Hurry Granny Annie

Hurry Granny Annie

by Arlene Alda, Eve Aldridge, Eve Aldridge
     
 

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Have to hurry, can't be lateCatching something, something great.What's Granny running so fast to catch? Join Ruthie and her friend to find out in this fast-paced read-a-loud which had a splendid start in hardcover. Now our favorite high-speed grandmother takes off in paperback.

From the Trade Paperback edition.  See more details below

Overview

Have to hurry, can't be lateCatching something, something great.What's Granny running so fast to catch? Join Ruthie and her friend to find out in this fast-paced read-a-loud which had a splendid start in hardcover. Now our favorite high-speed grandmother takes off in paperback.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As Alda's (Pig, Horse, or Cow, Don't Wake Me Now) jaunty tale opens, Ruthie is floating in an inner tube with her fishing pole when Granny Annie rushes by. Wearing an outlandishly dotted dress and sneakers but otherwise resembling the wizened granny of the Beverly Hillbillies, she is chanting what becomes a refrain, "Have to hurry. Can't be late. Catching something. Something great." Still clutching her pole, the girl follows Granny Annie. In no time at all Ruthie's brother (wearing a baseball mitt) and friend Charlie (carrying a butterfly net) fall in behind them. Each time the youngsters ask Granny what she intends to catch, her response is interrupted by an enormous sneeze that sends her, the kids and a growing accompaniment of animals flying into the air. Reaching "the end of the road where the ocean began," the woman announces with relief that they are, indeed, in time to catch something great--the sunset. The kids are disappointed that fishing pole, mitt and net won't be helpful in making the catch, until they witness the sky and sea turning "from blue to pink to orange." Aldridge's (Sarah's Story) pictures, often ungainly in their depictions of the human characters, are at their best with the sunset sequences; these spreads convey the splendor of the glowing sun, its light and its reflection in the water. Providing an added treat for kids are the critters the illustrator slips into her scenes: a bird tries to snatch the worm from Ruthie's rod, a frog perches on Granny's hat and a raccoon peeks out from a sewer grate. Ages 4-7. (Aug.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-An energetic Granny sprints across the pages of this engaging cumulative tale. Her curious chant, "Have to hurry. Can't be late. Catching something. Something great," piques the interest of three neighborhood children and one by one they follow her. Every time the old woman is about to reveal what she is trying to "catch," she sneezes and sends everyone tumbling. Finally, they reach the ocean where they are "in time to catch the sunset!" At first the children balk, having expected to catch a fish, a baseball, or a butterfly, but the beauty and serenity of the scene wins them over. Aldridge's watercolor illustrations are bathed in a sunny orange and yellow background. They are integral to the momentum of the book: whimsical characters careen across the double-page spreads with glimpses of Granny Annie's striped bloomers and jogging shoes leaping off the pages. Youngsters will enjoy chiming in on Annie's lyrical refrain as well as on her stupendous "achooooos." Great fun for storytime.-Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A rollicking cross country sprint with their energetic grandmother leads siblings Ruthie and Joe and their friend to a wondrous discovery. Spying Granny Annie racing past, the children abandon their pursuits to join the chase; intrigued by her cryptic refrain—"Can't be late. Catching something. Something great"—the children speculate as to her goal. Heightening their interest is the fact that each time Granny Annie is about to explain where she is headed, she is interrupted and consequently distracted by a giant sneeze. Alda (Arlene Alda's 1 2 3, 1998, etc.) gives the tale an upbeat tempo, right to the surprising destination—at land's end overlooking an ocean sunset—that provides a foil to the chase. The loveliness of the setting sun overcomes the children's initial disappointment, providing them and readers with a reminder of the joy found in simple things. Aldridge's watercolors, done in shimmering golden hues, illuminate the beauty of an autumn sunset; she also includes whimsical elements for astute observers. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582460673
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
03/01/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.06(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.16(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

ARLENE ALDA is the author of Arlene Alda'¬?s ABC, Hurry Granny Annie, and 97 Orchard Street. She lives in New York City.
Eve Aldridge, like Granny Annie, enjoys running to catch something great, though mostly she just manages to catch up. Eve also illustrated SARAH'S STORY for Tricycle Press, and she lives in Oakland, California.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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