The Hunt for Willie Boy: Indian-Hating and Popular Culture

Overview

Winner of the Gustavus Myers Center Award for an Outstanding Book on Human Rights

In 1909 a sensational double killing in Southern California led to what has been called the West?s last famous manhunt. According to contemporary (white) newspapers, an Indian named Willie Boy killed his potential father-in-law in a fit of drunken lust, kidnapped his intended, and fled with her on foot across the desert. They were pursued by several posses, and when the girl slowed his flight, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $2.09   
  • New (7) from $14.21   
  • Used (9) from $2.09   
Sending request ...

Overview

Winner of the Gustavus Myers Center Award for an Outstanding Book on Human Rights

In 1909 a sensational double killing in Southern California led to what has been called the West’s last famous manhunt. According to contemporary (white) newspapers, an Indian named Willie Boy killed his potential father-in-law in a fit of drunken lust, kidnapped his intended, and fled with her on foot across the desert. They were pursued by several posses, and when the girl slowed his flight, Willie Boy heartlessly raped and murdered her, finally killing himself after a shoot-out with a posse. This story was immortalized in the important Robert Redford film, Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969).

In The Hunt for Willie Boy: Indian-Hating and Popular Culture, James A. Sandos and Larry E. Burgess correct the story of Willie Boy, a Paiute-Chemehuevi Indian, by weaving in previously unheard Indian voices to explain his motivations and actions and to present a more balanced retelling.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In 1909, before a manhunt that ended with his suicide, Willie Boy, a California Paiute-Chemehuevi accused of murdering his fiancee's father and then kidnapping and killing her, exemplified to whites their belief that Indians could not be ``civilized.'' Historians Sandos and Burgess reveal the Indian-hating underlying the numerous versions of the Willie Boy story, including that of writer Harry Lawton and the 1969 Hollywood movie Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here . Comparing the various accounts, the authors employ ethnographic research of Chemehuevi culture, ethnohistory, and oral history to unravel the mystery, reconstruct the events, and present the Indian perspectives. In so doing, they recover Willie Boy's ``song.'' Strongly recommended for public and academic libraries.-- Charles L. Lumpkins, Bloomsburg Univ. Lib., Pa.
Booknews
In 1909, southern California launched a manhunt for Willie Boy, a Paiute-Chemehuevi Indian, who was believed to have killed his fiancee's father, kidnapped his fiancee, and then murdered her as well. The authors draw on Indian voices and use three disciplines--history, ethnohistory, and literary analysis--in their attempt to recover the events and motivation of Willie Boy's real story from the versions created by the white press and subsequent novel and film depictions. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780806128436
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Publication date: 9/15/1996
  • Pages: 204
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

James A. Sandos is Professor of History at the University of Redlands and the author of Rebellion in the Borderlands: Anarchism and the Plan of San Diego, 1904-1923, also published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

Larry E. Burgess, who holds a Ph.D. in history from Claremont Graduate School, is Library Director in the A.K. Smiley Public Library at Redlands, California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)