The Hullabaloo ABC

Overview

Aha! Boo! Cock-a-doodle-doo! It's morning on the farm, and there are sights and sounds galore. Donkeys are braying, pigs are grunting, cows are mooing-even the jays are jabbering! From clucks and cackles to rumbles and whoops, this rollicking alphabet book takes young readers on a barnyard romp that is chock-full of noisy words they will love to hear and say out loud. Beverly Cleary's timeless text comes to life in vibrant new illustrations by Ted Rand. Here is a book that is ...
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Overview

Aha! Boo! Cock-a-doodle-doo! It's morning on the farm, and there are sights and sounds galore. Donkeys are braying, pigs are grunting, cows are mooing-even the jays are jabbering! From clucks and cackles to rumbles and whoops, this rollicking alphabet book takes young readers on a barnyard romp that is chock-full of noisy words they will love to hear and say out loud. Beverly Cleary's timeless text comes to life in vibrant new illustrations by Ted Rand. Here is a book that is guaranteed to delight a whole new generation of readers.

An alphabet book in which two children demonstrate all the fun that is to be had by making and hearing every kind of noise as they dash about on the farm.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As its title suggests, the energy level of this alphabet storybook runs high, thanks in part to Cleary's choice of verbs ("Flutter," "Jabber," "Rumble"), lively onomatopoeic sounds ("Kerchoo!" "Putt-putt," "Toot-toot") and animal noises ("Hee-haw," "Quack-quack") that lead off these 26 brief verses. Rand's (Knots on a Counting Rope) hearty watercolors endow the volume's clamorous crewa spunky trio of siblings and the animal residents of their farmwith particular appeal. Ranging from panoramic views of a timeless rural setting to close-ups of kids and critters, Rand's pictures document the antic proceedings, until a thunder storm arrives and the children are summoned back to the farmhouse. Occasional lazy rhyme schemes (e.g., rips/trip; racket/whack it) and lapses in rhythm ("N for Noises,/ Clucks and cackles./ A hawk!/ It scatters the hens/ And makes them squawk") trip the tongue. Still, Cleary teaches as she tells her story, and Rand's art is consistently divertinga winning combination in a preschool read-aloud. Ages 3-up. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1--Get ready for a noisy tour of the alphabet as two brothers and their sister whoop it up on the family farm. Each letter is given its own page, but unlike more conventional alphabet books, the main illustration doesn't necessarily focus on the letter's sound. For example, in the picture for "Kk for Kerchoo!/What a big sneeze!/It startles the rabbit/Nibbling the peas," the rabbit is front and center while the older brother is sneezing in the background. "Vv for Voice./Did someone call?/Quick! Up on the horse./Try not to fall" is illustrated by a picture of the girl mounting a horse. In the background, her parents stand on a porch and wave. The rhymes are busy and boisterous, and each cock-a-doodle-doo, grunt, hee-haw, moo, squeak, squawk, cluck, cackle, and shout is meant for reading aloud. While the original text copyright is 1960, the pictures are brand new. Rand's expert watercolor illustrations on crisp white backgrounds bring the action to life with just the slightest touch of nostalgia. His attention to detail, as in the pig's self-satisfied smirk and sister's T-shirt with the alphabet printed on front and back, adds irresistible charm. Share this with your preschool crowd or recommend it to an early-childhood teacher for a unit on farm life. Either way, it's a winner.--Alicia Eames, New York City Public Schools
Kirkus Reviews
Cleary's bouncy 1960 ABC book undergoes rejuvenation courtesy of Rand's ultra-wholesome watercolors, which have a genuine bounce of their own. Three kids and a dog dash around a farm to a rhyming text: "G for Grunt/That's the pig./Nothing moves him./He's too big." The kids and animals make lots of noise, hide in the barn during a cloudburst, and race home, muddied but still noisy in this brightly restored read-aloud. (Picture book. 3-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688151829
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/1998
  • Edition description: REVISED
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Beverly Cleary

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most popular authors. Born in McMinnville, Oregon, she lived on a farm in Yamhill until she was six and then moved to Portland. After college, as the children's librarian in Yakima, Washington, she was challenged to find stories for non-readers. She wrote her first book, Henry Huggins, inresponse to a boy's question, "Where are the books about kids like us?"

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the Amercan Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature.

Her Dear Mr. Henshaw was awarded the 1984 John Newbery Medal, and both Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. In addition, her books have won more than thirty-five statewide awards based on the votes of her young readers. Her characters, including Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, Otis Spofford, and Beezus and Ramona Quimby, as well as Ribsy, Socks, and Ralph S. Mouse, have delighted children for generations. Mrs. Cleary lives in coastal California.

