How & Why Sam Walton Invented Wal-Mart by Vance Trimble | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
How & Why Sam Walton Invented Wal-Mart

How & Why Sam Walton Invented Wal-Mart

by Vance Trimble
     
 
Ex-Army Captain Sam Walton, at the end of WWII, doggedly pushed a dismal Arkansas five-and-dime and $25,00 family loan via a commonplace business stratagem into the Wal-Mart miracle that one time catapulted him into America's richest man with $9 billion in his pile. Sam's bright idea was to beg wholesalers to cut their profit margin so his store could sell cheaper.

Overview

Ex-Army Captain Sam Walton, at the end of WWII, doggedly pushed a dismal Arkansas five-and-dime and $25,00 family loan via a commonplace business stratagem into the Wal-Mart miracle that one time catapulted him into America's richest man with $9 billion in his pile. Sam's bright idea was to beg wholesalers to cut their profit margin so his store could sell cheaper. They laughed in his face. But he found smart variety store execs and money and, as everyone knows, made it work. This intimate biography details fully his boyhood, college days, romance, and his early business blunders. It crackles with the human side--Sam's love of quail hunting and rather casual flying, on to his physicians' account of his heroic but futile fight against cancer.

Editorial Reviews

Chicago Tribune Chicago Tribune
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Vance Trimble notes Walton could be a front for a bizarre James Bond villain, but style makes the man.

--Chicago Tribune
New York Times New York Times
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Vance Trimble records the major reasons for Walton's success ...

--New York Times
Publishers Weekly Publishers Weekly
This well-written Horatio Alger-like tale of ... Sam Walton it is refreshingly upbeat in contrast to the life stories of other contemporary entrepreneurs.

--Publishers Weekly
Los Angeles Times Los Angeles Times
The real-life Walton no doubt resembles the inspiring hard-working, just-folks executive depicted here ...

--Los Angeles Times
bookviewzine.com bookviewzine.com
I really enjoyed the read ... fantastic story ... I'm looking forward to reading his other business biographies.

--bookviewzine.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013690738
Publisher:
Vance Trimble
Publication date:
01/16/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Vance H. Trimble was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting in 1960 in recognition of his exposé of nepotism and payroll abuse in the U.S. Congress. For this work, Trimblewas awarded the other two top prizes for "distinguished Washington correspondence," the Raymond Clapper and the Sigma Delta Chi, honoring him as a rarity in American journalism-- "a Triple Crown winner."
Born in Arkansas in 1913, Vance Trimble grew up in Oklahoma where at age 14 he became a cub reporter: on The Okemah Daily Leader. He went on to reporting and desk work on daily newspapers in Wewoka, Seminole, Muskogee, Okmulgee, and Tulsa.
During the Depression, Trimble freelanced as a typewriter\adding machine repairman, traveling the South for a year in a rusty $35 1926 Chevy.
In 1955, Trimble was promoted from managing editor of The Houston Press to news editor of the Scripps-Howard national bureau in Washington, D.C.
"I grew a little restless by my desk job," says Trimble. "In Houston, I was under deadline pressure, working fast. My new job seemed to slow. So in my spare time, I began roaming Capitol Hill."
Soon his digging unearthed scandalous nepotism and payroll shenanigans in Congressional offices. The Scripps-Howard news wire planted his daily stories on page ones from New York to San Francisco. These exclusives continued for six months. TIME magazine admiringly profiled him as "The Digger on Capitol Hill." The cheating revelations outraged the public. Because of this grass roots outcry, the U. S. Senate, voted to relax its secrecy on office payrolls. In its page 1 headline, The Washington Daily News hailed this as "A Victory for the Taxpayers and Vance Trimble."
Trimble is author of 13 hardcover books, the first being a history of hyperbaric medicine. Others include bios of Sam Walton, FedEx's Fred Smith, publisher E.W. Scripps, baseball commissioner "Happy" Chandler.

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