How We Think [NOOK Book]

Overview

The dean of American philosophers shares his views on methods of training students to think well. His considerations include inductive and deductive logic, interpreting facts, concrete and abstract thinking, the roles of activity, language, and observation, and many other aspects of thought training. This volume is essential reading for teachers and other education professionals.
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How We Think

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Overview

The dean of American philosophers shares his views on methods of training students to think well. His considerations include inductive and deductive logic, interpreting facts, concrete and abstract thinking, the roles of activity, language, and observation, and many other aspects of thought training. This volume is essential reading for teachers and other education professionals.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Dewey's 1910 essay on teaching reasoning. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940026538249
  • Publisher: D.C. Heath & Co.
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1910 volume
  • File size: 379 KB

Meet the Author

John Dewey (1859-1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey, along with Charles Sanders Peirce and William James, is recognized as one of the founders of the philosophy of pragmatism and of functional psychology. He was a major representative of the progressive and progressive populist[2] philosophies of schooling during the first half of the 20th century in the USA.[3] Although Dewey is known best for his publications concerning education, he also wrote about many other topics, including experience, nature, art, logic, inquiry, democracy, and ethics. In his advocacy of democracy, Dewey considered two fundamental elements-schools and civil society-as being major topics needing attention and reconstruction to encourage experimental intelligence and plurality. Dewey asserted that complete democracy was to be obtained not just by extending voting rights but also by ensuring that there exists a fully-formed public opinion, accomplished by effective communication among citizens, experts, and politicians, with the latter being accountable for the policies they adopt.
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Table of Contents

PART I THE PROBLEM OF TRAINING THOUGHT
I. WHAT IS THOUGHT?
II. THE NEED FOR TRAINING THOUGHT
III. NATURAL RESOURCES IN THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
IV. SCHOOL CONDITIONS AND THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
V. THE MEANS AND AND END OF MENTAL TRAINING: THE PSYCHOLOGICAL AND THE LOGICAL
PART II LOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
VI. THE ANALYSIS OF A COMPLETE ACT OF THOUGHT
VII. SYSTEMATIC INFERENCE: INDUCTION AND DEDUCTION
VIII. JUDGMENT: THE INTERPRETATION OF FACTS
IX. MEANING: OR CONCEPTIONS AND UNDERSTANDING
X. CONCRETE AND ABSTRACT THINKING
XI. EMPIRICAL AND SCIENTIFIC THINKING
PART III THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
XII. ACTIVITY AND THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
XIII. LANGUAGE AND THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
XIV. OBSERVATION AND INFORMATION IN THE TRAINING OF MIND
XV. THE RECITATION AND THE TRAINING OF THOUGHT
XVI. SOME GENERAL CONCLUSIONS
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2008

    A reviewer

    I located this book during my search for a better way of educating my grandchildren. I asked my self, 'What does learning mean?' and 'What does teaching mean?' The public school system tries to turn learning into work 'tasks'. Mr. Dewey sets the record straight. Children learn at play. Once the emphasis shifts to products 'grades' learning is pushed aside. Mr. Dewey challenges you to stop thinking. It can't be done. He says you didn't start it and you can not stop it. You can only try to do it better. The first chapters of this book are slow reading. Here Mr. Dewey defines the thinking process. The book is small because every sentence contributes to the whole. The last half of the book reads more easily as he explains judgement and meaning. He clearly defines concrete and abstract thinking. This book contains so much information that reading it once will not be enough. You will understand your spiritual side more clearly. I can't tell you how many biblical references his dialog caused me to recall (e.g. Meaning: Let your, 'Yes' MEAN 'Yes'.) Thinking requires meaning. Mr. Dewey gives new meaning to thinking and vice-versa. I just can't say enough good things about this book. This is what education really means.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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