Human Nature and Conduct

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Overview

Influential work by the great educator/philosopher maintains that the key to social psychology lies in an understanding of the many varieties of habit; individual mental activity is guided by subordinate factors of impulse and intelligence. His investigation focuses on three main areas of conduct: habit, impulse, and intelligence, with each factor receiving an incisive treatment.

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Human Nature and Conduct

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Overview

Influential work by the great educator/philosopher maintains that the key to social psychology lies in an understanding of the many varieties of habit; individual mental activity is guided by subordinate factors of impulse and intelligence. His investigation focuses on three main areas of conduct: habit, impulse, and intelligence, with each factor receiving an incisive treatment.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
In this reprint of his 1922 work, John Dewey (1859-1952) lays out his philosophy of human morality. He argues that morality must be grounded in an understanding of human physiology and psychology. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781420944044
  • Publisher: Neeland Media
  • Publication date: 1/1/2012
  • Pages: 130
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Murray G. Murphey is Professor of Amer­ican Civilization at the University of Penn­sylvania.

Jo Ann Boydston is Director of the Cen­ter for Dewey Studies at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

Patricia Baysinger, textual editor of this volume, is a member of the Dewey Center staff.
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
Contempt for human nature
Pathology of goodness
Freedom
Value of science
Part 1 The Place of Habit in Conduct
Section I Habits as Social Functions 14
Habits as functions and arts
Social complicity
Subject factor
Section II Habits and Will 24
Active means
Ideas of ends
Means and ends
Nature of character
Section III Character and Conduct 43
Good will and consequences
Virtues and natural goods
Objective and subjective morals
Section IV Custom and Habit 58
Human psychology is social
Habit as conservative
Mind and body
Section V Custom and Morality 75
Customs as standards
Authority of standards
Class conflicts
Section VI Habit and Social Psychology 84
Isolation of individuality
Newer movements
Part 2 The Place of Impulse in Conduct
Section I Impulses and Change of Habits 89
Present interest in instincts
Impulses as re-organizing
Section II Plasticity of Impulse 95
Impulse and education
Uprush of impulse
Fixed codes
Section III Changing Human Nature 106
Habits the inert factor
Modification of impulses
War a social function
Economic regimes as social products
Nature of motives
Section IV Impulse and Conflict of Habits 125
Possibility of social betterment
Conservatism
Section V Classification of Instincts 131
False simplifications
"self-love"
Will to power
Acquisitive and creative
Section VI No Separate Instincts 149
Uniqueness of acts
Possibilities of operation
Necessity of play and art
Rebelliousness
Section VII Impulse and Thought 169
Part 3 The Place of Intelligence in Conduct
Section I Habit and Intelligence 172
Habits and intellect
Mind, habit and impulse
Section II The Psychology of Thinking 181
The trinity of intellect
Conscience and its alleged separate subject-matter
Section III The Nature of Deliberation 189
Deliberation as imaginative rehearsal
Preference and choice
Strife of reason and passion
Nature of reason
Section IV Deliberation and Calculation 199
Error in utilitarian theory
Place of the pleasant
Hedonistic calculus
Deliberation and prediction
Section V The Uniqueness of Good 210
Fallacy of a single good
Applied to utilitarianism
Profit and personality
Means and ends
Section VI The Nature of Aims 223
Theory of final ends
Aims as directive means
Ends as justifying means
Meaning well as an aim
Wishes and aims
Section VII The Nature of Principles 238
Desire for certainty
Morals and probabilities
Importance of generalizations
Section VIII Desire and Intelligence 248
Object and consequence of desire
Desire and quiescence
Self-deception in desire
Desire needs intelligence
Nature of idealism
Living in the ideal
Section IX The Present and Future 265
Subordination of activity to result
Control of future
Production and consummation
Idealism and distant goals
Part 4 Conclusion
Section I The Good of Activity 278
Better and worse
Morality a process
Evolution and progress
Optimism
Epicureanism
Making others happy
Section II Morals are Human 295
Humane morals
Natural law and morals
Place of science
Section III What is Freedom? 303
Elements in freedom
Capacity in action
Novel possibilities
Force of desire
Section IV Morality is Social 314
Conscience and responsibility
Social pressure and opportunity
Exaggeration of blame
Importance of social psychology
Category of right
The community as religious symbol
Index 333
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Decent.

    An interesting read--some words are quite jumbled and difficult to navigate, though.

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