How We Think (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) by John Dewey, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
How We Think (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

How We Think (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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by John Dewey
     
 

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This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 
At a time when we are incessantly bombarded with factoids and infomercials, John Dewey's How We Think advises us to step back from the noisy clutter of the information age. The acquisition of information, no matter how voluminous, by itself, is neither

Overview


This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.
 
At a time when we are incessantly bombarded with factoids and infomercials, John Dewey's How We Think advises us to step back from the noisy clutter of the information age. The acquisition of information, no matter how voluminous, by itself, is neither knowledge nor critical thinking. In How We Think, Dewey provides a clear but profound philosophical analysis of how we transform ideas into instruments to solve our personal, social, and political problems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411468320
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/13/2012
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
1,014,899
File size:
310 KB

Meet the Author


John Dewey (l859-l952) remains one of America's most influential philosophers and educators. The ninety-three years of Dewey's life spanned a series of momentous events that shaped modern thought. Consistently a liberal, he was an active participant and commentator on the major events that took place during his lifetime, including the progressive movement, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the war against Fascism and Nazism.

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How We Think (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I located this book during my search for a better way of educating my grandchildren. I asked my self, 'What does learning mean?' and 'What does teaching mean?' The public school system tries to turn learning into work 'tasks'. Mr. Dewey sets the record straight. Children learn at play. Once the emphasis shifts to products 'grades' learning is pushed aside. Mr. Dewey challenges you to stop thinking. It can't be done. He says you didn't start it and you can not stop it. You can only try to do it better. The first chapters of this book are slow reading. Here Mr. Dewey defines the thinking process. The book is small because every sentence contributes to the whole. The last half of the book reads more easily as he explains judgement and meaning. He clearly defines concrete and abstract thinking. This book contains so much information that reading it once will not be enough. You will understand your spiritual side more clearly. I can't tell you how many biblical references his dialog caused me to recall (e.g. Meaning: Let your, 'Yes' MEAN 'Yes'.) Thinking requires meaning. Mr. Dewey gives new meaning to thinking and vice-versa. I just can't say enough good things about this book. This is what education really means.
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rachel44 More than 1 year ago
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