Hubble Bubble, Granny Trouble

Hubble Bubble, Granny Trouble

by Tracey Corderoy, Joe Berger
     
 

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If your granny were a little bit, well, different from other grannies, would you want to change her, or would you love her just the way she is?

In this rhyming text, a little girl whose granny is (shhhh!) a witch just wants her gran to be like all the other grans, with a normal pet and nicely done hair. But when she realizes that her reformed granny is

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Overview

If your granny were a little bit, well, different from other grannies, would you want to change her, or would you love her just the way she is?

In this rhyming text, a little girl whose granny is (shhhh!) a witch just wants her gran to be like all the other grans, with a normal pet and nicely done hair. But when she realizes that her reformed granny is bored and boring, there's nothing to do but cook up a big pot of gloppy soup with granny and all of her frogs, cats, and bats!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Corderoy’s rhymes are zappy and amusing, and Berger’s drawings are charming, if not altogether original.
—The New York Times
Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
What's a young gal to do when her granny cooks very exotic soup, zooms around in her flying "car-thing," and goes to places with not only her cats but her frogs and bats too? For the granddaughter, it spells granny trouble. Granny is different; she dresses in a pointy black hat and dark clothes. Although her friends think that granny is cool when she makes things disappear, the granddaughter wants her granny to be more like other grannies. She attempts to help her granny be more conventional by taking her on the bus to town and selecting a more common house pet like a rabbit. The granddaughter changes granny's appearance with different clothes and a new hairstyle. Granny is willing to try the changes to be more ordinary for her granddaughter. Although the granddaughter is satisfied with the transformation, she notices that something is amiss. The story has a twist that young children will enjoy. The illustrations provide some additional information. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—The young narrator's grandmother has an uncanny ability to make objects disappear, and her turbo-jet broom serves as her favorite mode of transportation. Tired of taking part in her unusual excursions, the child gives her granny a makeover and encourages her to develop ordinary habits to bring normalcy to her life. Grandma, however, is simply not meant to live a traditional lifestyle, and her granddaughter eventually learns to celebrate her uniqueness in a sweetly realized ending. The narrative strongly hints at her grandmother's unusual occupation while lively, rhyming text maintains energetic pacing through repetition. "My granny's kind of different. She cooks this icky soup./I swear she uses slime and sludge and bits of froggy-poop!" There's nothing spooky in the British charm found in phrases and visual design. Hilarious details add chuckles along this pair's journey: the grandmother carries a cauldron purse; takes her granddaughter to see "Scary Poppins"; and brings along a menagerie of cats, bats, and frogs for some fun in the sun. Cartoon illustrations, emphasized in shades of deep purple and blue, remain cheerfully witchy. This is a lovely, imaginative romp, with just a pinch of playful mischief thrown in.—Meg Smith, Cumberland County Public Library, Fayetteville, NC
Kirkus Reviews
As they say, be careful what you wish for… No one wants a relative to stand out too much, especially for the wrong reasons. A young girl hopes her beloved grandmother--who just happens to be a witch--would learn to be more conventional. Corderoy sets a conversational pace to help readers sympathize with the main character's plight: "My granny's kind of different…" What follows are spreads dominated by pinks and purples that capture the peculiar occurrences that whirl around Granny wherever she goes. The rhyming text describes Granny cooking "icky soup" full of "slime and sludge and bits of froggy-poop" and driving a "crazy car" with "no roof or seats or wheels…most bizarre!" But often the text only hints at a situation gone awry, and it is Berger's hilarious digital illustrations that will have readers giggling here and squealing there. At one point the girl convinces Granny to give being "normalish" a try. The makeover initially seems a success, "but something wasn't right. She seemed like someone else's granny, strolling home that night." When Granny ends up in bed bored and sad, the girl soon realizes that grandmother's witchy ways should be celebrated instead of changed. Nestled among the burping bats and mischievous frogs, a lesson on appreciating differences is charmingly presented. Let this tale work its magic throughout the year. (Picture book. 3-6)
The New York Times
…Corderoy's rhymes are zappy and amusing, and Berger's drawings are charming…
—Pamela Paul

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763659042
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
07/10/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
971,790
Product dimensions:
9.32(w) x 11.50(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Tracey Corderoy is a teacher with a passion for literature. She was born and grew up in industrial South Wales and now lives in a hidden valley in England with her husband, two children, and an ever-increasing menagerie of devilishly-cute-but-sometimes-rather-naughty pets.

Joe Berger is a children’s author, illustrator, and cartoonist who also makes the occasional award-winning animated short film and title sequence. When he’s not working, he loves to play board games. He lives in England with his wife, three daughters, two cats, and a small dog, all of whom refuse to play board games with him.

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