Hunting and Gathering

Hunting and Gathering

4.0 13
by Anna Gavalda
     
 

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Prize-winning author Anna Gavalda has galvanized the literary world with an exquisite genius for storytelling. Here, in her epic new novel of intimate lives-and filled with the "humanity and wit" (Marie Claire) that has made it a bestselling sensation in France-Gavalda explores the twists of fate that connect four people in Paris. Comprised of a starving artist, her

Overview

Prize-winning author Anna Gavalda has galvanized the literary world with an exquisite genius for storytelling. Here, in her epic new novel of intimate lives-and filled with the "humanity and wit" (Marie Claire) that has made it a bestselling sensation in France-Gavalda explores the twists of fate that connect four people in Paris. Comprised of a starving artist, her shy, aristocratic neighbor, his obnoxious but talented roommate, and a neglected grandmother, this curious, damaged quartet may be hopeless apart, but together, they may just be able to face the world.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Love cures all that ails the troubled trio of "no-hopers" in this sentimental second novel by French literary sensation Gavalda (Someone I Loved; I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere). Camille, a talented artist exhausted by ennui and anorexia, cleans offices at night and cowers in a shabby garret by day. Philibert, the fastidious scion of a titled family, peddles museum postcards while squatting in his dead grandmother's Parisian manse, waiting for her estate to be settled. Philibert's roommate, Franck, a talented (and womanizing) chef with ambition to burn, motorcycles once a week to look in on his stubborn, ailing grandmother Paulette, an "inmate" at a retirement home. When Philibert finds Camille deathly ill one day, he rescues her from her icy garret and deposits her in his shabby but spacious home. Franck and Camille take an immediate dislike to each other, a sure sign that they're bound to fall in love—which happens, cutely, after they liberate Paulette. That's when, "for the first time, each and every one of them felt like they belonged to a real family." Gavalda's comically implausible and comfortably predictable novel of misfits is a Gallic charmer anchored by breezy and poignant storytelling. (Apr.)

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Library Journal

This second novel by best-selling French author Gavalda (Someone I Loved) is a slow boil; its choppy style makes its length (almost 500 pages) daunting. But soon it's rolling along and proves itself to be one of the more lighthearted books to deal with suicide, addiction, eating disorders, poverty, and abandonment. While it follows almost every clichéd formula relating to youth, art, and love-all compounded by the romantic Parisian setting (so many picnics!)-and sometimes ventures into forced dialog, it establishes a very real dynamic among its main characters: Camille, the intellectual artist waif; Philibert, the stuttering young aristocrat who rescues her from a freezing garret; Franck, the angry, overburdened young chef; and Paulette, Franck's ailing grandmother. This impromptu family lives and grows together in an old apartment that becomes the chambered heart of the novel. Even if you know exactly where the sentimental plot is headed, you want to make the trip with these people and believe in their particular brand of fairy tale. Recommended for public libraries.
—Prudence Peiffer

Kirkus Reviews
Three oddballs form an alternative family in Paris; its warm heart and youthful vibe have made Gavalda's novel, originally published in France in 2004, a bestseller in that country and elsewhere. Camille Fauque has hit rock-bottom, living on the streets, when a friend finds her shelter: a tiny maid's room in a grand old building in a ritzy Paris neighborhood. The skeletal 26-year-old is weighed down by life's miseries; once a talented artist, she now cleans offices after hours. Her salvation is a neighbor. The timid, gangly, stammering Philibert is no better at coping with life than Camille (he sells postcards), but the kind-hearted aristocrat recognizes a damsel in distress and installs her in his magnificent apartment, which he's guarding until an inheritance battle is resolved. Philibert already has one roommate, who uses the place just to bed his many girlfriends. Franck Lestafier is a talented if inarticulate saucier at a top-of-the-line restaurant; he cares only for his motorbike and his grandmother Paulette, who raised him. The frail old lady has just been moved into a retirement home, which she hates, and Franck finds his weekly visits there torture. Nor is he happy about the arrival of Camille: "She's skinny, stupid, pretentious, and as weird as my roommate." The thaw begins with their shared enjoyment of a Marvin Gaye album. Then Franck has her help out at the restaurant on New Year's Eve: She's a sensation. Only much later, in long monologues, will Franck and Camille reveal their troubled pasts. The "family" becomes complete when Camille moves sweet-natured Paulette in with them; she has quit her job to be a caregiver (she's also started drawing again). Will Franck and Camillebecome lovers? Of course, but Gavalda (Someone I Loved, 2005, etc.) rings changes on this predictable outcome, and sentimentality is held in check by Franck's habitual gruff profanity. A charming account of achieving happiness against the odds.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594481444
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/03/2007
Pages:
496
Sales rank:
270,918
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 8.23(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Anna Gavalda is an internationally acclaimed bestselling author, widely regarded as one of France's newest literary stars. A former high-school French teacher and mother of two, she lives outside of Paris.

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Hunting and Gathering 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
lildirtydesigner More than 1 year ago
It is true what others have said about this book, it isn't a book filled with plot but more about life. A story about four individuals coping with what they were given in life. I guess you can say, they made their own lemonade. You might want to ask yourself why should I care about these four characters if they don't do anything but live. For one it is how they come together and face the world as a family. Two the dependency that each of them have for each other as kinder spirits. Lastly, how they deal with the hand that was dealt with them and the growing up that each character does throughout the book. It is really a sweet book filled with great characters - ones that you might want to meet in real life. I was sad to have read the last page because you wanted this story to keep on living and how these characters lives have changed for the better and not the worse.
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Geez More than 1 year ago
This story is a truly heartwarming tale; not all fluff and romance, but people from different walks of life with unique problems coming together to help each other make their lives better. I love this book's mix of tragedy, love, humor and resolution in a feasible real-life setting. Honestly have read it over four times in the past two years I have had it! Highly recommend to someone that likes a more complex bittersweet feel-good book.
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Melyssa82 More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up in a section of B&N filled with employee recommendations. This book is beautifully written, even translated from its original French. There were a few French phrases I didn't quite understand, but I didn't find it took anything away from my overall enjoyment. A story of inner turmoil, perseverance and unlikely friendships, it is unique and somthing I will read again. I do plan to pick up additional copies to send as gifts.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
literati1013 More than 1 year ago
Gavalda is one of my all-time favorite authors. This is, by far, my favorite of her works. I only wish I could read it in its original French.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read the book in both Russian and English translations. I find Russian translation much better and accurate, from title ''Esemble, c'est tout' actually means 'Together, that's all'' to actual contest. The book is absolutely wonderful, doesn't matter what language you read, and the story line is exceptional. It makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you travel to Paris and fall in love with French culture. The only suggestion I have, if you read any other language, try to read the original or some other translation other than English. If you think about the name of the book 'Together, that¿s all' when you get to page 390, I promise it would make you want to cry.