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Hugo and Miles In I've Painted Everything
  • Alternative view 1 of Hugo and Miles In I've Painted Everything
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Hugo and Miles In I've Painted Everything

by Scott Magoon
 

What happens when a very creative artist runs out of things to paint? Just runs out—as in, he’s painted everything!

Hugo, the artist in question, is in an elephunk, so he and his friend Miles leave Cornville for a whirlwind trip to Paris. They visit museums, parks, and landmarks. So what does happen when a very creative artist runs out of things to

Overview


What happens when a very creative artist runs out of things to paint? Just runs out—as in, he’s painted everything!

Hugo, the artist in question, is in an elephunk, so he and his friend Miles leave Cornville for a whirlwind trip to Paris. They visit museums, parks, and landmarks. So what does happen when a very creative artist runs out of things to paint? Well, he begins to see things in a very different way . . .

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The cartoon illustrations, rendered in pencil and digitally colored, provide an ample supply of visual jokes. . . . The myriad subjects of Hugo's paintings are quite amusing, and there are disguised works by Raphael, Hals, Van Gogh, and others in the museums. . . . Can spark a discussion about new ways to see everyday objects.
School Library Journal

Pencil and digitally colored illustrations add whimsical details--like an art-stealing raccoon--to the wordplay. . . . Charming.
Booklist, ALA

Selected for as a "Reading right" book for beach or bedtime.
New York Post

Publishers Weekly

Hugo, a blue pachyderm who loves to paint, is "in an elephunk." He surrounds himself with portraits of his animal friends, images of local buildings and still lifes of his favorite foods. But the paint is not yet dry on his latest masterwork (a picture of a wall socket) when he laments, "I've run out of ideas!" Hugo's friend Miles, a scruffy brown dog, proposes a getaway to Paris; there, Miles plans to test his new invention, a silver antenna-like contraption. Soon the friends are enjoying Montmartre and a dejeuner sur l'herbe(posed as in the famed Manet painting-though without the nude companion). At museums, Hugo contemplates an enormous painting of St. George and the dragon (his paintings could be "Hugo-mongous" too, says Miles) and checks out Van Gogh (he could become "Van Hugo," Miles suggests). Inspired by the Impressionists, Hugo considers painting "with light" ("Hu-glow," quips Miles), and takes in the view from the Eiffel Tower. "Wow!... Tons to draw!" Hugo exclaims. He decides to paint his hometown from rooftops, from cellars and in experimental palettes. In playful cartoons of pencil and digital color, Magoon (Ugly Fish)provides tourist views of Paris that feature recurring characters like a raccoon art thief and a perky red bird. Disappointingly, Miles never explains his invention, which is pure plot device-it is attached to the Eiffel Tower and forgotten. Instead, Magoon focuses on how Hugo gets his groove back, and budding artists will be encouraged to try fresh perspectives. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Hugo, an anthropomorphic elephant artist, suddenly discovers that he has nothing left to paint, and no ideas of what to paint next. His doggy friend Miles, who has to go to Paris, invites him to come along. Perhaps he will be inspired there. They sight-see everywhere, including the Louvre and the Musee d'Orsay, as Hugo speculates on word-play art possibilities. On their last day, atop the Eiffel Tower, they see the city differently, and Hugo finally gets an idea. Back home in Cornville, they climb to the top of the firehouse. Hugo notes that everything looks different from up there too. He realizes that he can paint everything differently, from different points of view, and never run out of ideas again. Magoon's digitally colored pencil drawings create a fantasy world "peopled" by anthropomorphic animals. But the settings are naturalistic, charmingly simplified, including picture postcard-like scenes of Parisian landmarks. There are many comic details, including funny signs, incidental characters in action, and parodies of famous paintings to go along with Hugo's word play. The final scenes showing the results of Hugo's fresh insights add meaning to his promise to change his point of view, and should inspire young reader-artists.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3
When Hugo, an elephant, finishes his painting of an electrical outlet, he realizes that he has painted everything in Cornville and is fresh out of ideas. His canine friend, Miles, suggests a trip to Paris for inspiration. Days of exploration prompt the artist to consider various possibilities, such as becoming Van Hugo, who paints impressions of his feelings; working in one color as "Hue-Go"; or creating "Hugo-mongous" canvases. But it is his vision of a completely different Paris as he views the city from atop the Eiffel Tower that finally convinces Hugo to return to Cornville where he "can paint everything all over again, only differently." The cartoon illustrations, rendered in pencil and digitally colored, pro-vide an ample supply of visual jokes. Cornville is the home of "Soft's Hardware" and "Munchie's Grocery." "Get There Air" takes Hugo and Miles to Paris and "Been There Air" flies them home. The myriad subjects of Hugo's paintings are quite amusing, and there are disguised works by Raphael, Hals, Van Gogh, and others in the museums. The paintbrushes and wrenches on the endpapers exemplify the two friends' occupations, and the French street map, passport, and guide-book on the title pages foreshadow their trip. This story, along with Michelle Markel's Dreamer from the Village: The Story of Marc Chagall (Holt, 2005), can spark a discussion about new ways to see everyday objects.
—Marianne SaccardiCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Hugo is deep in an "elephunk" because he's already "painted everything!" The buddies leave their happy hometown of Cornville for a revitalizing trip to Paris. They tour the major sights: Notre Dame, the Arc de Triomphe, Montmartre, the Louvre, Musee D'Orsay, etc. Atop the Eiffel Tower, Hugo has an epiphany: change his point of view and then paint "everything all over again, only differently." Home again with a new perspective, Hugo experiments with a variety of art media, releases his block and soon enough he's painting! Magoon contributed the appealing cartoon-inflected digital illustrations to Kara LaReau's fable on bullying for the pre-school set, Ugly Fish (2006). Unfortunately, here he displays a dated palette of creaky "artist" stereotypes (melancholy, paint-spattered clothes and the requisite studio easel). Though he tried for a fresh vision, the story is predictable, and the blocky pencil and digitally colored illustrations have a forced hipster vibe. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618646388
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/23/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


SCOTT MAGOON is an art director who has written and illustrated several acclaimed picture books, including Hugo and Miles in I’ve Painted Everything. He lives in Reading, Massachusetts.

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