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Hunting Trips in the Classroom
     

Hunting Trips in the Classroom

by Deborah A. Johnston
 

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Are you ready to go on a HUNT? I hope so! These hunts are a lot of fun, and they are educational. By spending fifteen to twenty minutes, you and your students will be able to do the following:

  1. Learn about animals, including their descriptions, habitats, predators, diets, and babies.
  2. Learn interesting facts about things, including geographical

Overview

Are you ready to go on a HUNT? I hope so! These hunts are a lot of fun, and they are educational. By spending fifteen to twenty minutes, you and your students will be able to do the following:

  1. Learn about animals, including their descriptions, habitats, predators, diets, and babies.
  2. Learn interesting facts about things, including geographical terrain and climate.
  3. Touch on several subjects and skill sets, such as social studies, literacy, visualization, Bi-Lingual (foreign languages), and more.
  4. Understand how you can apply classroom management to your classroom using the hunts for positive classroom behavior.
  5. See how the Texas state testing module is aligned to the hunts.

There are sixteen hunts ready for your classroom. Enjoy them!

HAPPY HUNTING!

Deborah A. Johnston

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781467870498
Publisher:
AuthorHouse
Publication date:
02/15/2012
Pages:
88
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.18(d)

Read an Excerpt

HUNTING TRIPS IN THE CLASSROOM


By Deborah A. Johnston

AuthorHouse

Copyright © 2012 Deborah A. Johnston
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4678-7049-8


Chapter One

BLUE MOUNTAIN (RAINBOW) LORIKEETS

DESCRIPTION

Type: Bird from the parrot family.

Weight: 3.5–5.6 ounces

Height: 9–11 inches long

Color: Head = dark purple-blue with yellow areas on the nape. Back of nape = reddish orange Chin = reddish orange Face = mostly reddish orange Back = lime green Tips of wings = lime green Under wing = black with yellow and green Chest = red with dark blue Belly = dark green Thighs = yellow green Upper tail = dark green with yellow tips Under tail = yellow and pink at the base Beak and irises = orange Legs = gray green Males and females look alike.

Intelligence: Very smart

Texture: Feathers

Tongue: Featherlike

Movement: Flies

Sight: Good

Hearing: Very good

Life span: 15–25 years in the wild

HABITAT

Terrain: Rain forests, woodlands, orchards

Climate: Humid subtropical (hot, humid summers and cool winters)

Sleep: Trees

Other animals: Dingoes, kangaroos, emus, tiger snakes, brown falcons, pythons

PREDATORS

Rainbow lorikeets need to be very careful because they are prey for brown falcons, whistling kites (bird), and pythons.

DIET

Rainbow lorikeets will eat flowers (pansies, nasturtiums, roses, hibiscus, marigolds, and dandelions), pollen, nectar, seeds, insects, and some fruit. Because of their high energy, they need to eat a lot of food and spend most of the day eating.

BABIES

Rainbow lorikeets usually have two or three white eggs in a clutch (a set of eggs during the nesting period). They will protect their eggs by keeping them in a tree cavity above the ground. The eggs are incubated by the female for a period of twenty-five to twenty-six days. With this species, the male will take care of the female by feeding her during the incubation period. After the chicks hatch, both parents will take care of them. The babies will stay with the parents for six to nine weeks before they're on their own.

INTERESTING FACTS

- They like to eat their food in a very interesting way—they eat upside down.

- They are very busy birds, moving from tree to tree, collecting their food.

- Lorikeets like to be together, and it is not unusual to see a hundred of them together.

- They like to eat in groups of twenty.

- After getting used to an environment, they begin mimicking different sounds they hear.

- They are very good talkers and make great pets.

- They have very high energy.

BLUE MOUNTAIN (RAINBOW) LORIKEETS HUNT

This hunt is going to take place on the Queensland Coast of Australia. All information and statistics come, verbatim, from the World Factbook (Central Intelligence Agency) website in September 2010:

Continent: Australia

Conventional long form: Commonwealth of Australia

Conventional short form: Australia

Population: 21,262,641 (July 2010 est.)

Capital city: Canberra

Languages: English 78.5%, Chinese 2.5%, Italian 1.6%, Greek 1.3%, Arabic 1.2%, Vietnamese 1%, other 8.2%, unspecified 5.7%

Currency: Australian dollar

Geographic coordinates: 27° 00' S, 133° 00' E

Location: Oceania, continent between the Indian Ocean and the South Pacific Ocean.

