Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina

by Dennis Brindell Fradin, Judith Bloom Fradin
     
 

On an August evening in 2005, Hurricane Katrina began a path of destruction and death along the gulf Coast. Two million people fled in time but thousands were trapped in the New Orleans vicinity as levees broke and flooded the city. Rescue efforts were handled poorly, adding to the chaos and suffering. Can such a national disgrace be avoided in the future?

Overview

On an August evening in 2005, Hurricane Katrina began a path of destruction and death along the gulf Coast. Two million people fled in time but thousands were trapped in the New Orleans vicinity as levees broke and flooded the city. Rescue efforts were handled poorly, adding to the chaos and suffering. Can such a national disgrace be avoided in the future?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Keri Collins Lewis
The United States endures many types of natural disasters: tornadoes, earthquakes, floods, droughts, and hurricanes. While each can cause great damage and devastation, the damage caused by hurricanes tends to be the most widespread. In August of 2005, Hurricane Katrina began in the Bahamas and moved through southeastern Florida. Once in the Gulf of Mexico, this powerful storm grew into a Category Five hurricane, the most powerful kind. With 175-mile-per-hour winds, Katrina headed toward the coastlines of America's southeastern states, including Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Although people were advised to evacuate their homes, many did not or could not leave. Once Katrina hit land, the winds, rain, and storm surge were unlike anything anyone had ever seen. Entire towns were destroyed, people were killed, and many left behind were stranded without power, water, or food. The story of Hurricane Katrina, one of the worse disasters in U.S. history, is told in simple language and haunting photographs in this nonfiction picture book, part of the "Turning Points in U.S. History" series. An introduction to natural disasters in general and more information about hurricanes specifically is followed by a matter-of-fact account of the events leading up to Katrina's landfall. Occasionally the wide-angle lens of the story narrows in on specific individuals, and the book concludes with a chapter on lessons learned from the tragedies experienced. Maps, full-color photos, a table of contents, a glossary, a timeline, a bibliography, additional resources, and an index are included. Reviewer: Keri Collins Lewis
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—Both books provide accurate, nonsensationalized information in well-organized, clearly written, and politically neutral texts. The photos are crisp, and, due to the subject matter, heartrending. The Fradins outline the factors that contributed to the disasters and then devote the remainder of the texts to the disasters themselves. There is also a brief discussion of issues that arose from them. In September 11th, the author writes briefly about the two fronts of the War on Terror, the Patriot Act, and health problems resulting from the attacks. The is less detailed than Andrew Santella's September 11th, 2001 (Children's Press, 2002), which is for a similar age group. In Hurricane Katrina, the authors explain why Katrina was so devastating and the need for disaster planning. There is no discussion of the progress made since the storm's destruction. The book is similar in scope to Mara Miller's Hurricane Katrina Strikes the Gulf Coast (Enslow, 2006).—Lisa Crandall, formerly at Capital Area District Library, Holt, MI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761442615
Publisher:
Cavendish, Marshall Corporation
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Turning Points in U. S. History Series
Pages:
47
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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