Overview

Human Performance Models for Computer-Aided Engineering is a collection of papers that deals with the relationship between scientific theories of human performance and practical engineering. This collection describes the emergence of a scientific engineering paradigm that uses computational theories in computational design aids. This book also considers computational human factors such as human performance models and their application in computer-based engineering designs. This text then presents applications of ...
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Human Performance Models for Computer-Aided Engineering

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Overview

Human Performance Models for Computer-Aided Engineering is a collection of papers that deals with the relationship between scientific theories of human performance and practical engineering. This collection describes the emergence of a scientific engineering paradigm that uses computational theories in computational design aids. This book also considers computational human factors such as human performance models and their application in computer-based engineering designs. This text then presents applications of these models to some helicopter flight problems. This book also explains the four requirements in programming a computer-based model of the sensory performance of a pilot as 1) prediction capability; 2) measurement capability; 3) provision of compatible computer algorithms; and 4) image driven. This collection also describes cognitive structures-aspects of the human information processing system. This text then discusses resource management and time-sharing issues that is related to competition of scarce resources, which can be predictive of the quality of information processing. This book also describes other modeling scenarios such as those predicting human errors, decision making, and shape modeling. This text can prove valuable for computer programmers, engineers, physicists, and research scientists dealing with psychophysics.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Concerned with models of human performance and their use in computer- based engineering facilities for the design of complex systems. The book focuses on a particular design problem--cockpit systems for advanced helicopters--and on a particular aspect of human performance--vision, which it relates to other cognitive functions. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781483272399
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 6/28/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 344
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Julian Hochberg is the Centennial Professor Emeritus at Columbia University. Dr. Hochberg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association.
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Table of Contents

Foreword


Preface


Part I


1 Introduction


Helicopter Flight Problems and Applications of Human Performance Models


Detectability and Visibility


Surface and Motion Estimation


Object Recognition


Hetero-Ocular Vision


Workload and Pilot Performance


Decision Theory


Memory Overload


Skill Acquisition


Human Error


References


2 Preview of Models


Framework


Assessment of Models


3 Use and Integration of Models


Design Process


Toolbox Framework


Selecting Tools and Models


Engineering Analyses


Discussion


Afterword


References


Part II


4 Introduction to Vision Models


5 Models in Early Vision


Overview


Introduction


What is a Model?


Model Attributes


Spatial Vision


Temporal Sensitivity


Motion Processing


Summary


References


6 Models of Static Form Perception


Image Generation


Image Analysis


Potential Applications


References


7 Structure from Motion


Overview


Introduction


Models


Conclusion


Research Needs: Structure from Motion


References


8 Motion-Based State Estimation and Shape Modeling


Introduction and Summary


Framework for Motion-Based State Estimation and Shape Modeling


Review of Research in Motion-Based State Estimation and Shape Modeling


Model Applications and Limitations


Future Research


References


9 Real-Time Human Image Understanding in Pilot Performance Models


Theories of Object Recognition


Model-Based Matching: Lowe's SCERPO and UUman's Alignment Models


Perception of Multiobject Displays


References


10 Manipulation Of Visual Information


Summary


Introduction


Transformations on Information Presented in a Static Visual Display


Memory for Positions in a Sequence of Static Displays


Extrapolation of Perceptually Driven Spatial Transformations


Judgments of Object Structure from Partial Views


Future Research


References


11 Combining Views


Integration of Successive Views


Binocular Combination


References


12 Afterword


13 Introduction to Cognition Models


14 Cognitive Architectures


Symbolist Architectures


Connectionist Models


References


15 Resource Management and Time-Sharing


Overview


Serial Allocation


Parallel Allocation


Serial Competition


Parallel Competition


Synthesis of the Optimal Model


Conclusion


References


16 Models of Working Memory


Phenomena of Working Memory


Models of Working Memory


References


17 Training Models to Estimate Training Costs for New Systems


Overview


Skill Development


Models for Predicting Human Performance


Engineering Guidance without an All-inclusive Model


Use of Rapid Prototyping and Quick Empirical Evaluations


Needed Research


References


18 Modeling Scenarios for Action


Fixed Scenarios


Scenarios with Simple Contingencies


Modeling More Complex Scenarios


References


19 Modeling and Predicting Human Error


Introduction


Error Modeling


References


20 Modeling Decision Making for System Design


Why Decision Making Seems Easy to Model-Sometimes


Implication for Modeling Operator Performance


Modeling without Optimality


Making Behavior More Model-like


Testing the Limits of Decision Making


References


21 Knowledge Elicitation and Representation


Knowledge Elicitation


Knowledge Representation


Mental Models and Design Decisions


References


22 Afterword


Part IV


23 Findings and Recommendations


Desirable Attributes and Types of Models


Adequacy of Models for the A3I Design Facility


Validation


Need for Access to Human Factors Data Base


Broader Context of Computational Human Factors


Importance of the System Design Context for Research on Models


Focusing the A3I Program


Providing a Framework and a Box of Tools



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