The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren and Om Puri, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, and produced by Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Juliet Blake, DreamWorks Studios, and Participant Media.

“That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist.”

And so ...
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The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Novel

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Overview

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren and Om Puri, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, and produced by Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Juliet Blake, DreamWorks Studios, and Participant Media.

“That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist.”

And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life’s journey in Richard Morais’s charming novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, The Hundred-Foot Journey is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste.

Born above his grandfather’s modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in Lumière, a small village in the French Alps.

The boisterous Haji family takes Lumière by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restaurant opposite an esteemed French relais—that of the famous chef Madame Mallory—and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restaurant, and a slew of new adventures.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages—charming, endearing, and compulsively readable.
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  • The Hundred-Foot Journey
    The Hundred-Foot Journey  

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post Book Review
“Serious foodies will swoon. Morais throws himself into the kind of descriptive writing that makes reading a gastronomic event.”
New York Times Book Review
“The novel’s charm lies in its improbability: it’s ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ meets ‘Ratatouille.’”
author of Chocolat - Joanne Harris
"The Hundred-Foot Journey has great charm and is colorfully written, sensual and evocative.”
NPR.org
"A delicious fairy-tale-like read."
From the Publisher
“Hassan Haji’s tone of voice is something of a masterpiece, cosmopolitan but not entirely European either. And the quest for the Michelin stars is a real cliff-hanger. For anyone who loves food, and who cares for character, the book’s a banquet. Lovely stuff. What a superb Merchant Ivory Production movie it would have made.”

Simon Callow, actor (Four Weddings And A Funeral) and author ofOrson Welles: The Road To Xanadu.

"This novel, of mythic proportions yet told with truly heartfelt realism, is a stunning tribute to the devotion of family and food. Bound to please anyone who has ever been happily coaxed to eat beyond the point of fullness, overwhelmed by the magnetism of 'just one more bite.'"

—Booklist (Starred Review)

Anthony Bourdain
“Outstanding! Easily the best novel ever set in the world of cooking.”
Booklist
“This novel, of mythic proportions yet told with truly heartfelt realism, is a stunning tribute to the devotion of family and food, in that order.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439165669
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 7/6/2010
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 12,809
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Richard C. Morais is the editor of Penta, a Barron’s website and quarterly magazine. An American raised in Switzerland, Morais has lived most of his life overseas, returning to the United States in 2003. He is the author of The Hundred-Foot Journey and Buddhaland Brooklyn. He lives in New York City.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 32 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 31, 2010

    What a Wonderful Story!

    I loved, loved, loved, this book. Had a hard time putting it down and couldn't wait to pick it up again. I'm not a "cook" by any stretch of the imagination, and really just recently started trying new recipes and experimenting with flavors and spices, so I wasn't sure if this book was going to appeal to me. NO WORRIES! You do not have to know much about cooking at all, but maybe just have an appreciation for the dining experience and love a really well-written, vivid, and passionately told story. The characters were so well written, they just came out of the pages as well as the author's descriptions of the food and the atmosphere of a restaurant/kitchen. I simply fell in love with Hassan and the entire cast of characters. I kept thinking what a great film it would make!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Richard C. Morais' debut novel, The Hundred Foot Journey, is a t

    Richard C. Morais' debut novel, The Hundred Foot Journey, is a travel book for anyone who has ever watched The Food Network and thought, "Wherever that kitchen is, that's where I want to go."

    Food is the language of this book. The character of Hassan Haji sometimes struggles with issues of identity and belonging as he travels from Mumbai to London to Lumiere to Paris, but always this struggle is phrased in terms of food: to make curry or frogs legs, to seek out tiffin boxes or fish and chips. Even his Muslim identity is mentioned rarely except when relating to diet: to eat pork or not. Ultimately Hassan's true identity is food. His religion is food. His ethnicity is food. His blood runs with curry and wine and butter and garlic and the jus of fresh oysters.

    It's as though Pi Patel from Life of Pi was experiencing some sort of cosmic opposites day: an Indian boy, instead of trying to find his way home while adrift and alone, is continually travelling further afield while being wrapped in the memories and support of his family; where Pi invented stories to quell his loneliness, Hassan sometimes longs for solitude so he may study the stories of the ancient cookbooks which surround him; where Pi's starvation was his constant companion, Hassan's one constant is food.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2010

    Highly recommend

    Loved this book. It was good, hearfelt story with so many poignant moments.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 10, 2014

    A Must Read

    I devoured this book. Exceptionally well written culinary journey across time and culture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2014

    Great book

    Totally enjoyed everything about 100 foot journey!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    Colorful, heartwarming, made me hungry

    Absolutely loved this book. Food plays a major role, and the colors and aromas come alive, making my mouth water. But mostly it is about the journey of a family and one boy in particular, adjusting from the hustle, bustle and chaos of his youth in India to the serenity, detail and distance of Europe. Must read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2011

    Left me with some indigestion...

    I really enjoyed the first half of the book. Great character development and understanding by the author of what a good story is. Second half left me cold. The author seemed to lose the purpose and richness of relationships that he brought to the table in the first half. I definitely felt rushed through dessert and coffee on this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2010

    Insightful read

    I enjoyed this book's correlation between food, family, and life.

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  • Posted December 7, 2010

    Just a luscious little book!

    I totally enjoyed "The Hundred-Foot Journey"! First of all, it's about food and cooking and restaurants and chefs----what's not to love? And it's about the growth and education of one particular young chef from India to England to rural France to Paris and into the Michelen universe. The descriptions of food and recipes and cooking arts intertwined with the fascinating plot made me keep a note pad by my chaise to jot down cooking tips I didn't want to forget. And the wild and wonderful path this young man took on his journey kept me up late trying to finish. The stories about famous chefs and how Michelen stars are earned---and what happens when they aren't---were enthralling. The story of this young man's family, their hopes and dreams for him, and their encouragement and pride added depth to the fast-paced plot. I told a chef friend about the book and he asked me to "donate" it to him. Then he "donated" it to a fellow chef. Even experienced chefs found it a great read.

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  • Posted August 17, 2010

    The writing is lush, very descriptive of the tastes, smells, and sights.

    The Hundred-Foot Journey is the story of Hassan Haji, a young Indian boy who grows up above his grandfather's restaurant in Mumbai. A tragic incident prompts his family to flee to France were Hassan shows an unexpected talent and taste for haute cuisine. The novel follows his ensuing career as a chef and the fate of his family in France.

    The first part of the book centers on Hassan's family, his history and the importance of food in his life. The writing is lush, very descriptive of the tastes, smells, and sights. The characters are interesting and the plot is fast-paced. However, after Hassan becomes a chef the thread of the story changes. The second half of the book is mostly about the politics of the restaurant world in France. The star system of ranking, the changes in haute cuisine, and the hierarchy among chefs. I didn't like this part nearly as well and I felt like Hassan's progress was stagnant. He seems to stop developing much as a person after a certain point.

    Still, a pleasant, easy read and not bad at all for a first novel. I'll be interested to see what Richard Morais writes next.

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    Posted January 16, 2012

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    Posted April 5, 2011

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    Posted August 22, 2011

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    Posted August 13, 2010

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    Posted June 11, 2012

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    Posted December 8, 2011

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    Posted August 21, 2010

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    Posted August 8, 2011

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