Hurricanes (Witness to Disaster Series)

Hurricanes (Witness to Disaster Series)

by Judith Fradin, Dennis Brindell Fradin
     
 

Step into the eye of the storm. Follow the action, from the first news reports of a hurricane called Katrina gathering out at sea, to eyewitness accounts of those who survive the epic devastation she finally wreaks along the Gulf Coast.

Then look back at the history of these catastrophic storms and examine the science of hurricanes. How do they form? Why do they

Overview

Step into the eye of the storm. Follow the action, from the first news reports of a hurricane called Katrina gathering out at sea, to eyewitness accounts of those who survive the epic devastation she finally wreaks along the Gulf Coast.

Then look back at the history of these catastrophic storms and examine the science of hurricanes. How do they form? Why do they rage through the same regions? Which were the deadliest hurricanes in history? And how can scientists predict their landfall? All the answers are here, in an exciting narrative brought to life with stunning National Geographic photography of storm-ravaged landscapes and cities. The book's informative back matter contains all the facts that report-writers need, and includes a complete list of sources to find out more about this fearsome phenomenon. This season, Hurricanes will score a direct hit with children everywhere.

National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.
Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information. 

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Hurricane Katrina has been the subject of several books for young readers because it was an intense storm that inflicted great damage along the Gulf coast, to New Orleans in particular. The levees were breached, the city was flooded, thousands were stranded and trapped, and more than 1,600 were killed in Louisiana alone with most of the deaths in and near New Orleans. Many young readers will remember the TV coverage of this hurricane and books like this one can present background information about these storms, how the word hurricane entered our lexicon, how these storms develop, and finally how scientists categorize and classify them. One really fascinating chapter addresses the great storms of history and, while some of them may be familiar, this reviewer did not know about the typhoon that saved Japan when Kublai Khan's forces attempted to invade and conquer the country. Some of the storms such as Camille (1969 and the cyclone that hit East Pakistan in 1970) I do remember hearing about in the news. With the incidence of hurricanes rising, the National Hurricane Center ran through its list of names in 2005, and there is considerable interest in understanding why the weather seems to be changing and the number of storms increasing. Could it be due to global warming? "Many scientists also believe that by polluting our planet's atmosphere, human beings are contributing to the increase in hurricane activity." This is a well written book with information that may lead those interested in weather to read more and perhaps pursue a future as a meteorologist. The closing pages contain an extensive glossary, as well as a bibliography and recommendations for books and web sites that can provideadditional information. Other back matter includes a list of the interviews, acknowledgments, and a detailed index. The authors have even provided an e-mail address to respond to questions readers may have. hurricanes—fradinbooks@comcast.net. A good addition for any school, library or home collection.
School Library Journal

Gr 4-7- Opening with an account of Hurricane Katrina, the Fradins feature quotes from storm survivors in text and captions. Following a chapter on the science of hurricanes are discussions of historic storms, including a 13th-century Japanese "kamikaze" typhoon that destroyed the Mongol navy; a 1609 hurricane that blew a supply ship, the Sea Venture , off its route toward the North American colony to Bermuda; the 1900 hurricane in Galveston, TX; as well as hurricanes in Florida (1928), New England (1938), Mississippi (Camille, 1969), and the East Pakistan cyclone (1970). The book concludes with predictions and reasons for the recent increase in hurricane activity. Quality color photos illustrate the nature of hurricanes and the damage they cause. More detailed and at a more advanced reading level than Seymour Simon's Hurricanes (HarperCollins, 2007), this book adds the extra dimensions of survivors' accounts and a more historic focus.-Jeffrey A. French, formerly at Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library, Willowick, OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426201110
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
09/11/2007
Series:
Witness to Disaster Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.56(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1060L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Judith and Dennis Fradin have published over 150 books for children. They have won many awards, including the 2004 SCBWI Golden Kite Honor book award for The Power of One: Daisy Bates and the Little Rock Nine. Their most recent National Geographic title 5,000 Miles to Freedom: Ellen and William Craft’s Flight from Slavery was named one of Chicago Public Library’s Best Books of the Year, a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, and received a Blue Ribbon from the Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books.

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