Hurricanes: Weathering the Storm

Hurricanes: Weathering the Storm

by Benjamin Hojem, Stephen Marchesi
     
 

Hurricanes are in the news more than ever before. But how many kids really know the amazing science behind these spectacular and often deadly natural occurrences? Our newest All Aboard Science Reader offers tons of interesting information about the cause and effects of hurricanes alongside full-color photographs.See more details below

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Overview

Hurricanes are in the news more than ever before. But how many kids really know the amazing science behind these spectacular and often deadly natural occurrences? Our newest All Aboard Science Reader offers tons of interesting information about the cause and effects of hurricanes alongside full-color photographs.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
The wind speed needed for a storm to be considered a hurricane is at least 74 miles per hour. While these storms are called hurricanes in the US, in other parts of the world they may be called typhoons or cyclones. Hurricanes are categorized by the strength of their winds. For example a category 5 hurricane would have wind speeds of 156 miles and up. Most kids today are probably aware of the big storm that hit New Orleans and this early reader opens up with the story of Katrina which severely damaged New Orleans in 2005. While hurricanes can strike many places in the world they can only form over an ocean. In addition the water temperature must be at least 81 degrees Fahrenheit, so these storms tend to form in late summer and early fall. Due to the Carioles effect, hurricanes north of the equator spin in a counterclockwise direction and the opposite direction south of the equator. Readers will learn about hurricane hunters and the advances in technology to study storm strength and potential landfall—early warnings can save lives and property damage. Hurricanes are given names and some of the more spectacular storms have names that will never be reused like Andrew, Camille and Katrina. One of the deadliest storms to hit the US occurred in 1900 in Galveston, Texas where thousands lost their lives. Diagrams and explanation are interspersed with photographs to help readers understand the science and technologies related to hurricanes, and illustrate the damage that a hurricane can cause. This very interesting Level 3 book in the "All Aboard Science Reader" series should have broader appeal than its intended audience—kids who are reading alone. Adults who want a simple explanation regarding these storms will find this book a most useful introduction. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780448454665
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/02/2010
Series:
All Aboard Science Reader Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.16(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

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