Hugging the Shore: Essays and Criticism

Hugging the Shore: Essays and Criticism

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by John Updike
     
 

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Part Three Of Three Parts

Since 1960 John Updike has been writing book reviews for The New Yorker, and his contributions the last eight years make up the bulk of this volume.

On this collection, James Atlas adds that there is "the sort of ambitious scholarly reappraisal not seen in this country since the death of Edmund Wilson."

Among the authors discussed in

Overview

Part Three Of Three Parts

Since 1960 John Updike has been writing book reviews for The New Yorker, and his contributions the last eight years make up the bulk of this volume.

On this collection, James Atlas adds that there is "the sort of ambitious scholarly reappraisal not seen in this country since the death of Edmund Wilson."

Among the authors discussed in HUGGING THE SHORE are Samuel Beckett, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Isak Dinesen, Gunter Grass, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, Herman Melville, Vladimir Nabokov, Muriel Spark and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“No living American novelist can match Updike in the range and responsiveness of his reading. . . . [Literature is] a house with many mansions, and in Hugging the Shore Updike gives a splendid, striding tour.”—James Wolcott, Harper’s
 
“These reviews are models of craft—and something more. . . . Hugging the Shore bristles with erudition, energy, and (quietly asserted) high seriousness; it is also one of the year’s most entertaining books.”—Bruce Allen, The Christian Science Monitor
 
“[Updike’s is] a body of literary criticism unmatched in range, discrimination and eloquence by any American novelist since Henry James.”—The Boston Globe

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780880013987
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/28/1994
Pages:
944
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 2.10(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“No living American novelist can match Updike in the range and responsiveness of his reading. . . . [Literature is] a house with many mansions, and in Hugging the Shore Updike gives a splendid, striding tour.”—James Wolcott, Harper’s
 
“These reviews are models of craft—and something more. . . . Hugging the Shore bristles with erudition, energy, and (quietly asserted) high seriousness; it is also one of the year’s most entertaining books.”—Bruce Allen, The Christian Science Monitor
 
“[Updike’s is] a body of literary criticism unmatched in range, discrimination and eloquence by any American novelist since Henry James.”—The Boston Globe

Meet the Author

John Updike was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, in 1932. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954 and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker. His novels have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and the William Dean Howells Medal. In 2007 he received the Gold Medal for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. John Updike died in January 2009.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
March 18, 1932
Date of Death:
January 27, 2009
Place of Birth:
Shillington, Pennsylvania
Place of Death:
Beverly Farms, MA
Education:
A.B. in English, Harvard University, 1954; also studied at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art in Oxford, England

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Hugging the Shore: Essays and Criticism 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The preeminent fiction writer who is also one of America's supreme cultural critics shows his amazing range of interest, and incredible perceptiveness in this collected work of essays . The dazzling Updike line is at work in many of them .In Kierkegaardian terms I found this work a great example of the ' aesthetic man' at work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
XD XD lol, Prissy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well, using different words is always nice lol. I don't think anyone has called Seven "cute" persay. x-x
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He's not with me there. Prism is alone. Again. And hurt again. Damn people.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was verry busy and people were everywhere. I was walking around in circles for hours until i run into my uncle.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago