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HTML5: Up and Running

Overview

If you don't know about the new features available in HTML5, now's the time to find out. This book provides practical information about how and why the latest version of this markup language will significantly change the way you develop for the Web.

HTML5 is still evolving, yet browsers such as Safari, Mozilla, Opera, and Chrome already support many of its features ? and mobile browsers are even farther ahead. HTML5: Up & Running carefully guides you though the important ...

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HTML5: Up and Running

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Overview

If you don't know about the new features available in HTML5, now's the time to find out. This book provides practical information about how and why the latest version of this markup language will significantly change the way you develop for the Web.

HTML5 is still evolving, yet browsers such as Safari, Mozilla, Opera, and Chrome already support many of its features — and mobile browsers are even farther ahead. HTML5: Up & Running carefully guides you though the important changes in this version with lots of hands-on examples, including markup, graphics, and screenshots. You'll learn how to use HTML5 markup to add video, offline capabilities, and more — and you’ll be able to put that functionality to work right away.

  • Learn new semantic elements, such as <header>, <footer>, and <section>
  • Meet Canvas, a 2D drawing surface you can program with JavaScript
  • Embed video in your web pages without third-party plugins
  • Use Geolocation to let web application visitors share their physical location
  • Take advantage of local storage capacity that goes way beyond cookies
  • Build offline web applications that work after network access is disconnected
  • Learn about several new input types for web forms
  • Create your own custom vocabularies in HTML5 with microdata
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596806026
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/24/2010
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 205
  • Sales rank: 949,900
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Pilgrim works as a developer advocate for Google, specializing inopen source and open standards. You may remember him from such classics as Greasemonkey Hacks (O'Reilly), Dive Into Python (Apress), and Dive Into Python 3 (APress). He lives in North Carolina with his wife, two boys, and a big slobbery dog.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
Diving In;
Conventions Used in This Book;
Using Code Examples;
A Note on the Editions of This Book;
Safari® Books Online;
How to Contact Us;
Chapter 1: How Did We Get Here?;
1.1 Diving In;
1.2 MIME Types;
1.3 A Long Digression into How Standards Are Made;
1.4 An Unbroken Line;
1.5 A Timeline of HTML Development from 1997 to 2004;
1.6 Everything You Know About XHTML Is Wrong;
1.7 A Competing Vision;
1.8 What Working Group?;
1.9 Back to the W3C;
1.10 Postscript;
1.11 Further Reading;
Chapter 2: Detecting HTML5 Features;
2.1 Diving In;
2.2 Detection Techniques;
2.3 Modernizr: An HTML5 Detection Library;
2.4 Canvas;
2.5 Canvas Text;
2.6 Video;
2.7 Video Formats;
2.8 Local Storage;
2.9 Web Workers;
2.10 Offline Web Applications;
2.11 Geolocation;
2.12 Input Types;
2.13 Placeholder Text;
2.14 Form Autofocus;
2.15 Microdata;
2.16 Further Reading;
Chapter 3: What Does It All Mean?;
3.1 Diving In;
3.2 The Doctype;
3.3 The Root Element;
3.4 The Element;
3.5 New Semantic Elements in HTML5;
3.6 A Long Digression into How Browsers Handle Unknown Elements;
3.7 Headers;
3.8 Articles;
3.9 Dates and Times;
3.10 Navigation;
3.11 Footers;
3.12 Further Reading;
Chapter 4: Let’s Call It a Draw(ing Surface);
4.1 Diving In;
4.2 Simple Shapes;
4.3 Canvas Coordinates;
4.4 Paths;
4.5 Text;
4.6 Gradients;
4.7 Images;
4.8 What About IE?;
4.9 A Complete Example;
4.10 Further Reading;
Chapter 5: Video on the Web;
5.1 Diving In;
5.2 Video Containers;
5.3 Video Codecs;
5.4 Audio Codecs;
5.5 What Works on the Web;
5.6 Licensing Issues with H.264 Video;
5.7 Encoding Ogg Video with Firefogg;
5.8 Batch Encoding Ogg Video with ffmpeg2theora;
5.9 Encoding H.264 Video with HandBrake;
5.10 Batch Encoding H.264 Video with HandBrake;
5.11 Encoding WebM Video with ffmpeg;
5.12 At Last, the Markup;
5.13 What About IE?;
5.14 A Complete Example;
5.15 Further Reading;
Chapter 6: You Are Here (And So Is Everybody Else);
6.1 Diving In;
6.2 The Geolocation API;
6.3 Show Me the Code;
6.4 Handling Errors;
6.5 Choices! I Demand Choices!;
6.6 What About IE?;
6.7 geo.js to the Rescue;
6.8 A Complete Example;
6.9 Further Reading;
Chapter 7: The Past, Present, and Future of Local Storage for Web Applications;
7.1 Diving In;
7.2 A Brief History of Local Storage Hacks Before HTML5;
7.3 Introducing HTML5 Storage;
7.4 Using HTML5 Storage;
7.5 HTML5 Storage in Action;
7.6 Beyond Named Key/Value Pairs: Competing Visions;
7.7 Further Reading;
Chapter 8: Let’s Take This Offline;
8.1 Diving In;
8.2 The Cache Manifest;
8.3 The Flow of Events;
8.4 The Fine Art of Debugging, a.k.a. “Kill Me! Kill Me Now!”;
8.5 Let’s Build One!;
8.6 Further Reading;
Chapter 9: A Form of Madness;
9.1 Diving In;
9.2 Placeholder Text;
9.3 Autofocus Fields;
9.4 Email Addresses;
9.5 Web Addresses;
9.6 Numbers As Spinboxes;
9.7 Numbers As Sliders;
9.8 Date Pickers;
9.9 Search Boxes;
9.10 Color Pickers;
9.11 And One More Thing...;
9.12 Further Reading;
Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words;
10.1 Diving In;
10.2 What Is Microdata?;
10.3 The Microdata Data Model;
10.4 Marking Up People;
10.5 Marking Up Organizations;
10.6 Marking Up Events;
10.7 Marking Up Reviews;
10.8 Further Reading;
The All-in-One Almost-Alphabetical Guide to Detecting Everything;
List of Elements;
Further Reading;
Colophon;

