Howards End(Classics Series) by E.M. Forster

Howards End(Classics Series) by E.M. Forster

by E. M. Forster
     
 

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Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. The main theme is the difficulties, troubles, and also the benefits of relationships between members of different social classes. Many critics, including Lionel Trilling, consider Howards End "undoubtedly Forster's masterpiece".[1]

Overview

Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. The main theme is the difficulties, troubles, and also the benefits of relationships between members of different social classes. Many critics, including Lionel Trilling, consider Howards End "undoubtedly Forster's masterpiece".[1]

In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Howards End 38th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013039698
Publisher:
Granto Classic Books
Publication date:
08/23/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,175,735
File size:
364 KB

Meet the Author

Forster was born into an Anglo-Irish and Welsh middle-class family at 6 Melcombe Place, Dorset Square, London NW1, in a building that no longer exists. He was the only child of Edward Morgan Llewellyn Forster, an architect, and Alice Clara "Lily" (née Whichelo). His name was officially registered as Henry Morgan Forster, but at his baptism he was accidentally named Edward Morgan Forster.[1] To distinguish him from his father, he was always called Morgan thereafter. His father died of consumption on 30 October 1880, before Morgan's 2nd birthday.[2] Among Forster's ancestors were members of the Clapham Sect. He inherited £8,000 (£659,300 as of 2011),[3] from his paternal great-aunt Marianne Thornton (daughter of the abolitionist Henry Thornton), who died on 5 November 1887.[4] The money was enough to live on and enabled him to become a writer. He attended the famous public school Tonbridge School in Kent as a day boy. The theatre at the school is named after him.[5]

At King's College, Cambridge, between 1897 and 1901,[6] he became a member of a discussion society known as the Apostles (formally named the Cambridge Conversazione Society). Many of its members went on to constitute what came to be known as the Bloomsbury Group, of which Forster was a peripheral member in the 1910s and 1920s. There is a famous recreation of Forster's Cambridge at the beginning of The Longest Journey.

After leaving university he travelled in continental Europe with his mother. He visited Egypt, Germany and India with the classicist Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson in 1914. By that time, Forster had written all but one of his novels.[7] In the First World War, as a conscientious objector, he volunteered for the International Red Cross, travelling to Alexandria, Egypt.

Forster spent a second spell in India in the early 1920s as the private secretary to Tukojirao III, the Maharajah of Dewas. The Hill of Devi is his non-fictional account of this trip. After returning from India, he completed his last novel, A Passage to India (1924), for which he won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction. He also edited the graphic letters from India of Eliza Fay (1756–1816).

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 1, 1879
Date of Death:
June 7, 1970
Place of Birth:
London
Place of Death:
Coventry, England
Education:
B. A. in classics, King's College, Cambridge, 1900; B. A. in history, 1901; M.A., 1910

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