Students close their eyes, and the teacher explains what Queensland, Australia, looks like.

Think about a place that is pretty nice in January (their summer). The day temperature is normally in the mid to high seventies. Just imagine what you can see, like tall trees. You may even be able to hear the some of the wildlife, like dingoes barking.

Students open their eyes, and the hunt begins.

(Pause between phrases for dramatic effect.)

Here we are, going on a hunt, except this time, we're taking a nice, "easy" hunt. Let's just walk around the beautiful area of Queensland, Australia. That's right! We're going to Australia to see the beautiful rainbow lorikeet. Now, we still have to be careful. We especially don't want to get in the way of any snakes like the tiger snake or brown snake. QUIVER

Okay, let's get ready: Camera? Check. Hat? Check. Boots? Check. Sunglasses? Check. Walking stick? Check. Water? Check. Backpack? Check. Okay, it's time to kiss my mom. Big, huge check!

I'm ready. How about you? You are? Well, let's go.

OPEN DOOR/SHUT DOOR

WALK Look at all of the great wilderness.... I just love walking. Don't you? ....You do? ....That's great!

Do you know what? We're here in Australia, right? Well, I think we should speak with an Australian accent Don't you? Yes? Well, can you say, "G'day, mate"? Wow! That's neat I think we should keep speaking this way for the rest of the hunt!

STOP What was that? It's kind of tall, has a tail, cute ears, and a cute face. The face almost looks like a deer's. Wow! It looks like its tail is helping to keep it up. I know what that is. It's a kangaroo! Let's see if we can hop like a kangaroo. HOP

Okay, let's keep going. What's that? You want to take a picture? Sure, that's a good idea.

CLICK Okay, I think we're ready to keep on walking.

WALK Hey, what's that? It reminds me of an ostrich, but its neck isn't as long. It has a lot of feathers and long legs. Whoa! Did you see how fast those big birds ran? Those birds are called emus. I think we should keep on walking. I really want to find a rainbow lorikeet.

WALK Look over there! Those trees look pretty colorful. I wonder—do you think? Why don't we get a closer look.

STOP Look up. There they are! How beautiful! They look like rainbows that talk a lot. Wow! I'm taking a lot of pictures.

CLICK Okay, we found the lorikeets, and it's time to head back home.

WALK Hey, why are you hissing? What do you mean you're not hissing? I know I hear—uhhhhh. Oh, do you hear it too? You do? Well, that doesn't sound too good.

STOP Look over there. Do you see it? It is a tiger snake. I think we're getting in his way, and we should back away slowly. And now, we should run! RUN

To end the hunt, lead the students in repeating the movements in reverse order without talking. This must be done quickly, as if they're afraid they will be caught.

Then, end safely back at the start and give Mom a big kiss.

EMPEROR PENGUIN

DESCRIPTION

Type: Bird

Group Name: Colony

Weight: Up to 88 lbs

Height: 45 inches

Color: Lighter color on the belly and darker color on back and wings

Intelligence: More instinctive than intelligent

Head: Big

Tail: Wedge-shaped

Feet: Webbed

Wings: Flipperlike

Texture: So many feathers that you cannot feel their tummies

Movement: Uses two legs to walk and run; webbed feet and flipperlike wings help them swim

Smell: May have some sense of smell

Hearing: Can hear very well

Sight: Good eyesight

Life span: 15–20 years in the wild

Size relative to a six-foot man: (NationalGeographic.com)

HABITAT

Terrain: Ice lands

Climate: Frigid

Sleep: To protect themselves from their predators, they take small naps throughout the day. For further protection, and warmth, they will normally sleep in groups.

Other Animals: Sea lions, leopard seals

PREDATORS

Leopard seals, sea lions, killer whales, birds of prey (eat eggs and chicks)

DIET

Carnivore (meat eater)

The emperor penguin eats fish and squid; it will eat around three pounds of fish a day.

BABIES

An interesting thing about emperor penguins is that the male will keep the newly laid egg warm. The egg is balanced on his feet and covered by a brood pouch (feathered skin). The male will do this until the female returns with food for the baby (can take up to two months). Once born, the chicks are taken care of by their mothers and are protected from the weather inside of the mother's brood pouch.