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 29, 2010

    Mostly Up and Running

    HTML5 is the latest "big deal" in web development, and for good reason. It allows us to build interactive websites without the need for add-ons like Adobe Flash. But it's also the foundation of a whole new class of deliverables like iOS apps, iTunes LP, iTunes Extras, and iAds. And while those are all Apple-related right now, there's no reason they can't be used everywhere. The downside is that HTML5 is not complete, and won't be for a long time. But what most people think of as HTML5 is actually a combination of HTML, CSS and Javascript. Right now. While you can find an endless supply of books for each, none has yet covered the new context of manipulating DOM elements (or even explaining them), the canvas, local storage and all the other new goodies.

    That's where the gold rush brings us in 2010. A number of "HTML5" books were promised as early as last November, only to be delayed again and again. "HTML5: Up and Running" from O'Reilly immediately went to the top of my watch list, since I have a shelf of O'Reilly books already and it would be in good company. It too was pushed back from the original release date, but not by much, and now I have it in my grubby fingers, and it was worth the wait. Mostly.

    The first chapter is quick reading, and actually pretty interesting considering it's just a history of HTML. Old emails from names like Marc Andreessen and Tim Berners-Lee arguing over the img tag, and how we ultimately ended up with the current format, are entertaining. Ok, next. Chapter 2 covers compatibility, since not all web browsers support every piece of the HTML5 moving target, and how to detect if your visitor can see what you're trying to show them. Then we get a detailed but quick run-through on canvas, 2-D drawing, video codecs, geo-location, local data storage, offline web apps and new form elements. Chapter 10 wraps things up by future-proofing HTML5 and sneaking microdata annotations into your code, and tries to lay down some standards for different types of data in a way compatible with Google's Rich Snippets. This is followed by a very handy alphabetical guide to detecting the new stuff, and a standard index.

    What's not to like? Well, by the time I finish typing this sentence some of the topics in the book may have changed. Those changes are likely documented somewhere online for free. Three days ago, for example, the MPEG LA group declared that H.264 video will be royalty-free forever. That could set it up as the favored web video standard going forward. Not that this makes the nine pages on encoding Ogg Theora video a waste, but maybe more time could have been spent on interactive UI elements, animation, CSS or 3-D drawing inside the browser instead of external video generation. And when I said "quick run-through" of some elements, I meant it. The chapter on forms, for example, shows how to fall back when using the new autofocus tag, by using Javascript for older browsers. But it doesn't have any fallback example for the placeholder tag.

    This book is a foothold, however, and a necessary step to fill the holes in one's background. Like I said, these are the first books to cover actually using HTML, CSS and Javascript together as the new trinity of web development. The diagrams and code examples for canvas, as an example, are more clear in "HTML5: Up and Running" than anything I had found previously online. Looking forward to the next in the series.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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