Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in an Ancient Chinese Medical Text / Edition 1

Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in an Ancient Chinese Medical Text / Edition 1

by Paul U. Unschuld
     
 

ISBN-10: 0520233220

ISBN-13: 9780520233225

Pub. Date: 04/08/2003

Publisher: University of California Press

The Huang Di nei jing su wen, known familiarly as the Su wen, is a seminal text of ancient Chinese medicine, yet until now there has been no comprehensive, detailed analysis of its development and contents. At last Paul U. Unschuld offers entry into this still-vital artifact of China’s cultural and intellectual past.

Unschuld traces the

Overview

The Huang Di nei jing su wen, known familiarly as the Su wen, is a seminal text of ancient Chinese medicine, yet until now there has been no comprehensive, detailed analysis of its development and contents. At last Paul U. Unschuld offers entry into this still-vital artifact of China’s cultural and intellectual past.

Unschuld traces the history of the Su wen to its origins in the final centuries B.C.E., when numerous authors wrote short medical essays to explain the foundations of human health and illness on the basis of the newly developed vessel theory. He examines the meaning of the title and the way the work has been received throughout Chinese medical history, both before and after the eleventh century when the text as it is known today emerged. Unschuld’s survey of the contents includes illuminating discussions of the yin-yang and five-agents doctrines, the perception of the human body and its organs, qi and blood, pathogenic agents, concepts of disease and diagnosis, and a variety of therapies, including the new technique of acupuncture. An extensive appendix, furthermore, offers a detailed introduction to the complicated climatological theories of Wu yun liu qi ("five periods and six qi"), which were added to the Su wen by Wang Bing in the Tang era.


In an epilogue, Unschuld writes about the break with tradition and innovative style of thought represented by the Su wen. For the first time, health care took the form of "medicine," in that it focused on environmental conditions, climatic agents, and behavior as causal in the emergence of disease and on the importance of natural laws in explaining illness. Unschuld points out that much of what we surmise about the human organism is simply a projection, reflecting dominant values and social goals, and he constructs a hypothesis to explain the formation and acceptance of basic notions of health and disease in a given society. Reading the Su wen, he says, not only offers a better understanding of the roots of Chinese medicine as an integrated aspect of Chinese civilization; it also provides a much needed starting point for discussions of the differences and parallels between European and Chinese ways of dealing with illness and the risk of early death.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780520233225
Publisher:
University of California Press
Publication date:
04/08/2003
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
536
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.50(d)

