University of California Press, 2007), including some of its remarkable before-and-after photographs of places devastated by global warming. In this version for younger readers, he teams with a wellknown author and illustrator of children's books to produce a reader- and classroomfriendly book. Organized in four sections, the book first lays out the evidence for global warming in two-page verbal and visual snapshots of a single topic—whether birds, butterflies, tree rings, or ice cores. Subsequent sections synthesize the evidence, describe things students can do to become involved, and provide well-organized lists of additional resources that seem likely to have a respectable shelf life as well. Although Cherry's writing is not as engaging as in other works, she capably introduces and explains scientific vocabulary within the text. The two-page format is well suited for browsing or a quick introduction to its various topics. Adolescents might not appreciate the "kids" in the subtitle, but the illustrations will appeal a variety of age levels. A fifty-six-page Teacher's Guide with hands-on activities and additional resources is also available. Reviewer: Donna L. Phillips
Children's Literature - Mary Bowman-Kruhm
This book ably lives up to its series name: "A Sharing Nature with Children Book." It begins with a clear and concise definition of scientific inquiry that does not negate religion, and it ends with environmental success stories. The layout, photographs, and writing combine to invite a young person to learn more about global warming. The book is divided into four sections: "Where We Find Clues About Climate Change," "Fitting the Clues Together," "What Scientists and You Can Do," and "Resources." Each section is comprised of two page spreads on different topics (e.g., "Cool Clues on the Tundra," "Tree Rings Tell Stories of the Past"). The numerous color photographs are well chosen and brilliantly project on the glossy paper. Text includes projects carried out by children. For example, students in Nova Scotia recorded observations of birds from 1900 to 1923 and data from these 1,400 schools is still useful today in analyzing Canada's changing climate. This highly recommended book will provide background information for young readers about an important topic and it will surely encourage them, their parents, and teachers to consider creative projects that may be relevant a hundred years from now. Reviewer: Mary Bowman-Kruhm, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

Gr 4-8- Cherry and Braasch introduce readers to scientists around the world whose research contributes to an understanding of the causes and consequences of global warming. They also describe the work of citizen scientists, including children, whose observations contribute to knowledge about important changes that are occurring. Studies range from documenting bloom dates of trees and flowers to extracting mud cores from the ocean floor. Small color photographs show the fieldwork and experiments of scientists and students. Even though many findings indicate a grim outlook for plant and animal life, including humans, if the current trends continue, the authors consistently note ways in which students can have a positive impact by making personal choices and influencing public policy. A concluding spread identifies the more than 40 scientists mentioned in the text. The book's wide-ranging exploration of scientific studies and the encouragement to people of every age to become citizen scientists and active participants for change make this a valuable purchase.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584691037
Publisher:
Dawn Publications
Publication date:
03/01/2008
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
600,586
Product dimensions:
9.06(w) x 11.12(h) x 0.39(d)
Lexile:
1170L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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