Humorous Ghost Stories

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Overview

Humorous Ghost Stories By Dorothy Scarborough

The humorous ghost is distinctly a modern character. In early literature wraiths took themselves very seriously, and insisted on a proper show of respectful fear on the part of those whom they honored by haunting. A mortal was expected to rise when a ghost entered the room, and in case he was slow about it, his spine gave notice of what etiquette demanded. In the event of outdoor apparition, if a man failed to bare his head in awe, ...

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Humorous Ghost Stories

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Overview

Humorous Ghost Stories By Dorothy Scarborough

The humorous ghost is distinctly a modern character. In early literature wraiths took themselves very seriously, and insisted on a proper show of respectful fear on the part of those whom they honored by haunting. A mortal was expected to rise when a ghost entered the room, and in case he was slow about it, his spine gave notice of what etiquette demanded. In the event of outdoor apparition, if a man failed to bare his head in awe, the roots of his hair reminded him of his remissness. Woman has always had the advantage over man in such emergency, in that her locks, being long and pinned up, are less easily moved-which may explain the fact (if it be a fact!) that in fiction women have shown themselves more self-possessed in ghostly presence than men. Or possibly a woman knows that a masculine spook is, after all, only a man, and therefore may be charmed into helplessness, while the feminine can be seen through by another woman and thus disarmed. The majority of the comic apparitions, curiously enough, are masculine. You don't often find women wraithed in smiles-perhaps because they resent being made ridiculous, even after they're dead. Or maybe the reason lies in the fact that men have written most of the comic or satiric ghost stories, and have chivalrously spared the gentler shades. And there are very few funny child-ghosts-you might almost say none, in comparison with the number of grown-ups. The number of ghost children of any or all types is small proportionately-perhaps because it seems an unnatural thing for a child to die under any circumstances, while to make of him a butt for jokes would be unfeeling. There are a few instances, as in the case of the ghost baby mentioned later, but very few.
Ancient ghosts were a long-faced lot. They didn't know how to play at all. They had been brought up in stern repression of frivolities as haunters-no matter how sportive they may have been in life-and in turn they cowed mortals into a servile submission. No doubt they thought of men and women as mere youngsters that must be taught their place, since any living person, however senile, would be thought juvenile compared with a timeless spook.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783847224068
  • Publisher: TREDITION CLASSICS
  • Publication date: 12/13/2012
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

Emily Dorothy Scarborough (January 27, 1878 - November 7, 1935) was an American writer who wrote about Texas, folk culture, cotton farming, ghost stories and women's life in the Southwest.
Scarborough was born in Mount Carmel, Texas. At the age of four she moved to Sweetwater, Texas for her mother's health, as her mother needed the drier climate. The family soon left Sweetwater in 1887, so that the Scarborough children could get a good education at Baylor College.
Even though Scarborough's writings are identified with Texas, she studied at University of Chicago and Oxford University and beginning in 1916 taught literature at Columbia University.
While receiving her PhD from Columbia, she wrote a dissertation, "The Supernatural in Modern English Fiction (1917)". Sylvia Ann Grider writes in a critical introduction the dissertation "was so widely acclaimed by her professors and colleagues that it was published and it has become a basic reference work."
Dorothy Scarborough came in contact with many writers in New York, including Edna Ferber and Vachel Lindsay. She taught creative writing classes at Columbia. Among her creative writing students were Eric Walrond, and Carson McCullers, who took her first college writing class from Scarborough.
Her most critically acclaimed book, The Wind (first published anonymously in 1925), was later made into a film of the same name starring Lillian Gish.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2015

    Ok but...

    Google scanning. Ha! It's as good as my pits. (We are twins and share a nook.) ~Elsie &Jazz &hearts &star &starf &#9786 &#9787

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2014

    Don't waste your time

    really bad spelling mistakes not just here and there but on every line.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Omg

    Omg omg omg omg so great

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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