Hungarian Cookbook

( 2 )

Overview

"Our appetite for this interesting cuisine, a melding of Germanic, Slavic, Tartar, and Turkish influences, has been whetted by [this] excellent new work."--New York Times

"Our appetite for this cuisine, a melding of Germanic, Slavic, Tartar and Turkish influences, has been whetted by this excellent new work."--New York Times

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Paperback (1st Perennial Library ed)
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Overview

"Our appetite for this interesting cuisine, a melding of Germanic, Slavic, Tartar, and Turkish influences, has been whetted by [this] excellent new work."--New York Times

"Our appetite for this cuisine, a melding of Germanic, Slavic, Tartar and Turkish influences, has been whetted by this excellent new work."--New York Times

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060914370
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/28/1987
  • Edition description: 1st Perennial Library ed
  • Edition number: 60
  • Pages: 258
  • Sales rank: 200,629
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Derecskey was born in New York City and educated at Brooklyn College and the University of Strasbourg. She worked in publishing and journalism until she met a transplanted European journalist named Charles Derecskey, by origin a Hungarian from Transylvania, and embarked on the globe-trotting uncertainties of life with a foreign correspondent. Already an accomplished cook in the French mode, she began to cook Hungarian, first as a treat for her husband, then as a parlor trick, finally as an obsession.

When the Derecskeys returned to the United States, Susan already had an extensive collection of notes and recipes she had accumulated and tested wherever they were: the Congo, Paris, Germany andas culmination -- Hungary. Here, in the fine restaurants of Budapest and the more modest establishments and homes of Transylvania, she learned how the classic dishes should be made and developed that instinct for the cuisine that separates the gifted cook from the merely skillful one.

Her husband and two young sons cheered her on through the writing of The Hungarian Cookbook. They still gather every summer in the big kitchen at Ledgewood in the Adirondack Mountains, where many of the recipes in the book were put to the test. This annual ceremony of renewal is bound to feature such enshrined favorites as kohlrabi soup and chicken paprikash and one or more of those fabulous Hungarian desserts.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent cookbook for native Hungarians as well as learning New World citizens.

    I own two and each of my two daughters own one copy of this excellent cookbook. Recipes are comprehensive, easy to do, connected with Hungarian folk-history. Personally I own at least 50 cookbooks, many of them Hungarian and/or eastern european, including one 99 years old! This cookbook - Hungarian Cookbook, by Susan Derecskey - is the basis of many of our Christmas/Easter baking, such as poppyseed and walnut rolls. Any one can follow these recipes and earn praises!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2012

    I have a well-worn 1972 edition of The Hungarian Cookbook. The

    I have a well-worn 1972 edition of The Hungarian Cookbook. The recipes are authentic and the instructions easy to follow for beginners or those new to Hungarian cooking. I grew up on my Mom's wonderful Hungarian cuisine but like any good cook, she did not have recipes. Thanks to Susan Derecskey, I consider myself a passable Hungarian cook as I keep her cookbook close at hand.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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