Ted Rand, illustrator of Mailing May and Don't Forget.

Biography

Beverly Cleary was inadvertently doing market research for her books before she wrote them, as a young children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington. Cleary heard a lot about what kids were and weren’t responding to in literature, and she thought of her library patrons when she later sat down to write her first book.

Henry Huggins, published in 1950, was an effort to represent kids like the ones in Yakima and like the ones in her childhood neighborhood in Oregon. The bunch from Klickitat Street live in modest houses in a quiet neighborhood, but they’re busy: busy with rambunctious dogs (one Ribsy, to be precise), paper routes, robot building, school, bicycle acquisitions, and other projects. Cleary was particularly sensitive to the boys from her library days who complained that they could find nothing of interest to read – and Ralph and the Motorcycle was inspired by her son, who in fourth grade said he wanted to read about motorcycles. Fifteen years after her Henry books, Cleary would concoct the delightful story of a boy who teaches Ralph to ride his red toy motorcycle.

Cleary’s best known character, however, is a girl: Ramona Quimby, the sometimes difficult but always entertaining little sister whom Cleary follows from kindergarten to fourth grade in a series of books. Ramona is a Henry Huggins neighbor who, with her sister, got her first proper introduction in Beezus and Ramona, adding a dimension of sibling dynamics to the adventures on Klickitat Street. Cleary’s stories, so simple and so true, deftly portrayed the exasperation and exuberance of being a kid. Finally, an author seemed to understand perfectly about bossy/pesty siblings, unfair teachers, playmate politics, the joys of clubhouses and the perils of sub-mattress monsters.

Cleary is one of the rare children’s authors who has been able to engage both boys and girls on their own terms, mostly through either Henry Huggins or Ramona and Beezus. She has not limited herself to those characters, though. In 1983, she won the Newbery Medal with Dear Mr. Henshaw, the story of a boy coping with his parents’ divorce, as told through his journal entries and correspondence with his favorite author. She has also written a few books for older girls (Fifteen, The Luckiest Girl, Sister of the Bride, and Jean and Johnny) mostly focusing on first love and family relationships. A set of books for beginning readers stars four-year-old twins Jimmy and Janet.

Some of Cleary’s books – particularly her titles for young adults – may seem somewhat alien to kids whose daily lives don’t feature soda fountains, bottles of ink, or even learning cursive. Still, the author’s stories and characters stand the test of time; and she nails the basic concerns of childhood and adolescence. Her books (particularly the more modern Ramona series, which touches on the repercussions of a father’s job loss and a mother’s return to work) remain relevant classics.

Cleary has said in an essay that she wrote her two autobiographical books, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, "because I wanted to tell young readers what life was like in safer, simpler, less-prosperous times, so different from today." She has conveyed that safer, simpler era -- still fraught with its own timeless concerns -- to children in her fiction as well, more than half a century after her first books were released.

Good To Know

Word processing is not Cleary's style. She writes, "I write in longhand on yellow legal pads. Some pages turn out right the first time (hooray!), some pages I revise once or twice and some I revise half-a-dozen times. I then attack my enemy the typewriter and produce a badly typed manuscript which I take to a typist whose fingers somehow hit the right keys. No, I do not use a computer. Everybody asks."

Cleary usually starts her books on January 2.

Up until she was six, Cleary lived in Yamhill, Oregon -- a town so small it had no library. Cleary's mother took up the job of librarian, asking for books to be sent from the state branch and lending them out from a lodge room over a bank. It was, Clearly remembers, "a dingy room filled with shabby leather-covered chairs and smelling of stale cigar smoke. The books were shelved in a donated china cabinet. It was there I made the most magical discovery: There were books written especially for children!"

Cleary authored a series of tie-in books in the early 1960s for classic TV show Leave It to Beaver.

Cleary's books appear in over 20 countries in 14 languages.

Cleary's book The Luckiest Girl is based in part on her own young adulthood, when a cousin of her mother's offered to take Beverly for the summer and have her attend Chaffey Junior College in Ontario, California. Cleary went from there to the University of California at Berkeley.

The actress Sarah Polley got her start playing Ramona in the late ‘80s TV series. Says Cleary in a Q & A on her web site: “I won’t let go of the rights for television productions unless I have script approval. There have been companies that have wanted the movie rights to Ramona, but they won’t let me have script approval, and so I say no. I did have script approval for the television productions of the Ramona series…. I thought Sarah Polley was a good little actress, a real little professional.”

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    1. Also Known As:
      Beverly Atlee Bunn (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Carmel, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 12, 1916
    2. Place of Birth:
      McMinnville, Oregon
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1938; B.A. in librarianship, University of Washington (Seattle), 1939

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