In December, the weather becomes warmer and open waters appear as the ice begins to break up. This happens at the time when the young are ready to fish and swim on their own.

INTERESTING FACTS

- They can see clearly on land and in water.

EMPEROR PENGUIN HUNT

This hunt is going to take place in Antarctica. All information and statistics come, verbatim, from the World Factbook (Central Intelligence Agency) website in September 2010:

Continent: Antarctica

Conventional long form: None

Conventional short form: Antarctica

Population: No indigenous inhabitants, but there are both permanent and summer-only staffed research stations

Capital city: None

Languages: None

Currency: None

Geographic coordinates: 90° S, 0.00° E

Location: Continent mostly south of the Antarctic Circle

Students close their eyes, and the teacher explains what Antarctica looks like.

Think about a place with snow everywhere you look. It is very, very cold; actually, it is freezing. You can feel shivers from the cold, and your nose feels as if it's frozen. Listen closely and you may be able to hear the roar of a sea lion or maybe the squawking of emperor penguins.

Students open their eyes and the hunt begins.

We're going on a hunt. It's going to be a coooooold hunt. Brrr! Where are we going? Why, to Antarctica, of course! What are we looking for? An emperor penguin, the biggest of the penguin species. Let's make sure we have everything we need.

Camera? Check. Boots? Check. Snowshoes? Check. Big, warm coat? Check. Scarf, hat, and gloves? Check. Goggles? Check. Kiss Mom? Check.

Okay, we're ready to go. Now, be very careful. It's very cold outside. Let's stick close together. Ready? Let's go.

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH STOP Do you know where we would find an emperor penguin? Well, I do. We have to keep walking until we get to the Ross Ice Shelf.

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH STOP This is taking too long. Let's get in our snowmobile.

OPEN DOOR/SHUT DOOR/TURN KEY

BROOOMMM Ah, that's better. Not so cold, too.

BRUUUUUMMMM STOP Oops, I think this is as far as we can go in our snowmobile. Ready to walk?

TURN OFF THE ENGINE/OPENDOOR/SHUT DOOR

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH STOP Wow! Look at all of the snow around here! It's like a winter wonderland. Let's take pictures. CLICK Okay, it's time to go.

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH STOP Look over there. There are some animals that look like they're wearing tuxedoes. Do you know what they are? I do. They're penguins! But not just any penguins. Those are emperor penguins. Let's get closer.

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH STOP Now, remember—do not touch the penguins. They don't like being picked up or touched. Let's just stand here and let them walk around us.

SQUAWK SQUAWK Did you hear that? That penguin walked right up to me and yelled at me! Do you know why? Because I was in his path and he had to walk around me. How funny. Let's take some pictures. CLICK I'd like to get a closer look at them diving into the water. Ready? Let's go.

SCRUNCH SCRUNCH Okay, I think if we get any closer we'll be swimming with the penguins! Wow! Look at them dive. It's great. I'm going to put my face closer to the water so I can see them underwater. I'd better make sure my goggles are on tight.

CHECK GOGGLES Now, let me look. Hey, I think I see something. Oh my! I think it's a leopard seal, and it looks a little hungry. Look at those spiky teeth! I think we're a little too close. Are you ready to run? RUN

To end the hunt, lead the students in repeating the movements in reverse order without talking. This must be done quickly, as if they're afraid they will be caught.

Then, end safely back at the start and give Mom a big kiss.

GREAT WHITE SHARK

DESCRIPTION

Type: Fish

Group name: School or shoal

Weight: 5,000 lbs. or more

Length: 15–20 feet, sometimes longer

Color: Gray on top and white underneath

Intelligence: The are considered intelligent

Body: Torpedo shaped

Tail: Long and powerful

Mouth: Have 300 serrated teeth that are in the shape of a triangle

Nose: Used to track blood, not to breathe

Gills: Used for breathing

Texture: Scales that are rough like sandpaper

Movement: Swims using tail at approximately 15 mph

Fins: Six fins: first dorsal, second dorsal, caudal, anal, pelvic, and pectoral

Smell: Remarkable sense of smell

Life span: 30–100 years

Size relative to a bus: (NationalGeographic.com)

HABITAT

Found: All over the world, except for Antarctica

Terrain: Oceans and seas

Climate: Warmer waters

Sleep: Fish do not sleep like humans. They have what are called active and inactive periods. They may stay motionless during inactive periods or they may keep moving; it depends on the fish and how its breathing is affected.

