Hurricanes: Weathering the Storm

Overview

Hurricanes are in the news more than ever before. But how many kids really know the amazing science behind these spectacular and often deadly natural occurrences? Our newest All Aboard Science Reader offers tons of interesting information about the cause and effects of hurricanes alongside full-color photographs.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (37) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $1.99   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Hurricanes are in the news more than ever before. But how many kids really know the amazing science behind these spectacular and often deadly natural occurrences? Our newest All Aboard Science Reader offers tons of interesting information about the cause and effects of hurricanes alongside full-color photographs.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
The wind speed needed for a storm to be considered a hurricane is at least 74 miles per hour. While these storms are called hurricanes in the US, in other parts of the world they may be called typhoons or cyclones. Hurricanes are categorized by the strength of their winds. For example a category 5 hurricane would have wind speeds of 156 miles and up. Most kids today are probably aware of the big storm that hit New Orleans and this early reader opens up with the story of Katrina which severely damaged New Orleans in 2005. While hurricanes can strike many places in the world they can only form over an ocean. In addition the water temperature must be at least 81 degrees Fahrenheit, so these storms tend to form in late summer and early fall. Due to the Carioles effect, hurricanes north of the equator spin in a counterclockwise direction and the opposite direction south of the equator. Readers will learn about hurricane hunters and the advances in technology to study storm strength and potential landfall—early warnings can save lives and property damage. Hurricanes are given names and some of the more spectacular storms have names that will never be reused like Andrew, Camille and Katrina. One of the deadliest storms to hit the US occurred in 1900 in Galveston, Texas where thousands lost their lives. Diagrams and explanation are interspersed with photographs to help readers understand the science and technologies related to hurricanes, and illustrate the damage that a hurricane can cause. This very interesting Level 3 book in the "All Aboard Science Reader" series should have broader appeal than its intended audience—kids who are reading alone. Adults who want a simple explanation regarding these storms will find this book a most useful introduction. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780448454665
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/2/2010
  • Series: All Aboard Science Reader Series
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 406,163
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 0.16 (d)

Meet the Author

Benjamin Hojem lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)