Table of Contents

Prefatory Remarksix
I.Bibliographic History of the Su Wen
1.Some Scholarly Views on the Origin of the Su wen1
2.References to Huang Di nei jing and Su wen in Early Bibliographic Sources3
II.The Meaning of the Title Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen
1.Huang Di8
2.Nei14
3.Jing16
4.Su wen18
III.Early Su Wen Texts and Commentaries Before the Eleventh Century
1.Huangfu Mi and the Jia yi jing22
2.Quan Yuanqi and the Su wen xun jie24
3.Yang Shangshan and the Huang Di nei jing tai su26
3.1.History and Reconstruction of a Tai su Text in Japan26
3.2.The Issue of the Chinese Master Copies of the Tai su27
3.3.Yang Shangshan's Commentaries33
4.Wang Bing's Su wen Edition of A.D. 76239
4.1.Wang Bing, His Intentions and His Preface39
4.2.Structural Characteristics of the Wang Bing Edition44
4.3.Discourses 66 through 74 in Today's Su wen46
4.4.The Influence of Wang Bing's Worldview on His Su wen Edition48
4.5.Scope and Structure of Wang Bing's Commentaries51
IV.Origin and Tradition of the Textus Receptus of the Su Wen
1.The Imperial Editorial Office of 105759
2.The Scope of the Revision by Gao Baoheng et al.62
3.The Major Commentated Su wen Versions Subsequent to Gao Baoheng et al.66
3.1.Ma Shi's Huang Di nei jing su wen zhu zheng fa wei66
3.2.Wu Kun's Huang Di nei jing su wen zhu66
3.3Zhang Jiebin's Lei jing68
3.4.Zhang Zhicong's Huang Di nei jing su wen ji zhu69
3.5.Gao Shishi's Huang Di su wen zhi jie70
3.6.Zhang Qi's Su wen shi yi71
3.7.Hu Shu's Huang Di nei jing su wen jiao yi72
3.8.Yu Yue's Nei jing bian yan73
4.Two Japanese Commentated Su wen Versions of the Edo Period74
4.1.Tamba Genkan's Su wen shi74
4.2.Tamba Genken's Su wen shao shi75
V.A Survey of the Contents of the Su Wen
1.The Literary Setting76
2.The Yin-Yang Doctrine83
2.1.The Discovery of Dualism83
2.2.The Fourfold Subcategorization89
2.3.The Sixfold Subcategorization92
2.4.An Eightfold or Tenfold Subcategorization?94
2.5.Yin-Yang Physiology, Pathology, and Diagnosis96
3.The Five-Agents Doctrine99
3.1.General Remarks99
3.2.Early References to Pentic Categorizations100
3.3.Early Notions of Correspondences among Phenomena102
3.4.Early Patterns of Correspondences105
3.5.The Status Quo of the Five-Agents Doctrine in the Su wen106
3.6.The Significance of the Five-Agents Doctrine in the Su wen110
4.The Body and Its Organs124
4.1.Su wen Morphology124
4.2.Chest and Abdomen124
4.3.The Head126
4.4.The Extremities127
4.5.General Structural Elements and Mobile Agents127
4.6.Toward a Hierarchy of Human Organs129
4.7.Depots, Palaces, Containers, and Officers136
4.8.Links between Organs and Orifices141
4.9.The Organism as a System of Morphological Entities and Their Functions143
5.Blood and Qi144
5.1.Blood146
5.2.Qi149
5.3.Camp Qi and Protective Qi163
6.The Vessels167
6.1.Vessel Theory in the Mawangdui Manuscripts167
6.2.Vessel Morphology in the Su wen169
6.3.Vessel Pathology171
6.4.The Contents of the Vessels174
6.5.Vessel Flow175
7.Pathogenic Agents180
7.1.From Bugs and Demons to Natural Environmental Factors180
7.2.Wind Etiology and Pathology183
7.3.Wind Etiology and Leprosy189
7.4.Wind Etiology and Malaria191
7.5.Dampness, Cold, Heat, and Dryness194
8.Diseases198
8.1.Lifestyle and Prevention198
8.2.Ontological and Functional Views200
8.3.Disease Terminology201
8.4.Malaria206
8.5.Cough209
8.6.Lower Back Pain211
8.7.Limpness212
8.8.Block217
8.9.Recession222
8.10.Somatopsychic Diseases227
8.11.Beyond Conceptualization234
9.Examination241
9.1.General Principles241
9.2.Inspection247
9.3.Inquiries251
9.4.Three Sections and Nine Indicators252
9.5.Empirical and Conceptualized Prognosis255
9.6.Vessel Diagnosis of Disease260
9.7.Conclusion264
10.Invasive Therapies265
10.1.The Concept of Invasive Intervention266
10.2.Bloodletting268
10.3.Bloodletting to Treat Qi271
10.4.Misleading Piercing and Grand Piercing274
10.5.Genuine Qi Manipulation278
10.6.Morphological Piercing281
10.7.The Technique of Piercing282
11.Substance Therapies284
11.1.From Materia Medica to Pharmacology284
11.2.Pharmacotherapy in the Main Text of the Su wen289
11.3.Drug Qualities and Dietary Therapy294
11.4.The Dawn of Pharmacology in the "Seven Comprehensive Discourses"301
12.Heat Therapies313
12.1.Conceptual Levels prior to Vessel Theory313
12.2.Cauterization and Vessel Theory315
VI.Epilogue: Toward a Comparative Historical Anthropology of Medical Thought
1.The Su wen: Document of a New Style of Thought319
2.Social Facts, Worldviews, and Medical Ideas: Parallel Structures325
3.Philosophical Key Terms in a Medical Context338
4.Conclusion348
Notes351
AppendixThe Doctrine of the Five Periods and Six Qi in the Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen385
Bibliography495
Index503

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