Other animals: Manatee, seals, sea lions, turtles, and whales

PREDATORS

Other than humans, sharks really aren't afraid of anything. It is a misunderstanding that sharks are afraid of dolphins. Dolphins will fight a shark and even kill it to protect their young, but other than that, they live very peacefully in the waters together.

DIET

Carnivore (meat eater)

Great whites are known to be the biggest predators in the ocean. They will eat sea turtles, sea lions, seals, and carrion (dead animals). At times, sharks attack their prey from underneath. They have also been known to breach, which means that they get moving so quickly that they come out of the water to get their prey.

BABIES

Females will migrate to warmer waters during the fall season in order to give birth to their babies. They are considered ovoviviparous, which means the eggs develop inside the mom until they are born. The pups develop very strong jaws within the first month after birth. The stronger pups will eat the weaker pups. They are usually born in the spring and summer months. They are on their own from birth.

INTERESTING FACTS

- "Great whites can detect one drop of blood in 25 gal (100 L) of water and can sense even tiny amounts of blood in the water up to 3 mi (5 km) away." (nationalgeographic.com)

- "They get their name from their universally white underbellies." (nationalgeographic.com)

GREAT WHITE SHARK HUNT

This hunt is going to take place on the island of Crete in Greece (Europe). All information and statistics come, verbatim, from the World Factbook (Central Intelligence Agency) website in September 2010:

Continent: Europe

Conventional long form: Hellenic Republic

Conventional short form: Greece

Population: 10,737,428 (July 2010 est.)

Capital city: Athens

Languages: Greek 99%, other 1% includes English and French

Currency: Euro

Geographic coordinates: 39° 00' S, 22° 00' E

Location: Southern Europe, bordering the Aegean Sea, Ionian Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea, between Albania and Turkey

Students close their eyes, and the teacher explains what Crete looks like. We are going to Crete during the month of August, when the normal temperature is eighty-eight degrees, the weather sunny and warm. Look around this beautiful island; it's 155 miles long. There are caves, cliffs, beautiful blue waters, and beaches. Listen carefully and you can hear the water lapping onto the beach.

Students open their eyes and the hunt begins.

Let's go on a great white shark hunt. Ready? Let's make sure we have everything we need.

Boogie board? Check. Camera? Check. Sunscreen on? Check.

OK, I am ready to go. Let's paddle out on our boogie boards.

KICK STOP Oh, no! Forgot something. I've got to go back and kiss my mom.

KICK KISS All right. I'm sure I've got everything now. Let's go.

KICK STOP Look over there. I see some monk seals. I can tell because they look like torpedoes— you know, like those big, huge bullets that come from submarines but with big eyes. Let's get closer.

KICK Wow! Look at them roll around. Let's roll like they do.

ROLL STOP This one looks curious. Let's see if it will let us pet it.

PET Oh, it's soft and fluffy like a cat.

LAUGH This seal just rubbed its whiskers against me! Let's take a picture.

CLICK Hey, where are the seals going? Let's follow them.

KICK STOP What's happening? The seals are swimming back toward us, fast. Wait a minute. What's that big thing coming out of the water? Did you see those teeth? Oh, my word! Those teeth belong to a great white shark! Yikes! Let's get out of here fast!

To end the hunt, lead the students in repeating the movements in reverse order without talking. This must be done quickly, as if they're afraid they will be caught.

Then, end safely back at the start and give Mom a big kiss.

HAMMERHEAD

DESCRIPTION

Type: Fish

Group name: School or shoal

Weight: 500–1,000 pounds

Length: 13–20 feet

Color: Gray-brown to olive-green on top; off-white on bottom

Intelligence: Very intelligent

Head: Rectangle (hammer-shaped)

Fins: Extra tall and pointed

Texture: Smooth, leathery feel

Movement: Swims

Sight: Excellent

Smell: Excellent

Taste: Uses its long, yellow, forked tongue

Hearing: Not very good

Life span: 20–30 years in the wild

Size relative to a six-foot man: (NationalGeographic.com)

(Continues...)



Excerpted from HUNTING TRIPS IN THE CLASSROOM by Deborah A. Johnston Copyright © 2012 by Deborah A. Johnston. Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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