Hunger and Public Action / Edition 1

Hunger and Public Action / Edition 1

by Jean Dreze, Amartya Sen, Jean Dr Ze
     
 

ISBN-10: 0198283652

ISBN-13: 9780198283652

Pub. Date: 03/14/1991

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Examining the problem of hunger in the modern world and the role public opinion might play in combating it, Drèze and Sen here provide a coherent perspective on the complex nutritional, economic, social, and political issues involved in the analysis of hunger. They explore famine prevention through a series of case studies in Africa and elsewhere, and

Overview

Examining the problem of hunger in the modern world and the role public opinion might play in combating it, Drèze and Sen here provide a coherent perspective on the complex nutritional, economic, social, and political issues involved in the analysis of hunger. They explore famine prevention through a series of case studies in Africa and elsewhere, and discuss the problem of chronic undernourishment. Sen was awarded the second Agnelli Prize for the Ethical Dimension in Advanced Societies in March 1990 in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the understanding of the ethical dimension in modern society.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198283652
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
03/14/1991
Series:
WIDER Studies in Development Economics Series
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
398
Product dimensions:
9.19(w) x 6.13(h) x 0.94(d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures
xv
List of Tables
xvii
Part I Hunger in the Modern World
Introduction
3(17)
Past and Present
3(4)
Famine and Chronic Undernourishment
7(2)
Some Elementary Concepts
9(8)
Public Action for Social Security
17(3)
Entitlement and Deprivation
20(15)
Deprivation and the Law
20(2)
Entitlement Failures and Economic Analysis
22(3)
Availability, Command and Occupations
25(6)
The 'Food Crisis' in Sub-Saharan Africa
31(4)
Nutrition and Capability
35(11)
World Hunger: How Much?
35(2)
Food Deprivation and Undernourishment
37(5)
Poverty and Basic Capabilities
42(4)
Society, Class and Gender
46(19)
Are Famines Natural Phenomena?
46(1)
Society and Cooperative Conflicts
47(3)
Female Deprivation and Gender Bias
50(5)
Famine Mortality and Gender Divisions
55(1)
Gender and Cooperative Conflicts
56(4)
Protection, Promotion and Social Security
60(5)
Part II Famines
Famines and Social Response
65(20)
Famine Prevention and Entitlement Protection
65(3)
African Challenge and International Perception
68(3)
Informal Security Systems and Concerted Action
71(4)
Aspects of Traditional Response
75(6)
Early Warning and Early Action
81(4)
Famines, Markets and Intervention
85(19)
The Strategy of Direct Delivery
85(2)
Availability, Prices and Entitlements
87(2)
Private Trade and Famine Vulnerability
89(4)
Speculation, Hoarding and Public Distribution
93(2)
Cash Support
95(7)
An Adequate Plurality
102(2)
Strategies of Entitlement Protection
104(18)
Non-exclusion, Targeting and Selection
104(3)
Alternative Selection Mechanisms
107(2)
Feeding and Family
109(4)
Employment and Entitlement
113(5)
A Concluding Remark
118(4)
Experiences and Lessons
122(43)
The Indian Experience
122(4)
A Case-Study: The Maharashtra Drought of 1970--1973
126(7)
Some African Successes
133(25)
Lessons from African Successes
158(7)
Part III Undernutrition and Deprivation
Production, Entitlements and Nutrition
165(14)
Introduction
165(1)
Food Self-Sufficiency?
165(3)
Food Production and Diversification
168(2)
Industrialization and the Long Run
170(2)
Cash Crops: Problems and Opportunities
172(5)
From Food Entitlements to Nutritional Capabilities
177(2)
Economic Growth and Public Support
179(25)
Incomes and Achievements
179(4)
Alternative Strategies: Growth-Mediated Security and Support-Led Security
183(4)
Economic Growth and Public Support: Interconnections and Contrasts
187(1)
Growth-Mediated Security and Unaimed Opulence
188(2)
Opulence and Public Provisioning
190(3)
Growth-Mediated Security: The Case of South Korea
193(4)
Support-Led Security and Equivalent Growth
197(7)
China and India
204(22)
Is China Ahead?
204(2)
What Put China Ahead?
206(4)
The Chinese Famine and the Indian Contrast
210(5)
Chinese Economic Reforms: Opulence and Support
215(6)
China, India and Kerala
221(5)
Experiences of Direct Support
226(31)
Introduction
226(1)
Sri Lanka
227(2)
Chile
229(11)
Costa Rica
240(6)
Concluding Remarks
246(11)
Part IV Hunger and Public Action
The Economy, the State and the Public
257(24)
Against the Current?
257(3)
Famines and Undernutrition
260(2)
Famine Prevention
262(4)
Eliminating Endemic Deprivation
266(4)
Food Production, Distribution and Prices
270(3)
International Cooperation and Conflict
273(2)
Public Action and the Public
275(6)
References 281(78)
Name Index 359(10)
Subject Index 369

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