Human Behavior and the Developing Brain by Geraldine Dawson, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Human Behavior and the Developing Brain

Human Behavior and the Developing Brain

by Geraldine Dawson
     
 

Over the past few decades, innovative, noninvasive techniques for studying the activity of the brain have provided new insights into brain-behavior relations. Now, developmental scientists are using these techniques with young infants and children to shed light on the neural underpinnings of the developmental process. This highly enlightening text brings together a

Overview

Over the past few decades, innovative, noninvasive techniques for studying the activity of the brain have provided new insights into brain-behavior relations. Now, developmental scientists are using these techniques with young infants and children to shed light on the neural underpinnings of the developmental process. This highly enlightening text brings together a group of world-renowned scientists who believe, and demonstrate, that understanding brain-behavior relations from a developmental standpoint will yield fresh and unique insights into human nature.

This volume—one of a limited number of texts that provide a voice for a growing new generation of developmentalists interested in the brain—is distinguished by its breadth of topics, which include the development of memory, cognition, and emotions, and individual differences in these domains.

The editors have divided the book into four sections. Section I provides a historical review and broad theoretical framework for considering brain-behavior relations from a developmental perspective. The role of electrophysiology (EEG) in developmental research is also examined. Chapters in Section II focus on developmental changes in the brain, as indexed by changes in synaptic connections, glucose metabolism, and EEG power and coherence. Using changes in neural activity as indicators of important developmental transitions, a biological perspective on human psychological development is offered.

Section III addresses concepts of developing brain behavior relations. Neural correlates of developmental processes pertaining to memory, emotional expression and emotion regulation, spatial representation, and language are discussed.

Finally, Section IV examines brain activity as a predictor of individual differences in behavior. Authors explore the use of electrophysiological measures in early infancy to explain individual differences in temperament, affective style, language, and attentional abilities.

While accessible to those with little background in the neurosciences, this book adequately portrays the complexity and depth of brain-behavior relations in development. An important resource for investigators in the fields of developmental psychology, neuropsychology, behavioral neuroscience, clinical psychology, and education, it also serves as a textbook for graduate students, especially advanced students of human psychological development.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[This book] takes development, brain, and behavior each as seriously as they need to be taken, and forges genuinely new links among them. Developmental psychologists, child clinicians, and developmental neuroscientists will all find much of value in this volume." —Bruce Pennington, PhD

"A lovely volume that fills a void....This book provides the reader with an excellent overview of research on electrophysiology of brain development and behavior. It includes some very good reviews of basic brain development and serves as an excellent supplemental text for graduate courses. Human Behavior and the Developing Brain is invaluable to a broad audience—from researchers who want an overview of the area to professionals working in the field." —Megan Gunnar, PhD

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Warren D. Rosen, PhD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This book presents current knowledge on developmental neuropsychology. The contributors provide historical perspectives, current data, and theoretical inference regarding normal brain development, the development of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral capabilities, and their interrelationships.
Purpose: The purpose is to present in one volume current theory and research regarding the neurological mediation of psychological development that accounts for continuous and discontinuous progression, addressing normative development and individual differences. The field of developmental neuropsychology has had a need for just such a book. Allowing for constraints caused by technological limitations in neurological assessment and the infancy of such research, the selected chapters admirably represent the state of the field.
Audience: This book is designed for developmental psychology graduate students, who may well need significant background in neuroscience to make best use of the readings. The authors present a well-integrated and insightful overview of the book in the preface, and the contributors are central voices in their respective areas.
Features: The book makes excellent use of graphs and neuroimaging illustrations, with clarifying descriptions. The references are suitably representative of seminal works up to currently obtained data in press. The structural features of the book are comfortably functional.
Assessment: In the field of child neuropsychology, which has long emphasized adult models and pathology in development, this volume could not be more timely. In emphasizing both cognitive and emotional development, it is as important to the clinical child neuropsychologist as to the developmental neuroscientist. This book could easily be the backbone of a superb upper-level graduate course.
3 Stars from Doody
Warren D. Rosen
This book presents current knowledge on developmental neuropsychology. The contributors provide historical perspectives, current data, and theoretical inference regarding normal brain development, the development of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral capabilities, and their interrelationships. The purpose is to present in one volume current theory and research regarding the neurological mediation of psychological development that accounts for continuous and discontinuous progression, addressing normative development and individual differences. The field of developmental neuropsychology has had a need for just such a book. Allowing for constraints caused by technological limitations in neurological assessment and the infancy of such research, the selected chapters admirably represent the state of the field. This book is designed for developmental psychology graduate students, who may well need significant background in neuroscience to make best use of the readings. The authors present a well-integrated and insightful overview of the book in the preface, and the contributors are central voices in their respective areas. The book makes excellent use of graphs and neuroimaging illustrations, with clarifying descriptions. The references are suitably representative of seminal works up to currently obtained data in press. The structural features of the book are comfortably functional. In the field of child neuropsychology, which has long emphasized adult models and pathology in development, this volume could not be more timely. In emphasizing both cognitive and emotional development, it is as important to the clinical child neuropsychologist as to the developmental neuroscientist. This bookcould easily be the backbone of a superb upper-level graduate course.
Booknews
The field is a dynamic intermingling of developmental psychology and neuroscience and has much to offer in this Decade of the Brain. This text provides a historical review and theoretical framework and then focuses on developmental changes in the brain, as indexed by changes in synaptic connections, glucose metabolism, and EEG power and coherence. Neural correlates of developmental processes pertaining to memory, emotional expression, spatial representation, and language are discussed, as is brain activity as a predictor of individual differences in behavior. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780898620924
Publisher:
Guilford Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
02/28/1994
Pages:
568
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle, is editor of Autism: Nature, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Internationally recognized for her scientific research on autism and developmental psychopathology, particularly the effects of early experience on development, she earned her doctorate in developmental and child clinical psychology at the University of Washington, and received postdoctoral training at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute.

Kurt W. Fischer, Ph.D., is Professor of Education in the Department of Human Development and Psychology at Harvard University, where he is leading an initiative to focus on diversity in development and its implications for education. During 1992-1993, he was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, where he organized a group on Dynamic Modeling of Growth and Development.

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