Hurricanes: Earth's Biggest Storms

Overview

Tells how hurricanes form, how scientists study them, and how they have affected the United States throughout this century.

Tells how hurricanes form, how scientists study them, and how they have affected the United States throughout this century.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $70.00   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$70.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(217)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Tells how hurricanes form, how scientists study them, and how they have affected the United States throughout this century.

Tells how hurricanes form, how scientists study them, and how they have affected the United States throughout this century.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Susan Fournier
Lauber describes how hurricanes form and why we can expect them to become more frequent and more intense in the future. Learn how scientists study and track hurricanes. Read the tragic stories of the century's most damaging storms. By the time the book is finished, readers will feel like an expert. Vivid photographs, maps and informational diagrams enhance the text, and it's all wrapped up with an index and suggestions for further reading.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8An attractive, well-written book from one of the more competent authors in the children's science field. If you already own Dorothy Souza's Hurricanes (Carolrhoda, 1994) or Jonathan Kahl's Storm Warning (Lerner, 1993) you still need this one. Beginning with an unnamed but still remembered super-storm that churned across Long Island and slammed into New England in 1938, Lauber goes on to discuss the weather conditions that give birth to hurricanes and the technological developments that allow meteorologists to track storms and predict their paths and powers. She describes the awesome strength of Andrew in 1992 and its possible long-term effectsabetted by construction and other human activitieson the ecology of Southern Florida. A section on other dramatic storms and the local implications of shifts in global weather patterns rounds out the readable, informative text. Crisp full-color photos and clear maps abound, and a list of further readings makes the title useful as well as interesting to the inquiring mind. Well done, albeit slightly unnerving to those residing in high-risk areas.Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
A glossy book about monster storms, past and yet to be. Lauber (How Dinosaurs Came to Be, p. 553, etc.) begins with a description of the spectacular hurricane of 1938 that slammed into Long Island, bringing with it a wall of water 40 feet high that lifted entire houses off their foundations before moving on to Rhode Island where it swamped downtown Providence. With that attention-grabbing start, accompanied by many black-and-white historic photos that emphasize the devastation, Lauber steps back for an explanation of how hurricanes are formed, studied, and named. She recounts efforts to track, predict, and alter hurricanes, and then discusses more recent storms, including Hurricanes Andrew and Iniki in 1992. The full-color photos in this section show acres of palm trees flattened, buildings stripped of their walls, and a town turned to rubble. Noting that 1995, one of the busiest hurricane years of this century, may mark the beginning of a "heavy" cycle, Lauber discusses the implications for the more than 44 million Americans who live along the coastline and for fragile environments, such as the Florida Everglades. The book is thoroughly up-to-date, and, like its subject, quite powerful.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780590474061
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/1996
  • Pages: 64
  • Age range: 7 years
  • Product dimensions: 11.38 (w) x 8.82 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)