Human Development Across the Lifespan / Edition 2

Human Development Across the Lifespan / Edition 2

1.5 2
by John S. Dacey, John F. Travers
     
 

ISBN-10: 069712732X

ISBN-13: 9780697127327

Pub. Date: 11/28/1993

Publisher: Brown & Benchmark

This chronologically-organized text's succinct coverage and examples that relate effectively to education, nursing, and psychology majors have made this book a favorite with professors and students. Along with updated citations and examples, this edition includes increased coverage of exceptional individuals, thoroughly revised adulthood chapters, and increased…  See more details below

Overview

This chronologically-organized text's succinct coverage and examples that relate effectively to education, nursing, and psychology majors have made this book a favorite with professors and students. Along with updated citations and examples, this edition includes increased coverage of exceptional individuals, thoroughly revised adulthood chapters, and increased integration of web and media resources.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780697127327
Publisher:
Brown & Benchmark
Publication date:
11/28/1993
Pages:
688
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.45(h) x (d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:
PART I INTRODUCTION
Chapter 1 - Lifespan Psychology: An Introduction
Chapter 2 - Theories of Development: Interpreting the Lifespan
PART II BEGINNINGS
Chapter 3 - The Biological Basis of Development
Chapter 4 - Pregnancy and Birth
PART III INFANCY
Chapter 5 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Infancy
Chapter 6 - Psychosocial Development in Infancy
PART IV EARLY CHILDHOOD
Chapter 7 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood
Chapter 8 - Psychosocial Development in Early Childhood
PART V MIDDLE CHILDHOOD
Chapter 9 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood
Chapter 10 - Psychosocial Development in Middle Childhood
PART VI ADOLESCENCE
Chapter 11 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Adolescence
Chapter 12 - Psychosocial Development in Adolescence
PART VII EARLY ADULTHOOD
Chapter 13 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Early Adulthood
Chapter 14 - Psychosocial Development in Early Adulthood
PART VIII MIDDLE ADULTHOOD
Chapter 15 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Middle Adulthood
Chapter 16 - Psychosocial Development in Middle Adulthood
PART IX LATE ADULTHOOD
Chapter 17 - Physical and Cognitive Development in Late Adulthood
Chapter 18 - Psychosocial Development in Late Adulthood
Chapter 19 - Dying and Spirituality
Glossary

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Human Development Across the Lifespan 1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Derrick93 More than 1 year ago
Homosexuality is given a scant two pages out of 587, and most of these two pages consists of a photo from an AIDS awareness march. The heading of this section, "Homosexual Behavior," is a misnomer, because no discussion of behavior takes place. Instead, the CAUSES of homosexuality are discussed. The authors adopt a pathological view that homosexual behavior is a sickness, and every sickness must have a cause. The first cause given is the psychoanalytic one, blaming parents for the homosexuality of their offspring. The second cause claims that homosexuals LEARN to be gay from an unknown source. Underwear advertisements in the newspaper? The third cause dwells on what the authors call "biopsychosocial factors." (The word "biopsychosocial" is a favorite of the authors. It means "we don't have an effin' clue.") Following this insult upon homosexuals are four pages with the heading, "Heterosexual Behavior." Now the authors show no interest in CAUSES whatsoever. Instead, they actually discuss heterosexual behavior. The disparity between the treatment of homosexuality and heterosexuality is clear both here and elsewhere. Throughout the text, the authors claim that opposite-sex attraction is a "necessary" part of human development and that those who do not progress to that stage are stuck in an infantile stage (e.g. the anal stage of Freud). The authors praise bigot G. Stanley Hall to the heavens, because he advocated beating gays with fists, stones, and clubs, and ostracizing promiscuous women (see p.292 for a passage that receives no admonishment whatsoever). On p. 315, one of the warning signs for suicidal adolescents, besides substance abuse, is "being homosexual," as though queer identity automatically comes with a death wish. No advice, insight or information is offered to gay readers, not even once throughout 587 pages, suggesting that the authors would really prefer gays to kill themselves. Half of p. 33 is devoted to a picture of a heterosexual couple holding hands, while Erikson is quoted: "A sense of intimacy with another person of the opposite gender SHOULD DEVELOP between the ages of 18 and 35. IF IT DOES NOT, A SENSE OF ISOLATION RESULTS." This is another gratuitous slap in the face by the authors. For my part, I do not feel isolated, but perhaps they missed me, during their worldwide survey of all the homosexuals. On p. 345, in the blue segment, fourth paragraph, homosexuality is acknowledged as one of the areas of greatest change in our attitudes toward sexuality. But in the very next paragraph, the authors equate homosexuality with a "problem" facing adolescents along with such horrors as AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancy. Conservatives cannot be fond of a text that splashes the Democratic President on pgs. 3-4 along with a fawning biography. Republicans may no longer regard the Kennedys as a threat, but that prominent Democratic family receives adulation on pgs. 199 and 270.