Human Reasoning and Cognitive Science

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$37.17
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $23.98
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 45%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $23.98   
  • New (5) from $35.42   
  • Used (3) from $23.98   

Overview

"In Human Reasoning and Cognitive Science, Keith Stenning and Michiel van Lambalgen - a cognitive scientist and a logician - argue for the indispensability of modern mathematical logic to the study of human reasoning. Logic and cognition were once closely connected, they write, but were "divorced" in the past century; the psychology of deduction went from being central to the cognitive revolution to being the subject of widespread skepticism about whether human reasoning really happens outside the academy. Stenning and van Lambalgen argue that logic and reasoning have been separated because of a series of unwarranted assumptions about logic." Stenning and van Lambalgen contend that psychology cannot ignore processes of interpretation in which people, wittingly or unwittingly, frame problems for subsequent reasoning. The authors employ a neurally implementable defeasible logic for modeling part of this framing process, and show how it can be used to guide the design of experiments and interpret results. They draw examples from deductive reasoning, from the child's development of understandings of mind, from analysis of a psychiatric disorder (autism), and from the search for the evolutionary origins of human higher mental processes.
Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

James Greeno

"Once in a while there is a body of work that reconceptualizes a topic of research. This book reports and reviews such a body of work. The result is a framing and hypotheses about reasoning that, in my judgment, fundamentally reconstructs the psychology of inferential reasoning.... This book will be regarded as the major turning point in the field's development."--James Greeno, Learning Research, and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

James Greeno, Learning Research, and Development Center

Wilfrid Hodges

"This deep and stimulating book, by a leading psychologist and a leading logician, is about the choice of logical formalisms for representing actual reasoning. There are two interlocking questions: what are the right formalisms to represent how people reason, and what forms do the reasoners themselves bring to the world in order to reason about it? The authors'answer to the first question, using closed-world reasoning, allows them to analyse the wide range of strategies that people use for shaping their thinking. For example the book uncovers important links between autism and nonmonotonic reasoning. This may be the first book in cognitive science that logicians can learn some new logic from."--Wilfrid Hodges, Queen Mary,
University of London

Wilfrid Hodges, Herons Brook

James Greeno
"Once in a while there is a body of work that reconceptualizes a topic of research. This book reports and reviews such a body of work. The result is a framing and hypotheses about reasoning that, in my judgment, fundamentally reconstructs the psychology of inferential reasoning.... This book will be regarded as the major turning point in the field's development."—James Greeno, Learning Research, and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh
From the Publisher
"Once in a while there is a body of work that reconceptualizes a topic of research. This book reports and reviews such a body of work. The result is a framing and hypotheses about reasoning that, in my judgment, fundamentally reconstructs the psychology of inferential reasoning.... This book will be regarded as the major turning point in the field's development." James Greeno ,Learning Research, and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

"This deep and stimulating book, by a leading psychologist and a leading logician, is about the choice of logical formalisms for representing actual reasoning. There are two interlocking questions: what are the right formalisms to represent how people reason, and what forms do the reasoners themselves bring to the world in order to reason about it? The authors' answer to the first question, using closed-world reasoning, allows them to analyse the wide range of strategies that people use for shaping their thinking. For example, the book uncovers important links between autism and nonmonotonic reasoning. This may be the first book in cognitive science that logicians can learn some new logic from." Wilfrid Hodges , Queen Mary, University of London

Wilfrid Hodges
"This deep and stimulating book, by a leading psychologist and a leading logician, is about the choice of logical formalisms for representing actual reasoning. There are two interlocking questions: what are the right formalisms to represent how people reason, and what forms do the reasoners themselves bring to the world in order to reason about it? The authors'answer to the first question, using closed-world reasoning, allows them to analyse the wide range of strategies that people use for shaping their thinking. For example the book uncovers important links between autism and nonmonotonic reasoning. This may be the first book in cognitive science that logicians can learn some new logic from."—Wilfrid Hodges, Queen Mary,University of London
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262195836
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/31/2008
  • Series: Bradford Books Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 424
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Keith Stenning is Professor of Human Communication in the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. He is author of Seeing Reason and coauthor of Introduction to Cognition and Communication (MIT Press, 2006).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I Groundwork 1

1 Introduction: Logic and Psychology 3

2 The Anatomy of Logic 19

3 A Little Logic Goes a Long Way 43

4 From Logic via Exploration to Controlled Experiment 93

5 From the Laboratory to the Wild and Back Again 117

6 The Origin of Human Reasoning Capacities 139

II Modeling 173

7 Planning and Reasoning: The Suppression Task 177

8 Implementing Reasoning in Neural Networks 217

9 Coping with Nonmonotonicity in Autism 241

10 Syllogisms and Beyond 297

III Is Psychology Hard or Impossible? 343

11 Rationality Revisited 347

Bibliography 367

Citation Index 391

General Index 397

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)