The Hurried Child, 25th Anniversary Edition

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Overview


With the first edition of The Hurried Child, David Elkind emerged as the voice of parenting reason, calling our attention to the crippling effects of hurrying our children through life. He showed that by blurring the boundaries of what is age appropriate, by expecting--or imposing--too much too soon, we force our kids to grow up too fast, to mimic adult sophistication while secretly yearning for innocence. In the more than two decades since this book first appeared, new generations of parents have inadvertently ...
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The Hurried Child-25th Anniversary Edition

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Overview


With the first edition of The Hurried Child, David Elkind emerged as the voice of parenting reason, calling our attention to the crippling effects of hurrying our children through life. He showed that by blurring the boundaries of what is age appropriate, by expecting--or imposing--too much too soon, we force our kids to grow up too fast, to mimic adult sophistication while secretly yearning for innocence. In the more than two decades since this book first appeared, new generations of parents have inadvertently stepped up the assault on childhood, in the media, in schools, and at home. In the third edition of this classic (2001), Dr. Elkind provided a detailed, up-to-the-minute look at the Internet, classroom culture, school violence, movies, television, and a growing societal incivility to show parents and teachers where hurrying occurs and why. And as before, he offered parents and teachers insight, advice, and hope for encouraging healthy development while protecting the joy and freedom of childhood. In this twenty-fifth anniversary edition of the book, Dr. Elkind delivers important new commentary to put a quarter century of trends and change into perspective for parents today.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Wall Street Journal, 9/4
“[The first book to] mourn the loss of play and leisure time [for kids].”

Washington Post, 11/5/09
“Read The Hurried Child by psychologist David Elkind. It explains the development of children so well and gives such good reasons for slowing them down that you'll want to give a copy to every parent you know.”

Washington Post, 3/12/10
“To learn more about children and how they grow, read The Hurried Child…It’s one of the great classics of parenthood.”
 

The Jewish Week, 6/23/10
“If you want to know more about the harmful effects of micro-managing our children’s lives, read The Hurried Child…[Elkind’s] main theme remains relevant more than 25 years after its initial publishing.”

Junior Magazine (UK)
Offers a fascinating overview of parenting issues today.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738210827
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2006
  • Edition description: Anniversary edition
  • Edition number: 25
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 225,160
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author


David Elkind, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus at Tufts University and the author of a dozen books, including The Hurried Child and All Grown Up and No Place to Go. He lives outside of Boston and on Cape Cod.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The Hurried Child ; Growing up too fast too soon!

    "Today's child has become the unwilling, unintended victim of overwhelming stress" (Elkind, 2007, p.3). This is one of the opening statements that I read in the book "The Hurried Child" by David Elkind. It is true that in today's society we are rushing kids to grow up to fast. They are burdened by their guardian's worries and often are the ones being left to parent younger siblings or even themselves. As a society we are forcing kids to think that they need to grow up faster than they actually do. This is hurting the child and will leave them having to pay the price for something others have put on them. Not only will this affect the individual but it will also affect the society in which they live in. You will learn this and much more from reading this book. Some will be things that you would have never thought of before but are important to learn. It is never to late to change the way you raise or work with a child.
    In my readings I found a strong statement that I think is extremely important for others to hear. Elkind states on page 18 that "The contributors to teenage suicide are multiple and complex, but it does not seem unreasonable to suppose that some of the contemporary hurrying stresses on teenagers, from the competition for high grades and getting into good colleges, to the pressure to use drugs and become sexually active, contribute to the increase in the number of young people who take their own lives." Before reading the book "The Hurried Child" I would have never assumed that dressing children in "stylish" clothing would be hurting them. I see now however how it may. The book liked to point out that we are creating mini adults when we dress them in mini replicas of what we may wear.In this book they talk about the orderly progression of the contractual learning process and how it is made to fit around the parents schedules rather than fitting to the child's needs. I believe that this book should be read by all parents,teachers, and college students that want to work with children so that they can look out for habbits that may be hurrying their children. It was overall an interesting and good read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted May 3, 2010

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    Posted June 7, 2011

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    Posted December 17, 2010

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