Human Values and the Design of Computer Technology

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Overview

When scientists develop computer technologies, they focus on making the machine work reliably and efficiently, and human moral values are not often part of the equation. Perhaps this is due to the belief that technology has a value-neutral nature, and that issues of value are better left to philosophers. Batya Friedman, however, disputes this assumption with arguments that reveal the links between human values and computer technology.

Bringing together leading researchers and system designers, Friedman addresses fascinating and rich questions in Human Values and the Design of Computer Technology: If human values such as freedom of speech and privacy are controversial, then on what basis do some values override others in the design of technology? How can designers bring value-sensitive design into the workplace and still generate revenue? Friedman’s responses to these questions—and more—offer a clarion call for the embrace of value-sensitive design as part of the computer science culture.

"Interesting and important . . . The chapter on computer bugs and accountability alone is worth the trip (or click) to the bookstore."—Michael L. Gordon, Computing Reviews

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction 1
Pt. I Conceptualizing Human Values in Design 19
1 Bias in Computer Systems 21
2 Accountability in a Computerized Society 41
3 Disability, Inability and Cyberspace 65
4 Do Categories Have Politics? The Language/Action Perspective Reconsidered 91
5 Categories, Disciplines, and Social Coordination 107
6 Commentary on Suchman Article and Winograd Response 115
7 Social Impact Statements: Engaging Public Participation in Information Technology Design 117
Pt. II Computers as Persons? - Implications for Design 135
8 Computers Are Social Actors: A Review of Current Research 137
9 When the Interface Is a Face 163
10 'Social' Human-Computer Interaction 191
11 Reasoning About Computers As Moral Agents: A Research Note 201
12 Interface Agents: Metaphors with Character 207
13 Human Agency and Responsible Computing: Implications for Computer System Design 221
Pt. III Practicing Value-Sensitive Design 237
14 Workplace Database Systems: Difficulties of Data Collection and Presentation 239
15 Eliminating a Hardware Switch: Weighing Economics and Values in a Design Decision 259
16 Steps toward Universal Access Within a Communications Company 271
17 Social Choice About Privacy: Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems in the United States 289
Name Index 311
Subject Index 317
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